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Friday , August 17 2018
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Tag Archives: cisd

Canutillo ISD Awarded for Outstanding Financial Reporting

For the second consecutive year, Canutillo ISD was awarded the Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting (COE) by the Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO).

“This award recognizes the excellent reporting by our dedicated finance staff,” Canutillo ISD Chief Financial Officer Martha Piekarski said. “The report informs our stakeholders about the healthy financial state of the district, making it an important tool for displaying transparency, building trust, and engaging with the community.”

ASBO International’s COE recognizes districts that have met the program’s high standards for financial reporting and accountability. CISD earned the Certificate of Excellence for its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for the 2017 fiscal year.

The District was recognized for the demonstration of their commitment to financial transparency. The CAFR is reviewed by a team of professional auditors, who provide feedback to improve future documents. If the CAFR meets the requirements of the program, the document may receive the Certificate of Excellence.

A district’s participation in the COE program can facilitate bond rating and continuing bond disclosure processes.

Canutillo ISD is proposing a balanced budget for the 2018-19 school year. And, the Canutillo ISD Board of Trustees recently approved an increase of the starting pay for teachers to $50,000 including a 2 percent general pay increases for all employees.

Microsoft Selects EPCC’s Clint Early College Academy for New Partnership

El Paso Community College’s (EPCC) Clint Early College Academy was selected to a new partnership with  Microsoft’s Technology, Education, and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) program, which helps high schools build and grow sustainable computer science programs through partnerships between classroom teachers and technology industry volunteers.

Edmond Martinez, Principal of Clint ISD Early College Academy, a school that has long embraced the need for strong science, technology, engineering, and math programs, sees the teaching of computer science as a duty to the next generation, and encourages local technology experts step up to volunteer.

“We have a responsibility to create pathways for our students from high school, through college, and to professional positions,” Martinez said. “Technical knowledge and skills prepare our students for the jobs of today and tomorrow, to solve serious problems, and create new opportunities for humanity. It’s my hope that many of those in our community who have technology training will sign up to volunteer with TEALS this fall. What could be more rewarding than passing on your skills the next generation of innovators?”

“Our region is fortunate to have terrific schools, which will be even stronger with the addition of a program that teaches one of the key skills young people will need to be successful in our increasingly technology driven world,” said J.J. Childress, the El Paso manager of Microsoft’s TechSpark program to foster greater economic opportunity and job creation in six communities in the United States.

“We know teachers want to teach computer science, but it can be challenging to find the time and resources to learn the subject. TEALS addresses this by putting trained technology volunteers into classrooms to teach students, while helping teachers prepare to teach the subject on their own.”

The program will launch this fall at Clint ISD Early College Academy.

 

Op-Ed: Why Public Schools Need Marketing Firms

A few months back on a local blog, the blog author and guests wrote and responded with some indignation about a local school district hiring a “marketing firm.” “Why would a school district need a marketing firm?” they asked with annoyance.

“Surely this money should be spent in the classroom! This is an outrage!” Grumble. Grumble. “Oh, and by the way the superintendent makes too much money and all administrators need to be fired.” Grumble. Grumble.

Being a blog that mostly caters to angry-at-local-politics folks, or people that are just angry in general for having to pay any taxes at all for anything, the echo-chamber cacophony of agreement crescendoed into a roar of annoyance and outrage. Soon, every response was based on agreeing the blog entry itself, with little or no reflection or critical thinking. Anyone trying to counter the argument was immediately branded a suck up, a traitor, or insulted as being “out of touch.”

Rational discourse was not welcome there. No need to respond if you disagreed or had an alternative point of view. The collective minds of the blog mass was already made up. The responses to the blog post went something like this:

“If those schools would just do their jobs, they wouldn’t need a marketing firm!”

“If the schools are losing students, so be it. If they were any good, they
wouldn’t be losing anyone!”

“They didn’t need marketing firms in my day! And look how well I turned
out!”

“Get off my lawn! And fire the superintendent!”

“Yeah, I agree with everything he just said. Ditto!

As EdChoice put it in an article about education marketing: “Shame on schools for trying to get students in their classrooms! Everyone knows those students should just show up, sit down and learn regardless of whether the learning environment is right for them.”

The original kernel of the blog post was actually a good question: “Why would a public school district would want to hire a marketing or “branding” firm?”

Actually, if you dive just a little bit deeper into the topic, “marketing” is not such a bad idea especially in these days of school districts that are under attack from a variety of forces: private schools, home schoolers, angry politicians, but mostly privately owned charter schools. For a public school district to hire a marketing firm to make sense however, you have to think critically about WHY a district would want to market it’s services. It comes down to the reason ANY business or organization would want to market itself: Getting more customers.

In many school districts across the nation, educators are faced with a multitude of forces aligning up in ways that school districts in the past 60 or so post WWII years probably would never have had to think about. Those include:

Loss of students:

In public schools, the students in the seats are the way that the schools make their money. More students mean more money. Less students mean less money.(link)

Think of students like a business thinks of customers. One district in the city has been losing students at the rate of about 1000 per year due to several reasons including major demographic changes in the city. As the oldest school district in the area, the base population is getting older and moving away from the city center towards the outskirts of town where the newer houses, stores, entertainment, and parks are.

Those “outskirts” also are home to other schools districts. Families moving to newer neighborhoods are moving away from the district. Older folks just don’t have babies plain and simple. The post WWII baby boom which fueled the rise of large urban school districts has given way to suburban sprawl and the relocation of younger families to less expensive outlying communities.

Legislative processes fighting against public education:

In the past, there was a strong bipartisan legislative ethic that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, to give it a Star Trek spin. Recently in Texas, along with quite a few mainly Republican, Tea Party controlled states like Kansas and Wisconsin, the legislature has decidedly become anti-public education. The needs of the well heeled few and corporations are becoming more important than the many.

A recent Texas Tribune article sums up the ed funding battle this way:

“The funding challenge facing districts like Kelton, as well as the unique pot of money they are set to lose in three months, stems from decisions by state officials made over a decade ago. In 2006, the Legislature compressed tax rates by a third, after the Texas Supreme Court ordered them to alleviate the high property tax rates in local school districts. They also created a state aid program to make up the extra revenue districts lost by lowering tax rates.”

In their Tea Party fueled fervor, the Texas legislature (along with MANY other GOP controlled state legislatures) has cut funding for students, cut taxes that paid for education, added funding for charter schools, made raising taxes much more difficult than in the past, and generally have decided that public education is not the investment in the future as they once viewed it, although the vast majority of them are products of the exact public school system they say is “broken.”

The idea of the collective good in education has gone on life support and with it, equitable funding. Districts are left with trying to pull funds from an ever increasingly smaller pot. Rich districts in rich suburbs of Houston and Dallas thrive, while those in the Valley, along the Rio Grande and rural areas have to try to succeed using an increasingly smaller pot of funds to draw from.

Charter schools:
Charter schools, no matter what anyone might say otherwise, take funds from public schools by taking students from public schools. (Books have been written about whether charter schools are academically better or not, but in terms of simply sucking money from traditional public school districts, they are poison.) A student that goes to a charter school takes their funding with them.

In El Paso, not only brick and mortar but online charter schools will dig into the “butts-in-seats” funding that is the life blood of public education. The math is simple: If a student is attending an online school, or another school outside your district, you don’t get money for that student.

Charter schools, many backed with not only public funds as well as private funds, can afford to market themselves and have done so aggressively using professional marketing firms, also know as “branding firms.”

How does a school district fight back against demographic changes, a hostile legislature, and a new opponent that does not have to play by the same rules that you have to?

One way would be to just sit back and think that the issue will correct itself over time and go away. This is a poor strategy, much like allowing your opponent to run up the score in the first three quarters thinking you will be able to outscore them in the fourth.

That strategy rarely works. As poor a strategy as it may seem, it is one that many school districts seem to think is viable. Do nothing. Just teach. It will all be fine.

The problem is that while you sit back and do nothing, your competition is advertising about how good they are, with slickly produced ads that beckon parents to give that shiny new charter school a chance.

Consider this ad for Odyssey Charter Schools:

Slick, modern, and tempting. Ads like that are done, for Charter schools, by marketing companies, or branding companies. One should ask, why is it okay for charters, who use public funds, to create marketing, but not for public school districts?

One study in Pennsylvania found that charter schools spend on average, $48 per student per year on advertising.
IDEA Public Charter Schools are in the El Paso area.

They are not shy about advertising:

Planning:
Another way is to create a series of strategic moves that by themselves seem disparate, but when put together make a cohesive plan to bring students back into the district.

The first step is, of course, to have a strong academic program, and to provide services to students that might not be found elsewhere. In El Paso for instance, the EPISD is addressing that issue by bringing in several programs that are unique to the area: International Baccalaureate schools at the middle school level, as well as becoming the largest New Tech High district in the US. The district is also becoming a 1:1 in all secondary campuses, among other things, like having a dual language program at all 54 elementary campuses across the city.

Open Enrollment:
Another step is to allow students from anywhere to come to your district. This is called “open enrollment” and it allows students from anywhere to enroll. Surprisingly enough, in Texas, public schools default to a “closed enrollment” model where students only living in the boundaries of the school district are allowed to attend.

A district has to declare itself “Open Enrollment” to allow other students to attend. Once you have good academic programs in place (that is the most difficult and takes the most time by the way), and you have declared yourself an “open enrollment” district, the students will just start piling into your schools right?

Wrong.

Like any business, you need to advertise. You can have the best product in the world, but if no one knows about it, no one will buy it.

You no doubt have been in a business that has great “word of mouth;” that mystical advertising method where people tell their friends who tell their friends who tell their friends about it. That is a great strategy at first, but after a few months, that business, if it relied solely on people telling their friends how wonderful it is, probably is on financial ropes and is headed for disaster.

They have to advertise some other way, otherwise they will fail. The “build it and they will come” mentality for business and now public schools only works in the movies with ghost baseball players and Kevin Costner.

An article in Forbes Magazine stated exactly why school districts need to market themselves:

“For generations, the thought of a school district hiring outreach help was anathema. Especially during the Baby Boom, educators had one constituency to court: parents. With half the homes in many communities having school age children, the need to fund public schools was obvious. Now, however, it’s not unusual for many districts to have fewer than 30% of households with children in the public schools. Losing their core parental constituency has forced school boards and administrators to embrace social media and move beyond traditional newsletters to explain their value to the broader community.”

That is exactly why school districts need to market themselves. What is the point of creating modern learning spaces, having great academic programs, and not telling your larger community or people looking to move into your area about it?

And telling your community is more than just sending out tweets and posting on Facebook. It is an entire broad based strategy that encompasses every type of media available; something marketing firms do.

The educational landscape has changed. And with it, the need to tell the community about their services has changed as well. School districts can no longer afford to be in a passive role when it comes to marketing their wares.

The idea of marketing education is not a new one. Public universities have been marketing their programs for years and no-one bats an eye.

Here is an example of my local university marketing it’s athletic programs:

 

Even publicly funded community colleges, market themselves because they know that they are in competition with tech and trade schools as well as with universities:

As an article in Public School Review stated last year:

“Ultimately, the trend towards public school marketing signals an important recognition on the part of schools that students and their families have choices, and they are increasingly able to have a say in their own educations. In a prescient 1999 report on privatization in education, the MacKinac Center for Public Policy noted that “in an era of expanded educational freedom, families must now be treated as customers with choices and not as captive audiences.”

Families must be treated as customers with choices and not as captive audiences.

Public schools, if they plan on growing, or even just staying where they are, must advertise and market themselves, like any business. Advertising requires marketing, and good marketing requires hiring people or companies with those exact set of skills. School district are mostly made up of educators, not marketers.

Large scale marketing is a separate set of skills that most educators or school districts, simply do not have.

The irony of all this, especially on the blog that I mentioned earlier, is that those same angry anti-everything commenters will be the first to say something to the effect that “school districts need to be run like businesses.” When a school district does EXACTLY that, the same angry readers get even angrier.

Marketing is no longer a “nice to have.” It is a “need to have” for public school districts. To think otherwise would be a fool’s errand.

***

Author: Tim Holt is an educator and writer, with over 33 years experience in education and opines on education-related topics here and on his own award-winning blog: HoltThink. He values your feedback. Feel free to leave a comment.  Read his previous columns here.

Canutillo ISD Leader Named Region 19 Assistant Principal of the Year

Jessica Meléndez-Carrillo, Assistant Principal at Congressman Silvestre & Carolina Reyes Elementary School was recently selected as Assistant Principal of the Year in Region 19 by the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association (TEPSA).

Carrillo is being recognized among her peers for her exceptional leadership in the day-to-day operations of Reyes Elementary, instilling pride in the school’s accomplishments and reinforcing their leadership in helping children develop a lifelong love of learning. She says she is living the dream working in Canutillo with stellar educators whose goal is student success.

“​I’ve had the honor to start my professional career in Canutillo ISD and get to know the community,” Carrillo said. “I am able to attain such an honor because I have learned from the best team of teachers, administrators, custodians, cafeteria staff, aides, librarians and counselors. Every single day is a new opportunity for learning and growth.”

Each year, TEPSA Region Assistant Principals of the Year have the opportunity to apply for the National Assistant Principal of the Year Award, a recognition program produced in partnership with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). Carrillo will attend the Awards Reception June 13 during the TEPSA Summer Conference in Austin, Texas.

“I am always looking for ways to learn more and grow professionally in order to do a better job for our students and the community,” Carrillo said. “I look forward to representing Canutillo ISD and Region 19 this summer at the TEPSA Conference.”

Reyes Elementary Students Train to Run, Empower Themselves

Girls at Congressman Silvestre and Carolina Reyes Elementary School are running to learn and be empowered thanks to several local health and leadership organizations around El Paso.

The Junior League of El Paso partnered with the El Paso Center Against Sexual and Family Violence to bring a Girls on the Run council to El Paso. According to Jessica Arvizu, an advocate with the Center, Girls Going the Distance is a life skills development pilot program based on the Girls on the Run model. Through a mentoring relationship centered on running, the program uses dynamic, interactive lessons and running games, to inspire and motivate girls and encourage lifelong health and fitness and build confidence through accomplishment.

RES Assistant Principal Jessica Melendez-Carrillo said they have about 35 3rd-5th grade girls in the 10-week program that is designed to inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident, using various lessons addressing self-care, self-esteem, positive relationships and empowerment.

At the end of the program, the girls will participate in the Flying Horse 5K Race organized by Race El Paso November 18, 2017 in Anthony, Texas and New Mexico. Junior League member Danielle Adams was on hand to train and run with the girls.

“This is about empowering girls to not only be physical, healthy and strong but also brings the goal of accomplishing something,” Adams said. “The girls are going to be awesome in this run!”

The girls also received generous donations of brand new running shoes, socks and t-shirts from the Braden Aboud Memorial Foundation while Race El Paso provided the girls discounted registration fees for the race.

“Reyes Elementary is so excited to have this program here this year and appreciates all the effort from every organization that made this possible for the girls,” Melendez-Carrillo said

REPLAY: Greater El Paso Football Showcase Draft (Parts 1 & 2)

Thanks to our partners over at HSZone.TV,  high school football fans will be able to watch the Greater El Paso Football Showcase’s first-ever draft on both our websites.

From the unveiling of the team names, to the first picks and on through the five rounds, you can catch all the draft action!

The broadcast is available to fans via any web-enabled device. No App Needed. Just Log On and Watch the Fun.

Part 2 of the draft is below:

Canutillo ISD Physical Therapist Supports Student Access to Educational Environment

Walking, running, lifting and playing are skills that one third grader in Canutillo does not take for granted. As a student, Lucas faces many challenges when it comes to the basic physical skills he needs to access his education.

But, with a little help from a big heart, he moves closer to success.

When Lucas was evaluated for age appropriate gross and fine motor skills by Canutillo ISD Physical Therapist Harriet Baumann, DPT, it was determined that he was developmentally delayed. Baumann, in her seventh year with CISD and the only physical therapist in the District, has worked with Lucas since he was three years of age on areas such as his range of motion, strength and balance. She explains the role the District plays in the lives of students like Lucas.

“The primary focus of physical therapy as a related service in the educational environment differs from clinical physical therapy,” Baumann explained. “Physical therapy in schools is used to support the student’s educational program to ensure access to learning activities.”

Students are supported in their daily routine at school through accommodations and modifications to their environment.  This includes direct PT services on their campus and indirect services such as recommendations for appropriate adaptive equipment for home and school, procuring the equipment through Medicaid, private insurance, charities or private funds, as well as staff, student and parent education on its use to facilitate success and learning.

“We are here to make sure that each child has better and safer access to their educational environment – anything that helps them get to their classroom or their desk,” Baumann said. “Here in Canutillo, we integrate students into the school community. We support the educational program. Physical therapy is not the program.”

Physical therapists look at the students’ needs for safe positioning, transfers, mobility, endurance and self-help skills. This may include support of adaptive equipment for function, rest, comfort, access, and specific training for students, staff members and families. Baumann also says that education is one of the major parts of her job educating parents or staff about obesity, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders and how they affect them as well as precautions to take with the child in the classroom.

“We focus on the child and family’s goals within the educational and community setting,” Baumann added. “I educate them about services and equipment that are available to them – to see that we can support the family as a unit. It’s fun to watch them grow together over the years and change.”

Lucas’ father, Tim, is happy to see Lucas, who was diagnosed with a chromosomal syndrome, make progress.

“Lucas has improved a lot. We are very thankful for the services the District and Mrs. Baumann has provided,” Tim said. “She helped us get an adaptive tricycle. He loves the trike and we take him for rides.”

In addition to her regular duties as a physical therapist, “Harri” coordinates with a dedicated group of advocates to lead Team Canutillo in the Greater El Paso Special Olympics where Lucas participated for the first time this year.

“It was very joyful for us to see Lucas participate in the events. It brought tears to our eyes. We’re happy that Canutillo is involved in the Special Olympics,” Tim added.

Baumann cannot contain the rewarding feelings she has helping students learn in their environment.

“The best part of my day is when all of a sudden, something just clicks with a student and we hit a milestone,” Baumann expressed. “Lucas has made tremendous progress in functional access and his motor skills. Every day I come to work, I can’t believe I am fortunate enough to have made this is my profession. I think have the most rewarding job in Canutillo.”

National Physical Therapy Month is observed in October. For more information on physical therapy tips to get moving or keep moving for life, visit the American Physical Therapy Association Move Forward website.

Canutillo ISD Writing Collaborative Featured in State Publication

Writing-to-learn has become an innovative instructional strategy at Canutillo ISD and the District’s success story has been published in the Write for Texas: Success Stories from a Literacy Initiative 2014-2017 publication.

This year, in collaboration between the West Texas Writing Project (WTWP) at the University of Texas at El Paso, Canutillo ISD led an ongoing district literacy initiative designed to support the improvement of reading and writing instruction.

The published snapshot showcases a successful aspect of the state-wide writing initiative at Canutillo to document and recognize the work of the Write for Texas site and to inform and inspire other educators to adopt similar practices. Canutillo English Language Arts (ELA) and Reading Coordinator Natalie Spalloni says it is a major honor to be included in the Write for Texas Literacy publication.

“The partnership with UTEP flourished into a professional collaboration across all our secondary campus educators,” Spalloni said. “It is refreshing to have a shared conception that writing to learn is a legitimate instructional strategy.”

The Canutillo Curriculum and Instruction team used educational articles to elicit dialogue about writing instruction in relation to collaborative strategies that the teachers practiced. In addition to supporting the teachers’ own professional learning, the activities selected could be adapted for student instruction.

Spalloni explained to the publication that writing across the curriculum typically refers to process writing that is meant to be published and reflects a purpose and format particular to a content area such as a Science lab report or a Social Studies essay. Writing-to-learn activities, however, are short, informal writing tasks such as a notecard, foldable or chart that help students think through or process learning about key concepts or ideas presented in a course.

Through the professional development offered by Spalloni, groups of teachers from very different content areas reached a shared understanding of the definition of writing-to-learn. They understood how the strategies could be used to promote and measure student learning. She said that teachers gave anecdotal reports about the positive impact of the workshops.

One social studies teacher who participated in a workshop about collaborative annotation was eager to implement the strategy the next day. A middle school teacher who was originally hesitant to implement writing to learn in science class later shared his success with using the techniques. He reported that student engagement had increased and he was impressed by the volume of writing that they produced.

“In the past, formal writing instruction was taught in isolation, but now we see how integrating either low or high stakes writing into all units of content instruction offers educators immediate, authentic feedback from students about their individual level of content understanding,” Spalloni added. “It is exhilarating when teachers from varying content areas see me in the halls and ask me if we are having a writing workshop.”

A link to the entire publication and Canutillo snapshot can be downloaded here.

Canutillo Alumni Award Thousands in College Scholarships

Seven graduating seniors from Canutillo High School and Northwest Early College High School received $1,000 scholarships each from the Canutillo Alumni Foundation for Education (CAFÉ) and the Classes of 1994 and 2006 to attend college.

Oscar Moreno, Canutillo High School class of 2006, said that when his class got together for their 10-year reunion, they came up with ways to give to current CHS graduates who are headed to college.

“This is a prime example of Canutillo greatness and pride,” Moreno said. “These students demonstrate great potential and I know they will be a positive reflection to our community. We are a united community built on humility, honesty, and care, looking to push our future generations to do great things, not only for Canutillo, but for the El Paso community in general.”

The Class of 1967 will be celebrating their 50th reunion on Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the Sunland Park Racetrack and Casino Ballroom. The alumni teamed up with the Canutillo Optimist Club to raise money for scholarships and the community.

Class of 1967 graduate Teddy Martinez says that her class tries to get together once a year and always has their community in mind.

“I am very proud to belong to CAFÉ and give out so many scholarships,” Martinez said. “We hope to increase participation from other classes to do the same.”

Since 2004, more than $109,000 has been raised by the group and awarded to about 144 students. The Canutillo alumni association holds an annual golf tournament in the fall to raise funds for the scholarship. The Classes of 1994 and 2006 also raised money as part of their reunion activities.

The reunion celebration is open to all the community and tickets are on sale for $30. Call Teddy at 503-3067 for more information.

Texas Education Agency Designates Canutillo ISD 6 through 12 T-STEM District

Canutillo ISD announced that the Texas Education Agency has designated Canutillo Middle School as a Texas Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (T-STEM) academy.

The middle school joins Canutillo High School, who is in its second year in the same T-STEM designation, making the District one of only a few in the state of Texas to have a sixth through twelfth grade T-STEM track.

T-STEM Academies are rigorous secondary schools focusing on improving instruction and academic performance in science and mathematics-related subjects and increasing the number of students who study and enter STEM careers.

Canutillo Middle School was designated based on a rigorous designation process by TEA requiring the campus to meet a number of benchmarks in relation to STEM such as mission-driven leadership, T-STEM culture and student and teacher retention. CMS Principal Mark Paz is excited about this (T-STEM) designation.

“This program will help students be better prepared for their transition to the high school STEM program,” Paz said. “This will also give colleges a good indicator that the students have gone through a rigorous process since the sixth grade.”

With the T-STEM designation, CMS will be provided with professional development and technical assistance to serve as demonstration schools and learning labs to showcase innovative instruction methods which integrate technology and engineering into science and mathematics instruction.

Earlier this month, the middle school was also awarded a Project Lead the Way Gateway grant for $20,000 made possible by Verizon Innovative Learning through the 2018-19 school year. Students will have unique learning opportunities in engineering, robotics, computer science, app creator, digital design, programing and coding based coursework provided by Project Lead the Way, a nonprofit organization.

“The Project Lead the Way grant will go a long way to help pay for the course curriculum and teacher training required for the program. Students will eventually graduate with the experience they need to succeed and do something amazing for our community in the future,” Paz added.

On May 25, CMS held a STEAM Fair for the elementary schools in the District to preview the projects that they will encounter when they come in. The fair featured robotics, student-created roller coasters, math activities, fine arts interactive projects, music performances, award-winning poster designs (Visual Arts) and more.

Incoming 6th graders can enroll in a free, STEM Camp held at CMS from June 19-22 from 8:30-11:30 a.m.where they will get a head start on STEM based projects, develop leadership skills, meet CMS faculty, and go on to participate in actual STEM based field experience. The program is open to all current 5th-7th grade students in Canutillo ISD and surrounding area.

Those who are interested in attending for the 2017-18 school year should apply by May 31.

Visit the school’s website at http://cms.canutillo-isd.org/STEAM for more information.

Canutillo ISD Recognized as an Honor Roll School District

Canutillo ISD is one of only 11 in Texas and the only district in the region to make the Educational Results Partnership and Institute for Productivity in Education‘s 2016 Honor Roll, which recognizes high performing schools.

CISD officials, via a news release, stated, “Canutillo ISD is an innovative and forward-thinking school district. The hard work that teachers and students do on a daily basis is being noticed throughout Texas and the nation, too.”

Three schools, Northwest Early College High School, Alderete Middle School and Reyes Elementary School were also honored as Star Honor Roll Schools.

District officials added, “What an accomplishment!  Just another example of how we are on the path to becoming a premier school district…this accomplishment showcases the hard work in Canutillo and also sends the message that El Paso is a center of high quality teaching and learning.”

 

Canutillo ISD Trustee Rodriquez Elected President of Mexican American School Board Members Association

Armando Rodriguez, a member of the Canutillo Independent School District Board of Trustees, has been elected as President of the Mexican American School Board Members Association (MASBA).

Rodriguez recently served as board vice-president and president elect before becoming the first member from the El Paso region to be elected president of MASBA.

MASBA is recognized by the Texas Education Agency and provides continuing education to Texas school board trustees. The organization aims to help school board members come together to find solutions, discuss legislation and current affairs as it relates to education and the Mexican-American culture. Rodriguez says their mission is to advocate for top quality public education for all the children of Texas.

“We are invigorated by issues affecting minorities and I have a heart for our students’ needs,” Rodriguez said. “I decided to take action by getting involved so our students’ voices are heard and addressed.”

In addition to his service on the Mexican American School Board Association, Mr. Rodriguez also serves in leadership positions, including the Texas Association of School Boards, and the former President of the Far West Texas School Board Association. Mr. Rodriguez is serving his fourth term on the Board of Trustees, where he has served as Secretary, Vice President and President.

A graduate of Canutillo High School and the University of Texas at El Paso, Mr. Rodriguez is a business development specialist with Venegas Engineering Management and Construction.

Socorro ISD beats Canutillo ISD 32 to 24; ‘Warm the Soul’ Overall Winner

Team SISD and Canutillo ISD leaders, board members, and employees faced-off for a friendly flag football match as part of the Socorro Independent School District’s annual Warm the Soul collection drive to benefit needy students.

The game ended with a victory for SISD who defeated Canutillo with a score of 32-24.

Since its inception in 2014, SISD’s Warm the Soul initiative has collected more than 600 pairs of new shoes for underprivileged children. This year, the district also collected blankets, scarves, socks, mittens and beanies.

SISD _ Canutillo ISD Warm the Soul3“Warm the Soul is a fun and unique event where Team SISD and Canutillo ISD join efforts to help students in need,” said SISD Superintendent of School Dr. José Espinoza. “Buying a new pair of shoes can be difficult for some families and we want to help with that need. A new pair of shoes, scarf, mittens or beanies will keep our students warm this season, boost their confidence, and allow them to focus on the education they deserve.”

The charity game, which kicked-off at 5 p.m. Nov. 16 in the Student Activities Complex, welcomed an array of players, including the two superintendents, board members, principals, coaches and other district staff who demonstrated their best athletic abilities and united for a good cause.

“This is my third year participating in Warm the Soul,” said Norma Myers, principal at O’Shea Keleher Elementary School. “Bridging two districts together to help students in need is great! We do it on a daily basis, but to do it this way is a lot of fun.”

After the game, Dr. Espinoza thanked Canutillo ISD and Team SISD staff for their donations and support. SISD Board President Gary Gandara, CISD Board president Stephanie Frietze, and trustee Armando Rodriguez, also thanked both teams for their participation.

“We appreciate Canutillo ISD for getting involved and bringing shoes to benefit our students,” President Gandara said. “This will definitely bring a smile to our students faces.”

SISD _ Canutillo ISD Warm the Soul1

Socorro, Canutillo ISDs to Face Off in Charity Flag Football Game

Team SISD and Canutillo ISD leaders, board members, and employees will face off for a friendly flag football match as part of the Socorro Independent School District’s annual Warm the Soul collection drive to benefit students.

SISD’s Warm the Soul event serves to collect shoes for underprivileged children. This year, the district also is collecting blankets, scarves, socks, mittens and beanies.

All participants in the game are donating new shoes, blankets and winter accessories to benefit SISD children. The public is invited to cheer on the teams during the flag football game, and admission is free with a donation of shoes, or three winter accessories.

The Warm the Soul project has collected more than 150 pairs of shoes in past years.

What:         Warm the Soul shoe drive and charity football game

Who:          SISD and Canutillo ISD leaders, SISD students

Where:       SISD Student Activities Complex |  1300 Joe Battle Blvd.

When:        Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016  5 p.m.

Free Pre-K Still Available at 5 El Paso ISD Campuses

Spots for free pre-kindergarten classes are still available at five El Paso Independent School District campuses for any 4-year-old child who lives in El Paso County, regardless of their income or language capacity.

Availability for the half-day pre-kinder program exists at Barron, Crockett, Fannin, MacArthur and Schuster elementary schools. The programs have morning and afternoon sessions.

Registration for the EPISD free pre-kinder program will be from May 16-20. Parents who are interested in participating should call the school to schedule a visit and reserve a spot.

The program is open free of charge to any child living within the El Paso County boundary.

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