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Home | News | Revamped Curricula at WBAMC’s Sim Center Aims to Increase Safety, Readiness
(From left) Officer Candidates Danielle Wilhight, Jessica Martin, and Javier Martinez (forefront), all Phase II students in the Interservice Physician Assistant Program (IPAP) at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, observe Maj. Raul Villalobos, clinical coordinator, IPAP, WBAMC, perform a stitching technique on a skin suture pad during suture and wound closure training as part of the IPAP phase II revamped curriculum at WBAMC's Simulation Center | Photo Credit: Marcy Sanchez

Revamped Curricula at WBAMC’s Sim Center Aims to Increase Safety, Readiness

William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Simulation Center kicked off the first of a series of revamped medical programs for medical students, staff, nurses and physicians at the hospital as part of the recently provisionally accredited center’s goal to achieve outcomes in medical simulation processes implemented at the center.

The center introduced a newly-revised curriculum for suturing and wound closures to students of the hospital’s Interservice Physician Assistant Program (IPAP), one of six Graduate Medical Education programs at WBAMC, during a scenario-based training, March 9.

“A credentialing body wants to see what the credentialing is for. So the more complete the course we can show them is, the better,” said Thomas Soto, simulation technician, WBAMC. “They don’t want to come in and credential random training.”

The step toward standardizing processes in the new curriculum will evaluate students based off scenario-based training, with students required to accomplish objectives during evaluation.

“(Faculty and students) have been (engaged in didactics) but they weren’t covering (scenarios) in detail and putting it into application,” said Joe Lloyd, interim nurse educator, Simulation Center. “Basically this is our (new) policy and we present scenarios and (situations to medical staff and students) where they have to act on the situation.”

The Simulation Center recently presented scenario-based training during an Emergencies in Clinical Obstetrics course aimed at providing OB-GYN staff training on situations from shoulder dystocia, hemorrhage to breech deliveries.

According to Soto, this type of training will not only prepare healthcare professionals for different patient situations but also increase patient safety.

“Whatever (students) end up doing (at the simulation center), when they actually go see the patient they’ll be more prepared for it because they’ve came in here and have done the repetitions,” said Soto.

Aside from increasing patient safety and staff readiness, the center’s upgraded curricula will also minimize the need for training outside of WBAMC. The center expects to recapture training currently performed at other health centers in the region, due to the increased trauma cases at the community hospitals.

“(Medical education programs at the hospital) have to get so many students to perform certain medical procedures, and there isn’t enough patients (requiring those procedures), so they have to do simulation,” said Lloyd. “We have all these different (medical education) programs that want to practice so to give exposure to everyone we have to simulate the environment.”

Future revamped training curriculum is anticipated to continue engaging staff and students throughout all of the medical education programs at the hospital. The center also hopes to incorporate role players in future simulations to educate and evaluate patient engagement and communications.

“(Students) will have to talk to a patient, do their assessment as part of their procedure, and perform that wound closure on a (mock) patient and a simulation model,” said Soto, discussing the IPAP suture/ wound closure scenario in particular. “(The scenario-based training) will improve patient care and make our simulation center premier.”

Author: Marcy Sanchez – WBAMC

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