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Home | Tag Archives: 1st Armored Division

Tag Archives: 1st Armored Division

Meet the Leaders: British Brig. Gen. Leigh R. Tingey -“El Paso is an Amazing Place.”

After just a few short months, British Brig. Gen. Leigh R. Tingey and his family have fallen in love with El Paso and Fort Bliss.

The 48-year-old Cambridge native took over as the new deputy commanding general for maneuver for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss in late August.

“In 28 years in the British Army, I have never seen a relationship as close with the local community as there is between El Paso and Fort Bliss,” he said.

“El Paso is an amazing place. My wife (Kerry) and I have fallen in love with it,” Tingey continued. “The people are so friendly. The weather is glorious. The weather, the culture, the food, the environment and the mountains you have here. We have traveled a bit into the local area – three, four hours away – and it is quite amazing.”

Tingey is just the second general from the United Kingdom to serve as a deputy commanding general for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss. He succeeds British Brig. Gen. Frazer Lawrence, who served as a deputy commanding general for three years.

Tingey’s three children – Ben, 17; Olivia, 15; and William, 13 – are attending boarding school back home in the United Kingdom, but the family reunites every six weeks or so.

It is not uncommon for military children to stay behind and continue attending their same school so they have some sort of continuity in their education, Tingey said.

“From my perspective, my three children love it,” he said. “They thrive in that environment, so it is not that difficult for us.”

The kids also love El Paso, Tingey said. The family is making it a tradition to have dinner at iconic L & J Café either the first or second night after the children fly in for a visit during their breaks in their schooling, Tingey said.

Tingey has also been quite impressed with Fort Bliss and all it offers in terms of training and professional development.

The 1st Armored Division’s professionalism and motivation, its fighting power and the installation’s ability to serve as a platform for training and mobilization all stand out, he said.

He is part of an exchange program between the United Kingdom and the United States.

“It is an important part of building that trust, building that military relationship with what is our primary strategic partner,” Tingey said.

Tingey said he would like to “consolidate this job” and make it a permanent feature that the division always has a general from the United Kingdom serving as a deputy commander.

“I am only the second deputy commanding general in the 1st Armored Division from the United Kingdom,” Tingey said. “I would like to make sure I am succeeded and that this continues for many years to go.”

The division headquarters recently went through its Warfighter exercise at Fort Bliss. This is the headquarters’ version of a National Training Center rotation.

Tingey said it is crucial for the division and all its brigades to transition from a counter-insurgency fight – which has been going on in Iraq and Afghanistan for the past 17 years – to being able to relearn their army-on-army or combined arms skills.

“It is easy to sometimes to concentrate on the threat posed by extreme terrorism and it is a big threat, and I’m not underplaying it in anyway,” Tingey said. “But there are significant other threats we need to be prepared for and deter.”

Tingey’s final goal for his two-year tenure at Fort Bliss is to set the “conditions for future success for the division.”

“As the M — the maneuver deputy commanding general — my primary responsibility to the commanding general is for the long-term planning within the division,” Tingey said. “It is making sure myself and my team are looking 18 months into the future.”

Tingey is a combat engineer by trade and has served in a wide range of units over his career. He also has a background as a trainer.

He has been an instructor for the British version of NTC – called the British Army Training Unit Suffield which is near Calgary, Canada.

There, he helped to teach brigades and battle groups to do armored maneuver.

He also served as an instructor at the British Defence Academy, teaching majors and lieutenant colonels how to conduct division-level operations.

Most recently, Tingey attended the Royal College of Defence Studies for a year. That program is affiliated with King’s College London.

“It is an honor to be here,” Tingey said. “This is such a well-known division – America’s tank division.”

***

Author: David Burge/Special to the El Paso Herald-Post

David Burge is a news producer at ABC-7 in El Paso. He has more than three decades of experience working at newspapers in California, New Mexico and Texas. Covering the military is a particular passion.

Watch for more “Meet the Leaders” profiles in upcoming issues of the El Paso Herald-Post.

Fort Bliss’ 1st Armored Division Participates in Warfighter Exercise

The 1st Armored Division participated in the Warfighter 19-2 exercise, across several training sites here in the sprawling military installation in preparation for future contingency operations.

Warfighter was the culminating event of a series of training exercises held by America’s Tank Division over the past six months. The exercise assessed 1AD’s ability to manage, direct and synchronize across multiple brigades aimed to train and improve operational readiness, warfighting functions, and effectiveness across the Division staff, and units assigned.

“Every Soldier, every process was tested, and we learned a great deal. All of these things are extremely important to the success of our Division and it’s especially great to train with our joint teammates in this environment,” said Maj. Gen. Patrick Matlock, commanding general of the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss.

“When you come to Warfighter you got to take advantage of every minute. We are extremely proud of the men and women of this Division for their excellence and professionalism. The MCTP [Mission Command Training Program] provided us a tough scenario and challenged every section throughout the exercise.”

The Mission Command Training Program team from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, sent several observer-coach/trainers (OC/T’s) to Fort Bliss to oversee the exercise and give expert feedback and guidance to each staff section. Each OC/T is a subject matter expert in their respective field and provides professional insight for the sections’ development.

The 1st Armored Division was evaluated on multiple collective training tasks ranging from maneuvers to communications, staff processes, and establishing and re-establishing its command post between multiple training sites.

Soldiers were also tested on their individual skills sets such as CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) procedures, properly wearing their Mission Oriented Protective Posture gear, setting up firing positions, and collaboration abilities to move the division’s main command post.

“I spent 20 of my 44 years on active duty with this great Division,” said Ret. U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Michael S. Tucker, who served as the senior mentor during the Warfighter 19-2 exercise. “You have warmed my heart, and I could not be more proud of “Old IronSides.”

The most daunting task during Warfighter was the movement of the division’s main command post, which involves transporting large pieces of equipment, and sensitive items such as computers and communications equipment. In additional the movement of dozens of military vehicles and hundreds of personnel can come with many logistical challenges.

“This task is extremely complex because we have operations elements [teams of Soldiers] conducting recon, surveying engineering aspects to secure a location, and the ability to get to terrain.” said Lt. Col. A. Geoff Miller, commander of the Headquarters Battalion, 1st Armored Division.

Miller, a native of Roswell, N.M., added that his Soldiers were vital to ensuring that critical equipment was moved in a timely manner to conduct military operations effectively.

The exercise also served as a learning experience for the unit’s youngest Soldiers.

“The best thing I learned was to keep your composure and trust in your team,” said Pfc. JerMichael Bunch, from Kingston, Penn., who serves as a fire control specialist with the division’s fires section. “You’re always moving, and fire missions accumulate. I didn’t realize how important I was until Warfighter. I like what I do, and I love my section. They prepared me to see the bigger picture.”

The Warfighter exercise was not exclusive to the 1st Armored Division and included several units across the U.S. Army. The 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, the 82nd Airborne Division from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and the III Corps staff from Fort Hood, Texas also participated in this large-scale exercise.

For the Iron Soldiers, this exercise is a key milestone in the division’s ongoing journey of training and operational readiness.

“I’ve seen vast improvements along the way,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Gary Yurgans, senior enlisted advisor of Headquarters Battalion, 1st Armored Division. “We are proud of our preparations and efforts put in by our Soldiers, to work as a team and come together.”

The Warfighter 19-2 exercise ran from November 4-15.

Author: Spc. Karen Lawshae  – 1st Armored Division

Meet the Leaders: Command Sgt. Maj. Rob Cobb ‘Bliss Best Installation I Have Ever Been On’

It took all of about five minutes for Command Sgt. Maj. Rob Cobb and his family to make up their minds that they were going to love their new home of Fort Bliss and El Paso.

“As we were coming in to El Paso, my daughter (Erin) was sitting in the backseat and she is like, ‘I already like this place.’” Cobb said.
“We were coming through where the Fountains mall is at,” Cobb said.

“You could see all the restaurants and shopping areas and all the things. Honestly, five minutes into El Paso, she said, ‘I already like this place.’”

Cobb took over as the senior enlisted leader for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss in August.

He and his family have already been exploring the Borderland area – including hiking in the Franklin Mountains, climbing to the top of Mount Cristo Rey and checking out all the restaurants and shopping in El Paso, he said.

“I can truly say my family has thoroughly enjoyed El Paso,” he said.

Cobb, a 44-year-old from Camden, S.C., has spent most of his career as an airborne noncommissioned officer. He most recently served as the senior enlisted leader for the 1st Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C.

Even though he has only been here about 90 days, Cobb is also seriously impressed with the facilities at Fort Bliss – like the Freedom Crossing shopping center, the Aquatics Training Center and the training area.

These facilities lead the Army and should serve as a model for other installations, he said.

“By far – and if it were not true, I would not say it – this is the best installation I have ever been on,” Cobb said.

The training area is nearly 1 million acres and lends itself to “some phenomenal” opportunities to train and get soldiers and units ready for whatever mission lies ahead, Cobb said.

He has also been impressed by the close relationship between Fort Bliss and the El Paso community – calling it one of the best he has ever seen.

“I thought the one at Fort Bragg was pretty strong,” Cobb said. “But it’s nothing like here.”

Cobb said he his main goal is pretty simple – to help instill a culture of being ready now.

“We have been at war for 17 years,” he said. “We have gotten into the habit of looking at the calendar and saying we are deploying in X month and this is the train-up path we need to go on to get there and we need to be ready then.”

“We can no longer have that mindset,” Cobb said. “We have to be ready all the time. We live in an uncertain world.” That means being ready to deploy to deal with the nation’s enemies or helping out with hurricane relief – like the Combat Aviation Brigade did last year in Puerto Rico, he said.

“Our soldiers at Fort Bliss have to be ready to respond at a moment’s notice,” Cobb said. “We are (ready). We just want to place a renewed emphasis on that and making sure everyone from the lowest private to myself and the commanding general put that laser focus on that.”

*
By David Burge/Special for the Herald-Post

David Burge is a producer at ABC-7 in El Paso. He has more than three decades of experience working in newspapers in California, New Mexico and Texas

Keep an eye out for more “Meet the Leader” profiles in future editions of the Herald-Post.

Meet the Leaders: Brig. Gen. Gallivan ‘Thrilled, Fortunate to be Back at Bliss’

One of the new deputy commanding generals at Fort Bliss has serious ties to the post and is thrilled to be back at what he calls his “Army home.”

Brig. Gen. Jay Gallivan is the new deputy commander general for the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss for operations. Gallivan, age 48, arrived this summer and took over as one of three deputy commanders for the division and installation.

He said he is grateful and excited to be back “serving in this wonderful community and this great installation of teammates.”

“I never thought I’d be so fortunate to be back,” said Gallivan, who was born in the Boston area, but grew up all over as the son of a soldier.

“I am grateful to be back in the 1st Armored Division, to be an Iron soldier, to be part of Fort Bliss, with all the spectacular resident units that are here and be back in El Paso,” he said.

He served at Fort Bliss from 2008-10 as a battalion commander with 1st Battalion, 77th Armored Regiment with what was then 4th Brigade, 1st Armored Division. That brigade has since reflagged to 3rd Brigade.

That stint as a battalion commander included a deployment to Iraq.

Gallivan returned to Fort Bliss in 2013 for a second tour. Almost immediately after arriving back, he deployed to the Middle East and served as the chief of staff for the 1st Armored Division’s forward deployed element in Jordan.  He did that for close to a year and then served as a brigade commander with Fort Bliss’ First Army contingent.

He commanded the 402nd Field Artillery Brigade and then the 5th Armored Brigade after the two units merged and took the latter’s name.  He headed those training brigades – whose primary responsibility is training National Guard and Reserve units before they deploy – from 2014-2016.

Gallivan has been all over the United States and world – first as a child growing up in the Army and then in his own Army career.
He and his family consider Fort Bliss a great place to live and serve.

The people in El Paso and their sense of community really make it stand out, Gallivan said.

“Community is such a beautiful word,” he said.

He is also excited to be back in one of the Army’s most storied divisions and to be part of “this team of teams” at Fort Bliss.

After leaving Fort Bliss, he served as the chief of staff for the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas, and then as a staff officer in Washington, D.C.

As deputy commander for operations, he views his role as serving as a “coach, teacher and mentor” for battalion and brigade commanders at Fort Bliss.

“The bottom line: It is about building readiness – both in the installation and more broadly for the Army,” Gallivan said.
Gallivan’s resume is deep in training experience.

Besides commanding a brigade in the First Army, Gallivan also served as a senior battalion and brigade trainer at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California.

Gallivan said his main goal is to “enable the success of all the command teams across this installation – our division commander, brigade, battalion and company commanders.”

Since arriving at Fort Bliss, Gallivan was promoted to his current rank. He called the promotion humbling.  But mostly he is grateful to continue serving with soldiers at the installation he now likes to call home.

***

Watch for more “Meet the Leaders” profiles in upcoming issues of the El Paso Herald-Post.

By David Burge/Special to the El Paso Herald-Post

Burge is a news producer at ABC-7 in El Paso.  He has worked at newspapers in California, New Mexico and Texas. Covering the military is a particular passion.

El Paso’s Own ‘Bulldog Brigade’ Begins Korean Rotation

The 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division assumed responsibility as the rotational armored brigade combat team in Korea during a transfer of authority (TOA) ceremony on October 22.

Soldiers from the “Bulldog” brigade began arriving here in late September to begin their nine-month rotation.

Bulldog Soldiers replaced the Raider Soldiers of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, who completed their first ever rotation to Korea after U.S. armored brigades began rotating on the Korean peninsula June 2015.

Hosted by Maj. Gen. Scott McKean, a San Jose, California native, commander of 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division, the TOA ceremony completed the mission hand-off between the two armored BCTs.

“Over the last nine months, the Raider brigade from the great Rock of the Marne division, served with honor and distinction,” said McKean. “During their rotation they furthered interoperability with our ROK partners and demonstrated their Soldiers toughness throughout.”

“Raiders, you should be proud of all you’ve accomplished; Our Army is better because of all of your efforts. You are second to none,” he added.

The deployment marked an historic return of 3rd ID Soldiers to the Republic of Korea. This was the first time that Rock of the Marne troops have served in the ROK since fighting throughout the Korean War.

“At Fort Stewart, our battalions are all within walking distance of each other. Here we were split between Camp Humphreys, Camp Casey-Hovey and Rodriguez Live Fire Range with the world’s fifth largest metropolitan area in the middle,” said Col. Mike Adams, commander, 1st ABCT. “Our Soldiers trained and competed in everything they could across Korea.”

He also mentioned that some Raider troops represented 2ID/RUCD at the Sullivan Cup, competed in the military intelligence and best medic competitions, and qualified expert on all weapons platforms.

This will be a new mission for the Bulldog brigade and 1st AD as a whole. Nearly 10 Army units have completed rotations to the Republic of Korea since 2013, including armored brigades and various battalions. Brigade rotations began after the Army deactivated 2ID/RUCD’s organic brigade, the 1st “Iron” Brigade, in 2015.

“Our mission here in the Pacific is remarkable in the regard that it’s the first time a 1st Armored Division unit will conduct operations on the Korean Peninsula,” said Col. Marc A. Cloutier, a Marlborough, Connecticut native, commander, 3rd ABCT. “Many thanks to our new division leadership, the 2nd Infantry Division. We are certainly honored to become part of your storied legacy, Second to None!”

During their time in the ROK, the Bulldog Brigade will support the 2ID/RUCD in maintaining peace on the Peninsula.

“We look forward to building on Raider Brigade’s superb work they’ve done here. We are particularly excited to establish strong relationships with our Republic of Korea partners, and we know that our efforts will have a significant impact here in your country,” concluded Cloutier.

Author:  Staff Sgt. Micah VanDyke  – 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division

‘Soldier Dolls’ Shortens Distance for Dakota Squadron at Fort Bliss

Deployment readiness does not fall solely on the shoulders of a Soldier alone. Family members of deployed Soldiers also have to prepare for the emotional strain at home while they’re separated from their Soldiers for an extended period of time.

One tactic being used by Dakota Squadron is the distribution of Soldier dolls to Families of Soldiers preparing for the unit’s upcoming deployment.

Chaplain (Capt.) Brian Funk and his assistant Spc. Monroig, 2nd Squadron, 13th Cavalry “Dakota,” 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division facilitated the Soldier Doll distribution, Sept. 27, which is designed to shorten the distance between Families and their Soldiers during the unit’s deployment to the Republic of Korea this fall.

“The idea behind it (Soldier Doll Program) is for the dolls to be picked up by the parents and then the photo is inserted into the doll (for their children) to shorten the distance a little for the Soldiers while they’re deployed,” said Chaplain (Capt.) Brian Funk, chaplain for 2nd Squadron, 13th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division.

Sgt. Christopher Smith, cavalry scout with 2nd Squadron, 13th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division and father of a one-year old son and six-year old daughter, is grateful for the program.

“I just want to say thank you to everyone that worked on getting the dolls,” said Smith.

Smith also discusses other events orchestrated by the unit’s family readiness group and ministry team for Families.

“We’ve had a lot of family events that have been going on throughout the Squadron. We had the Spouse Spur Ride a couple weeks ago, and we got to go on a (Strong Bonds) couples retreat, about a month or so ago,” Smith added.

Katie Lubischer, family readiness group leader for Damage Troop, 2nd Squadron, 13th Cavalry Regiment is also very excited about the Soldier Doll program and adds insight from an expecting mother’s perspective.

“I think it’s great. We have a lot of wives that are expecting to give birth, including myself, while they’re gone,” said Lubischer. “I think it’s a great thing to put the picture in so they (the children) can get used to the face.”

A strong support network is important during times of separation and Lubischer and the rest of the Squadron’s Families are ready for the task.

“We’ve built up such a great support network and we also have a lot of events coming up including our Trunk or Treat, I’m so excited,” said Lubischer. “There’s so many things to look forward to and so many things that we’re providing the families with, so I think it’s going to be a great deployment.”

Author: Maj. Anthony Clas – 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division Public Affairs

1st Armored Division Soldiers win 2018 U.S. Army Best Medic Competition

SAN ANTONIO – After more than 72 hours of continuous competition, 27 teams have been narrowed down to one. Staff Sgts. Cory Glasgow and Branden Mettura, 1st Armored Division (1st AD), have won this year’s U.S. Army Best Medic Competition.

The Soldiers’ preparation began long before the start of this competition. Each competitor earned the title Best Medic at their respective commands before continuing their journey to the ABMC at Camp Bullis, Texas.

“I feel super pumped, super excited,” said Glasgow. “This was my fourth time competing.”

“We sat down and studied, specifically TC3 (Tactical Combat Casualty Care),” said Mettura. “We weren’t really prepared for the prolonged primary field care, but luckily Cory has taken some courses, so we really relied on his knowledge and expertise in that area.”

“Prolonged field care is the future of Army Medicine,” Glasgow continued. “I’m going to train my medics in prolonged field care because that’s the new focus. Medics will have to sit with patients for a prolong period of time. They need to focus on how they’re going to save that person’s life.”

“We’re really excited to represent the 1st AD,” said Mettura. “We’re bringing this home to them.”

In a ceremony at Blesse Auditorium on Fort Sam Houston, Command Sgt. Major Michael L. Gragg, U.S. Army Medical Command, talked about how the competitors are the future of Army Medicine.

“As you can see from these great Americans, you can see our future is great,” said Gragg. “For as long as conflict involves humans, there will be Army Medicine. You Soldiers are what make us global, expeditionary, and medically competent. I’m proud of you.”

“Please understand, this competition is a spring board for Army Medicine to continue to care for America’s sons and daughters,” said Gragg.

Staff Sgt. Cory Glasgow and Staff Sgt. Branden Mettura, 1st Armor Division ruck through the terrain during the land navigation course of the 2018 Army Best Medic Competition, Sept. 18, 2018 | U.S. Army photo by David E. Gillespie

For more than two decades, the Army Best Medic Competition has challenged Soldier-Medics throughout the Army in an extreme test of medical and soldier skills.

Originally fashioned after the Army’s Best Ranger Competition, the first Best Medic competition was held in 1994 at Fort McClellan, Alabama.

Competitors must be agile, adaptive leaders who demonstrate mature judgment while testing collective team skills in areas of physical fitness, tactical marksmanship, leadership, warrior skills, land navigation, and overall knowledge of medical, technical and tactical proficiencies through a series of hands-on tasks in a simulated operational environment.

1st Armored Division, America’s Tank Division, is an active component, U.S. Army, armored division located at Fort Bliss, Texas.

The division consists of approximately 17,000 highly-trained Soldiers with a lethal mix of combat capabilities including tanks, artillery, attack helicopters, Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicles, Stryker Combat Vehicles, transport helicopters, and robust sustainment capabilities.

Story by Courtney Dock – U.S. Army Medical Command

Audio+Gallery: Update on Operation Inherent Resolve: The Fight Against ISIS/DAESH

After the liberation of 4.2 million citizens in Iraq and Syria and the recent defeat ISIS forces in the city of Mosul in July, there is still a lot of work to be done, and several more areas need to be liberated from ISIS said Brigadier General Frazer Lawrence.

In March 400 troops from the 1st Armored Division were deployed to Iraq to serve as support and advisory roles for the Iraqi Security Forces in Operation Inherent Resolve. Their deployment is expected to last 9 months.

Lawrence, who spoke with the El Paso Herald Post on Wednesday from Baghdad, said Global Coalition, or the Combined Joint Task Force- Operation Inherent Resolve, will continue working toward the liberation from ISIS in the areas of Tal Afar, Al Qaim and Hawija.

Speaking from Baghdad, Lawrence provided updates on the overall progress of the 1st Armored Division and the coalition and the successes they’ve had in training the Iraqi Security Forces, that ultimately led to the defeat of ISIS in the town of Mosul, Iraq.

The successes, Lawrence said, indicate that the advisory role the coalition has maintained is beginning to shift.

The Brig. General assists in commanding about 5,000 coalition troops in Iraq.

Video+Story: Fort Bliss Replacement Hospital holds Dry-In Ceremony

Leaders with William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Fort Bliss, 1st Armored Division, Army Medicine, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers participated in a Dry-in ceremony at the Fort Bliss Replacement Hospital, July 12.

During the ceremony leaders presented command coins to be placed in a shadow box along with a signed project scroll slated to be featured in the replacement hospital once completed.

“It’s a beautiful Army day to celebrate a significant milestone for the completion of a new world-class medical center here at Fort Bliss,” said Col. Michael Brennan, commander, U.S. Army Health Facility Planning Agency. “It’s due to the hard work and dedication of many hard-working individuals that this magnificent hospital is rising out of the ground.”

The dry-in ceremony, a construction milestone, signifies the hospital’s exterior being dried in and sufficiently completed enough to keep water from entering the building’s enclosure. The exterior’s drying also allows for weather-sensitive construction to begin in the interior of the hospital.

“Staff at WBAMC are working in a facility that was designed decades ago that did not envision modern technology, modern practices, spacing needs and evidence-based designs,” said Brennan. “These features will be included in this new world-class facility.”

A shadow box displaying command coins and a project scroll, slated to be featured in the Fort Bliss Replacement Hospital, commemorates the replacement hospital’s dry-in milestone during a ceremony at Fort Bliss | Photo Credit: Marcy Sanchez

The replacement hospital campus encompasses six major structures consisting of a seven-story hospital, clinical buildings, an administrative building, clinical investigations building and a central utility plant. In addition to the six buildings, a centralized rotunda will connect four of the buildings to provide beneficiaries a seamless transfer of care if needed.

“The WBAMC family and I are eager to see this new hospital’s completion and this ceremony signifies a huge movement in the right direction,” said Col. John A. Smyrski III, commander, WBAMC. “It is fitting that Americas’ Tank Division, our Soldiers and their families, retirees and veterans, and the members of the WBAMC family will have such a magnificent complex to have as their own.”

Once complete, the Fort Bliss Replacement Hospital will join over a century of Army Medicine at Fort Bliss. In the late 1800s the Fort Bliss hospital was erected on Fort Bliss followed by William Beaumont General Hospital located just east of the current WBAMC building in 1921 and the current hospital in 1972.

“Each time I walk through (the replacement hospital) there is always something amazing to see, each time we were closer and closer to completion of our future home,” said Smyrski. “We look forward to writing the next chapter of (WBAMC) history at this new hospital complex.”

The Fort Bliss Replacement Hospital, a campus with over 1.13 million square feet, is slated to replace the current William Beaumont Army Medical Center in late 2019. In addition, the replacement hospital is slated to contain 138 inpatient beds, 10 main operating rooms, 322 exam rooms and 30 specialty clinics to include: women’s health services, behavioral health, physical and occupational therapy, gastroenterology, oncology, hematology, general surgery, family medicine, vascular surgery, plastic surgery, and more.

Author: Marcy Sanchez – US Army

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