Sunday , June 25 2017
Home | News | Fired Lexmark workers hold news conference in El Paso; Tales of working conditions, alleged abuse shared

Fired Lexmark workers hold news conference in El Paso; Tales of working conditions, alleged abuse shared

The on-going labor dispute between international printer cartridge manufacturer Lexmark and their workers in Juarez was the subject of a Thursday news conference in El Paso, just miles from the worker’s camp.

Former Lexmark employees and Susana Prieto Terrazas, a lawyer representing the employees, continued their call for justice against the treatment and firings of Lexmark employees during a press conference on held at Cafe Mayapan.

Emotions ran high during the conference, as employees gave detailed accounts of their treatment while working at the factory and the challenges they faced then, and now that they are without work.

Susana Prieto Terrazas, a lawyer representing the former employees of Lexmark talks about the recent wave of firings Lexmark employees endured last week after walking off the factory site. Employees had demanded a raise of 6 pesos a day, and later formed a union. Once unionized the firings began
Susana Prieto Terrazas, a lawyer representing the former employees of Lexmark talks about the recent wave of firings Lexmark employees endured last week after walking off the factory site. Employees had demanded a raise of 6 pesos a day, and later formed a union. Once unionized the firings began

“These women, most of them single mothers, worked up to 14 hours a day,” Terrazas said in Spanish during the Press Conference. “Some of them having to travel 2 hours to work and 2 hours back home ­ leaving them no time with their children. They went through terrible conditions and were terrified to ask for more pay because they were under the impression that they did not have rights, and had to endure mistreatment at work because they did not receive an education.”

Miriam Delgado Hernandez, Paulina Rodriguez and San Juana Perez each talked about their experiences, and nodded along when Terrazas spoke of what she said were injustices at the factory.

“We were given three pairs of gloves to handle the materials each day,” Perez said. “If one of the pairs of gloves tore, you had to keep working with them. Also, because of the chemicals you worked with, some employees would get sick, and in some instances you’d get nose bleeds. Lexmark official would have you examined and each time the test results would come out saying you were ‘fine.”

Other instances of injustice, Rodriguez said, was a new company policy that was enacted which promised employees raises from 112, 114 and 120 pesos a day. However, there was a catch, new employees that were hired were more likely to receive these raises faster, than those who had worked at the factory for several years.

Rodriguez explained that any former skills or experience that employees had gained over the years, was completely wiped out.

“Here are our cards,” Rodriguez said. “For each new skill that we learn or master a hole is punched to show that we are certified in that area.

Miriam Delgado a former Lexmark employee shows off the new cards employees were issued. The new cards indicated that experienced workers had to start from scratch to earn raises.
Miriam Delgado a former Lexmark employee shows off the new cards employees were issued. The new cards indicated that experienced workers had to start from scratch to earn raises.

But then they issued these new cards. And they said that now our old cards and experience was no longer valid. So, in order to get a raise, we had to work with these new cards for 3 months without any infractions.”

But any little thing could be an infraction, Delgado added.

In other instances, employees were docked about half their pay if they missed a day of work for being sick, Delgado said.

“I’m a single mother and I would get paid 664.71 pesos a week if I didn’t miss work,” Delgado said showing her pay stub. “But if I missed a day of work because one of my kids was sick, they would take away close to 300 pesos ­ and pay me 399.55 pesos for the week.”

The dispute amongst workers and Lexmark began in November when workers had asked for a raise of 6 pesos, or about 34 cents a day. They are currently paid 70.1 pesos or about $4.03 a day. In addition raises were being requested for workers who had been with the company for five years or more.

When the increase was denied, according to Terrazas, employees walked off last week with the hope that they would receive a just response from Lexmark. Instead, Terrazas said, they were fired and their annual bonus was withheld.

Delgado said she feared for her life now that her face and name have been mentioned in the media. She added that the former employees are still without work and need assistance.

On Sunday, at noon a posada will be held for the family’s of Lexmark employees outside of the factory in Juarez at 3550 Bulevar Independencia (Independence Boulevard.) Terrazas said donations of children’s toys would be gladly welcome so that the children can have Christmas presents.

On Thursday, the media line for Lexmark’s Corporate Office was not available and an automated message answered, with the option for media to leave a voicemail. A message, from the El Paso Herald Post, requesting an interview was left at 2:30 p.m., MST.

Officials from Lexmark did not immediately return calls for comment.

Author/Photos: Alex Hinojosa

About Alexandra Hinojosa

“Once journalism is in your system, it’s hard to get it out… and then you realize, it’s there to stay.” – Alex Hinojosa is a full time instructor at El Paso Community College and a former El Paso Times journalist. FULL BIO

Check Also

Video+Story: El Paso At #10 on Resonance list of America’s 10 Best Small Cities

The City of El Paso along with Visit El Paso, an operating division of the …

2 comments

  1. mujerdejuarwz@yahoo.com'

    Lexmark is guilty for greed, but the Mexican government is guilty for treason to their own people. They go out and sale Juarez’s people’ labor for pennies to the USA and other developed countries. Then the politicians keep the money these companies pay in taxes of all sorts. Money that should be put to use for the Mexican people’s benefit is pocketed by federal, state and local rats, called government officers. We are sick and tired of being used and abused by our own government who, in alliance with the cartels, have us Mexican people living in poverty, misery and fear. Juarez’s people are hard-working, good-willed citizens who support most of the cities in the state of Chihuahua, yet, we are the poorest, worst equipped city in our state, because for some reason the state government acts like we don’t deserve a better life, even though we have such a great positive impact in our state’ s economy. We have endured enough pain and sorrow now. We are tired and we need help.

Socorro Renteria Realty 728×90