• December 4, 2020
 Medical Outfitting and Transition program efforts continue at Ft. Bliss new WBAMC hospital

Huntsville’s U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center Medical Outfitting and Transition (MO&T) program continues to oversee efforts to determine equipment needs, make purchases, currently estimated at $72 million, and plan and execute transition of staff, equipment and patients for the William Beaumont Army Medical Center replacement hospital at Fort Bliss | Photo By Mark Thompson

Medical Outfitting and Transition program efforts continue at Ft. Bliss new WBAMC hospital

Huntsville’s U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center Medical Outfitting and Transition (MO&T) program continues to oversee efforts to determine equipment needs, make purchases, currently estimated at $72 million, and plan and execute transition of staff, equipment and patients for the William Beaumont Army Medical Center replacement hospital at Fort Bliss.

MO&T is working in concert with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Fort Worth District as it coordinates the project’s construction components.

According to a Fort Worth District news release, “The replacement hospital will be a new 1.1 million square foot medical center to serve the growing active duty and retiree population in and around the Fort Bliss and El Paso area. The campus will include a main hospital, inpatient and outpatient clinics, administrative building, research building, central utility plant, two access control points and surface parking with over 4,000 spaces.”

MO&T teams provide total turn-key project support for the equipping and transitioning of staff and patients associated with new and renovated military healthcare and medical research laboratory facility construction projects to support the medical mission throughout the world.

Brian Bezilla, MO&T project manager, says his role is to perform daily project management duties and serve as Contracting Officer’s Representative on the MO&T contract.

The MO&T contractor engages with WBAMC staff to determine equipment needs, make purchases (currently estimated at $72M) and plan and execute transition of staff, equipment and patients from existing to new spaces.

“The Health Facilities Planning Agency is my first line customer,” Bezilla said. ” At least 7 HNC programs support them in these efforts.

The individual HNC project delivery teams have partnered to organically function as a broad PDT committed to HFPA. HFPA is pleased

William Beaumont Army Medical Center | Photo by Denisha Braxton

that they can come to HNC and get their needs met under one roof.”

Bezilla notes, when completed, the WBAMC hospital will be the largest stateside medical center in the Army portfolio. The hospital is actually a campus of six buildings, including administration, a clinical investigation, two clinics, hospital and central utility Plant.

The facility is off post and will have two access control points off two major highways in East El Paso.

Bezilla credits his program’s success in the project to teamwork.

“The entirety of the HNC team deserves recognition and praise,” Bezilla said. “As the construction pace constantly changes, we are required to be agile and adaptable in how we build and execute contracts. HFPA tends to work with MO&T over a longer time frame (currently six years on Bliss) than other HNC programs, so they tend to ask me the status of other programs’ efforts. Across the board HNC teams have been ready and willing to coordinate with me, provide advice and even asked me to review their work. As a result I consider us one big informal PDT.”

William Beaumont Army Medical Center | Photo by Denisha Braxton

Huntsville Center is a unique U.S. Army Corps of Engineers organization. The Center is not defined by geographic boundaries; its missions provide specialized technical expertise, global engineering solutions, and cutting edge innovations through centrally managed programs in support of national interests.

Huntsville Center’s more than 1,000 employees manage nearly 3,000 ongoing projects at any given time. These projects fall into one of five portfolios: Medical, Facilities and Base Operations, Energy, Operational Technology, and Environmental. The portfolios comprise 42 different program areas, as well as six mandatory and six technical centers of expertise, and 17 centers of standardization.

Projects are generally broad in scope, require technical expertise, centralized management or are functions not normally accomplished by a Headquarters, USACE organizational element.

Guest Columnist

Guest Columnists are residents who feel so strongly about a news event, a story or some other issue, that they decided to put their thoughts to paper - or computer screens. Or they are writers who have made their work available via other channels and we feature their work here, with permission. If you'd like to submit a column, please contact us at news@epheraldpost.com

Related post