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Home | Tag Archives: 2020 census

Tag Archives: 2020 census

Chihuahuita Neighborhood Association wins 2020 Census Virtual Response Challenge

Seven neighborhood associations battled to win the 2020 Census Virtual Response Challenge on Thursday; and while one took the title, all neighborhoods were winners for boosting the area’s census response.

With the highest number of responses, the Chihuahuita Neighborhood Association came out as the top neighborhood filling out their Census questionnaires.

As winners, members of the Chihuahuita Neighborhood Association will celebrate with a pizza party sponsored by El Paso Electric.

The Chihuahuita Neighborhood Association, along with the six competing neighborhood associations, boosted the Census response rates in each of its respective areas of El Paso by encouraging community members to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire with personalized assistance from the Census Bureau during the contest.

“The El Paso Neighborhood Coalition is more engaged with the 2020 Census campaign than ever. The Neighborhood Coalition is part of a resilient community and adaptability that defines us,” President of the Neighborhood Coalition Fabiola Campos Lopez states,

“For that same reason, we are dedicated to support with the Virtual Questionnaire Assistance platforms and resources made available by the U.S. Census to succeed in our mission: to reach a 100% Complete Count.”

Communities benefit the most when the census counts everyone. A complete and accurate Census count helps determine political representation and impacts how billions of dollars in federal funds are distributed to communities each year towards critical needs in the area:

  • Helping to put roads
  • Parks in the neighborhood
  • Hospitals where they are needed most
  • New schools in the area and other vital programs.

Local census officials said the collaboration efforts between the U.S. Census Bureau and the El Paso Neighborhood Coalition for the 2020 Census Response Challenge demonstrate the unified efforts to support Census participation in El Paso where low respond rates may be present.

“The Neighborhood Associations are Trusted Voices in the city which help build stronger communities through advocacy and by organizing activities within their neighborhoods,” officials added.

The Census Bureau strongly encourages the public to respond online at 2020census.gov, by phone, or by completing and returning the paper form by mail.

The seven participating neighborhood associations in the competition were:

  • Southside Neighborhood Association
  • Borderland Neighborhood Association
  • Chivas Town Neighborhood Association
  • North Hills Neighborhood Association
  • Chihuahuita Neighborhood Association
  • Playa Neighborhood Association
  • Pueblo Viejo Neighborhood Association

Aoy celebrates Statistics in Schools Week with Census activity

As this week was National Statistics in Schools Week, students at Aoy took the opportunity to learn more about how the facts and figures from the U.S. Census help schools and communities like theirs.

Officials from the El Paso office of Census 2020 visited the Segundo Barrio school to helps students learn more about how the population of the country is counted and how those numbers impact their family.

Students kicked off the lessons by doing a singalong about the importance of having a complete count in the census before breaking off in small groups to have a hands-on activity about population shifts.

“They’re learning statistics, math, social studies and even civics using these important lessons,” said Aoy teacher Alejandra Escalera. “But they’re also learning about how important participating in the census is, and they can take that message back home to their parents.”

Aoy is a community being targeted by Census officials in order to increase participation in the count.

Photo courtesy EPISD

Census Day is April 1, and the city is expecting a celebration to kick off the counting of El Pasoans. The online version of the census will open on March 12.

EPISD is partnering with the Census Bureau and the Paso Del Norte Complete Count Committee to help spread awareness about the upcoming count.

The goal is to have broad participation in the census and help secure adequate funding form the federal government to El Paso.

Census results help determine representation in local, state and federal legislative bodies, and also factor in the dissemination of billions of dollars in funding into states and communities.

Several EPISD schools are planning activities around the census, and many campuses will have mock census counts on April 1.

Story and photo by Gustavo Reveles

MAXIMUS to Hold a Census Hiring Fair in El Paso

As the 2020 Census approaches, a nationwide firm is set to hold a hiring fair to recruit seasonal contact center employees to assist in the in the once every decade tally.

MAXIMUS, a provider of government services worldwide, has partnered with the U.S. Government to recruit Spanish-speaking, seasonal Contact Center Employees to Assist in 2020 Census.

“We are hiring for a variety of seasonal jobs, including inbound/outbound agents, call center support staff, trainers and supervisory staff. To be eligible you must be 18 years of age, able to work in the U.S. and successfully pass the Census Bureau suitability screening,” MAXIMUS officials shared via their website.

Every ten years, the U.S. Federal Government conducts a full census of every person in the country. The census results control the number of Representatives in the U.S. Congress apportioned to each state.

Population counts also factor heavily into assigning billions of dollars in federal spending to state and city governments.

Those interested in applying to work for MAXIMUS as part of the 2020 Census can apply via this link or attend the upcoming job fair.

WHEN:           February 18, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

WHERE:         12 Founders Boulevard  |  El Paso, TX 79906

2020 Census provides job opportunities for Texans Age 50-Plus

AUSTIN – Nearly 100 days are left before the 2020 Census count begins, and advocates for Texans over age 50 say this massive undertaking is an opportunity for people looking for short-term work.

Tina Tran, state director of AARP Texas, says her organization is helping older residents who want to get involved to become census-takers in their communities.

“The Census is a great opportunity for particularly older workers who are looking for flexible work and short-term work,” says Tran. “And the Census is looking at adding about 500,000 temporary workers.”

Texas is one of five states in the nation that has chosen not to establish a statewide “Complete Count” committee, tasked with increasing awareness and motivating residents to participate in the 2020 Census.

Without a state count committee, Tran adds it’s even more important that schools and local organizations ensure all families are educated about the census.

“It is really important that we get an accurate count, because resources and representation is on the line,” says Tran. “Our officials estimate that even a 1% undercount could result in lost millions of dollars for our state.”

Tran points out that understanding how the census works can help protect people against potential scams. For instance, she says the Census Bureau doesn’t send emails to individuals, and if you receive an email claiming to be from the census, it’s a scam.

“Often, scammers will use this as a way to get access to your Social Security number,” says Tran. “They also may ask for bank account or credit card numbers. The census will not demand any money or threaten any jail time for not participating.”

If you suspect a scam, Tran says contact the Census Bureau and your local police department. You can also call the AARP Fraud Watch Network hotline at 877-908-3360.

Author – Nadia Ramlagan, Public News Service – TX  
Disclosure: AARP Texas contributes to our fund for reporting on Energy Policy, Health Issues, Livable Wages/Working Families, Senior Issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

Texans fighting citizenship question on 2020 census are headed to court. Here’s what you need to know.

Opponents of adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census won big last week when a New York-based federal judge ordered the Trump administration to remove the controversial question from the once-a-decade count.

Now, a group of Texans is hoping to set the stage for a second victory.

In a federal courtroom in Maryland on Tuesday, lawyers representing the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, the Senate Hispanic Caucus and several Texas-based nonprofits that advocate for Latino and Asian residents will set out to convince U.S. District Judge George Hazel that the federal government’s decision to ask about citizenship status as part of the upcoming census is improper, because it will lead to a disproportionate undercount of immigrants and people of color.

The Texas legal battle has run mostly parallel to several other court fights across the country — and might not be decided before the New York case makes it to the U.S. Supreme Court — but it’s the only census case that could ultimately determine whether Trump administration officials conspired to deprive people of color of equal protection and representation.

Here’s a primer on the case involving the group of Texans and what the New York ruling means for the legal fight:

What’s the Texas case about?

What we’re referring to as the “Texas case” is actually two consolidated cases filed in Maryland — one of which was filed on behalf of more than a dozen plaintiffs, including Texas’ legislative Latino caucuses; legislative caucuses out of Maryland, Arizona and California; and several community organizations. La Unión del Pueblo Entero, a nonprofit organization based in the Rio Grande Valley, is the lead plaintiff.

Those plaintiffs are challenging the inclusion of the citizenship question on several fronts, alleging it violates the U.S. Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause, the Enumeration Clause and a federal law that governs federal agencies and their decision-making processes.

More broadly, they argue the citizenship question will lead to a disproportionate undercount of Hispanic and immigrant households, affecting areas of the country like Texas that are more likely to be home to members of those communities, and that officials’ decision to add the question was unconstitutional because it was based on intentional racial discrimination. They go further than other opponents in also alleging that Trump administration officials conspired to add the question to the 2020 questionnaire based on animus against Hispanics and immigrants, particularly when it comes to counting immigrants for the apportionment of political districts.

The federal government, which has been unsuccessful in its repeated requests to dismiss the case, has argued the question is necessary for “more effective enforcement” of the federal Voting Rights Act and was added at the Justice Department’s request. But evidence that emerged through litigation indicated U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross asked the Justice Department to make that request after he was in touch with advisers to President Donald Trump.

What about the ruling against the federal government in the New York case?

The trial in Maryland comes on the heels of a major ruling in another census lawsuitout of New York, where a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to remove the citizenship question from the 2020 questionnaire.

In the New York case, U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman scolded the Trump administration for “egregious” violations of the Administrative Procedure Act, the federal law the Texas plaintiffs are also citing, and described Ross’ decision to add the question as “arbitrary and capricious.” Furman, however, ruled there wasn’t enough evidence to prove that Ross had intentionally acted to discriminate againstimmigrants and people of color.

The Texas case is moving forward despite the New York ruling because it involves allegations that the courts haven’t addressed. The New York lawsuit — filed on behalf of a coalition of more than 30 states, cities and counties, including El Paso, Hidalgo and Cameron — didn’t include some of the legal claims opponents in Texas are leaning on.

Experts have said the New York ruling could influence ongoing census battles by helping to guide judges working through the issues in other cases. At a minimum, the New York ruling could interrupt the timeline of those other cases. The Justice Department has appealed the ruling, and the case could ultimately go to the Supreme Court.

All eyes are on the clock. Census Bureau officials have indicated they need to finalize the questionnaire this summer as they prepare materials for the 2020 headcount.

In the New York case, U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman scolded the Trump administration for “egregious” violations of the Administrative Procedure Act, the federal law the Texas plaintiffs are also citing, and described Ross’ decision to add the question as “arbitrary and capricious.” Furman, however, ruled there wasn’t enough evidence to prove that Ross had intentionally acted to discriminate againstimmigrants and people of color.

The Texas case is moving forward despite the New York ruling because it involves allegations that the courts haven’t addressed. The New York lawsuit — filed on behalf of a coalition of more than 30 states, cities and counties, including El Paso, Hidalgo and Cameron — didn’t include some of the legal claims opponents in Texas are leaning on.

Experts have said the New York ruling could influence ongoing census battles by helping to guide judges working through the issues in other cases. At a minimum, the New York ruling could interrupt the timeline of those other cases. The Justice Department has appealed the ruling, and the case could ultimately go to the Supreme Court.

All eyes are on the clock. Census Bureau officials have indicated they need to finalize the questionnaire this summer as they prepare materials for the 2020 headcount.

What’s at stake for Texas?

The electoral and financial future of the state are tied to an accurate census, which determines everything from political boundaries to how much funding the state gets from the federal government. But demographers and experts have warned that the inclusion of the citizenship question would depress response rates among Texas immigrants and their families, even if they’re authorized to live in the country.

In the New York ruling, Furman wrote that the evidence presented by the Trump administration itself confirmed that including the citizenship question would result “in a significant reduction” in responses by Hispanic and immigrant households.

An undercount in Texas, which has long been considered a hard-to-count state, would be deeply detrimental to Texans’ political clout.

Census data is used to determine how many representatives Texas is entitled to elect to Congress. It dictates how many electoral votes are assigned to the state. And the Texas Legislature and local governments rely on the data to adjust corresponding political boundaries.

An undercount in Texas could jeopardize one or more of the three congressional seats the state is projected to gain because of population growth.

The census also serves as a roadmap for the distribution of billions of federal dollars to the state and to local communities, including funding for low-income housing, medical assistance and transportation projects. But Texas leaders could end up with fewer funds to pay for the needs of a growing population if they’re not all accounted for in the formulas used to dole out that money.

Author:  ALEXA URA – The Texas Tribune

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