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Home | Tag Archives: 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade

Tag Archives: 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade

Family Ties: Bound by service, duty, commitment

FORT BLISS – A family is only as strong as the bonds that connect them, and for the Fiore family, these bonds have been bolstered by a shared commitment to duty and service.

“All of us are committed to serving other Soldiers and Americans as best we can. We’re fortunate to have the ability and the opportunity to do so,” said Capt. Carolyn “Nina” Fiore, the commander for Troop D, 3rd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade. “I know that there are many families out there that the military has connected the way that we are.”

The Fiore family includes siblings Maj. Nicholas Fiore, an armor officer and future operations planner for 1AD, Capt. Elyse Pierre, a medical officer and board-certified doctor who is set to promote to the rank of major in May, stationed at Fort Stewart, Georgia, and Capt. Carolyn “Nina” Fiore, all of whom graduated from the United States Military Academy in 2007, 2010 and 2013, respectively.

The Fiore family also includes parents Nancy Colfax, a lawyer and graduate of Vermont Law School, and Uldric “Ric” Fiore, a retired member of the Senior Executive Service (SES) as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) Director for the Army. Ric was also the Chief of Staff for the U.S. Army Medical Command as well as a retired JAG Colonel who served in the Army for 30 years.

“We’re very proud of them for their decisions. They’ve chosen something that’s not about themselves but is in the service of others and we think that’s a wonderful decision,” said Ric when discussing the career paths that his children haven taken. “The fact that they’ve chosen the Army is just icing on the cake since we can live vicariously through them as our careers have ended and theirs continue.”

Military children are more likely than their peers to join the military. About 80 percent of recent recruits come from a family where at least one close relative was in uniform.

Throughout their childhoods, the Fiore siblings saw the sacrifice, service and dedication displayed by their parents as they adjusted to the numerous trials and tribulations which impact military families.

“One of the things that I think drives a lot of young families out of the Army is that they realize that they just can’t manage two careers. Our mother chose to stay at home, even though I know that she missed practicing law and that she was good at it,” said Nicholas.

The smallest of details, such as what he brought with him when he accompanied his mother, remain etched in Nicholas’ mind as he recalls his mother’s tireless dedication to service and helping others, traits that helped shape his childhood. “Even when she transitioned out of the professional sector, she didn’t stop working. She would take me with her, with the little red plastic lunchbox and the Lion King VHS, when she would volunteer on post and still use her skills to help out Soldier families wherever we were.”

Army children are equipped to adapt to present and future changes such as relocations, deployments, reintegration. Despite the obstacles that being part of a military family presents, the Fiore family adapted and ensured that the busy nature of military life did not interfere with childhood excitement and opportunity.

“We moved around a lot and that tends to cause Army children to have one of two reactions, ‘I don’t ever want to move again’ or ‘Hey, it’s kind of cool to travel around the world and see different places’” said Ric. “I think our children enjoyed the traveling piece, so they were not adversely influenced by all the moving and we always made sure that their schools were a priority.”

Although the frequently moving and traveling nature of military families often makes it difficult to forge and adopt a culture, the Fiore family established an identity with the United States Military Academy at West Point.

“When my parents were growing up, West Point was the biggest college nearby, so they went to West Point football games even though they didn’t have a family connection to the Army,” said Nicholas. “I remember going to those tailgates as a kid and that definitely attracted me.”

Growing up in a military family will influence and shape a child’s future as they are immersed within the military lifestyle. Regardless, each of the Fiore siblings retained a sense of independence and individuality as they considered their options, ultimately commissioning into the Army.

“When Nic was applying to colleges, he was looking at St. John’s University and Johns Hopkins University but eventually decided that he wanted to go to West Point. Our sister Elyse decided that going to West Point to be a physician for the Army was what she wanted, to help keep Soldiers healthy and not just go work in a practice somewhere tucked away in a corner of a big office building,” said Nina. “I’ve wanted to fly helicopters since about the time they convinced me I couldn’t be a bird when I grew up, so for me that was a no-brainer.”

Serving as an armor officer, an aviation officer and a medical officer, as the Fiore siblings do, results in very different experiences in the Army. Though these differences and experiences can seem daunting, the Fiore family remains close-knit and supportive of each other through their service.

Author: Pfc. Matthew Marcellus – 1st Armored Division 

Then 2nd Lt. Nicholas Fiore smiles in celebration as his sisters Carolyn Fiore, left, and Elyse Pierre, right, affix his shoulder boards displaying his rank to his uniform shortly after receiving his commission as an armor officer in 2007. Each of the Fiore siblings would attend and graduate from the United States Military Academy, entering the Army as officers and creating a distinct and strong bond between them as they pursued their service. (Photo courtesy Fiore family)
Then 2nd Lt. Elyse Pierre (Fiore) poses as members of her family surround her and affix decorations to her uniform shortly after she received her commission as a medical officer in the Army in 2010. Although each member of the Fiore family has taken their own distinct path in their service, father Uldric as a retired member off the Senior Executive Services and retired Judge Advocate General Colonel, mother Nancy Colfax as a retired lawyer and dedicated Army spouse, and siblings Nicholas, Carolyn and Elyse as armor, aviation and medical officers, respectively, their continued dedication to service and their unique circumstances has brought them together and strengthened them as a family. (Photo courtesy Fiore family)
Capt. Carolyn Fiore, the current commander for Troop D, 3rd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade, embraces her brother Maj. Nicholas Fiore, an armor officer and future operations planner for 1AD, and her father Uldric Fiore a retired member of the Senior Executives Service and retired Judge Advocate General Colonel, after returning to Fort Bliss from a recent deployment. The Fiore family, also including sister Capt. Elyse Pierre, a medical officer and doctor stationed at Fort Stewart, Georgia, and mother Nancy Colfax, a retired lawyer, has found unique opportunities to grow and thrive together as an Army family, bound together by their commitment to selfless service. (Photo courtesy Fiore family)

Honoring an Iron Eagle with Purple Heart Medal, Air Medal with Valor

FORT BLISS, Texas— Spc. Jason Lopez, assigned to the 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade, was presented the Purple Heart Medal and the Air Medal with Valor, Oct. 10.

The medals signify his outstanding actions while carrying out combat operations in Afghanistan in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Lopez returned home after sustaining mission-related injuries in Afghanistan. His recovery has been difficult, but he is making progress, and it has been with the help and support of both his family and leadership.

“They’ve definitely been outstanding leadership to me,” Lopez said. “From checking in, calling me.”

Seeing that support made all the difference to Lopez in his condition as he transitioned home. “Knowing that there are people in the rear [not deployed] that still have your back and care about you,” Lopez said.

Lopez, who comes from a family of veterans who have served for generations, including a member who has spent several tours in Iraq, says that the awards give him a sense of pride and accomplishment.

“An Air Medal, you definitely feel like you accomplished something and had a lasting impact on the mission,” Lopez said.

Lopez’s sacrifice has been recognized by many, even those outside of the Army. The mayor of Lopez’s hometown in Oxnard, California expressed gratitude while Lopez was on leave and intends to honor him in his own way in the future.

Lopez’s dedication to the mission has been an imperative effort to ensuring the CAB’s success. His bravery and efforts are truly appreciated by the Iron Eagle Leadership.

“Lopez’s resilience and courage are why he received the Air Medal with Valor, the Purple Heart, and the Combat Action Badge,” said Lt. Col. Nathanal Patton, the Rear Detachment Brigade Commander. “While he is currently assigned to the Warrior Transition Unit at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, he is, and will remain, an Iron Eagle Soldier.”

Author:  Sgt. Ashton Hofmeister  – 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade 

Food, Water Delivered by Ft Bliss’ Own Iron Eagles in Puerto Rico

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico – Soldiers with 2nd Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade from Fort Bliss, use their capabilities to go into areas not accessible due to poor road conditions to deliver much needed food and water around the island.

The 1AD CAB performs missions throughout Puerto Rico that deliver food, water, and other supplies for life-saving and life-sustaining support to areas hardest hit by Hurricane Maria.

“A lot of us volunteered to come here,” said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Stephen Hanna, a Blackhawk pilot with 1AD CAB. “We are happy to help; my Soldiers are asking for duty day extensions because they are very passionate about helping out.”

While significant progress is being made in the response to Hurricane Maria, recovery for Puerto Rico will require help from federal agencies and the community.

As access to ports, airfields, and roads continue to open more resources will flow into hard hit areas.

A CH-47 Chinook helicopter with the 2nd Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, 1st Armored Division Combat Aviation Brigade, conducts flight test at the Roosevelt Roads Airfield in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, Oct.15, 2017. | U.S. Army photo by: Staff Sgt. Lancelot Lokeni | SGT Michael Eaddy,

The CAB provides their contribution multiple times a week by delivering commodities to communities in the areas most affected by the hurricane.

“I’ve been on two different missions where we’ve delivered water, food, diapers and baby food,” said 1st. Sgt. Jesus Jimenez, a native of Puerto Rico and Headquarters and Headquarters Company’s first sergeant. “We’ll usually land in a baseball park and make our deliveries there.”

The desire to support is a complete unit effort, from the pilots to the most junior Soldier; they are all willing, able, and very eager to get out into the community and serve the people of Puerto Rico, Hanna said.

“I just want to keep flying and help the communities,” said Jimenez. “Not only because they are Americans, but because I grew up here and I want to help.”

Author:  Sgt. Michael Eaddy   |  24th Press Camp Headquarters  | DVIDS

 

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