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Home | Tag Archives: epcc

Tag Archives: epcc

EPCC Tejanos enter 2020 Season with new coaching staff, new field

With a new field and a new head coach, the El Paso Community College (EPCC) Tejanos enter 2020 with renewed optimism, ahead of the first game of their 25th season.

“El Paso has a very rich tradition of baseball and I plan to continue that tradition at EPCC. My vision is to bring a tremendous amount of success not only on the field, but off the field as well,” head coach Julien Soucy said.  “We will be the best students, active members in the community, and compete at a national level on the field.”

In the off-season, EPCC hired veteran coach Soucy to head the men’s baseball program.

Soucy served as the Pitching Coach/Recruiting Coordinator at Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida for the past three years. During his time there, they had a record of 160 wins and 28 losses.

Julien Soucy | Photo courtesy EPCC
Julien Soucy

In his second year, they went on to win the NAIA World Series and finished ranked #1 in the country. In addition to Soucy, the Tejanos hired Assistant Coach Omar Quintanilla.

Quintanilla began his playing career with the Socorro Bulldogs and then went onto a successful 10-year major and minor league baseball career.

This year’s season begins on the road against Eastern Arizona College on January 24. The Tejanos’ first home stand will be versus Scottsdale Community College January 31 and February 1.

The team plays their home games at the EPCC Valle Verde campus, located at 919 Hunter.

The Tejanos are members of the Western Junior College Athletic Conference (WJCAC) of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA).

EPCC, YISD open Career Center at Riverside Pathways in Technology Early College High School

Tuesday morning, officials with El Paso Community College (EPCC) in partnership with the Ysleta Independent School District (YISD) held a grand opening for their new automotive-centered tech center.

EPCC President, Dr. William Serrata welcomed YISD Superintendent Dr. Xavier de la Torre and students from YISD High Schools to the Career Center at Riverside Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) at the Valle Verde Transportation Training Center.

Officials share that the Career Center at Riverside P-TECH is a collaboration focused on career and technical education. 

“The P-TECH experience that has been established by the Ysleta Independent School District and EPCC is designed to have strong academic and career-orientated results which will benefit both students and our workforce.” Dr. William Serrata said.

According to school officials, P-TECH offers studies in the areas of Automotive Technology, Diesel Technology and Computer-Aided Design.

“Students can couple their high school experience with their experience at a community college and make a solid living wage, contribute to our economy and contribute to their own quality of life,” Dr. Xavier De La Torre said.

P-TECH provides an opportunity for high school students to earn a high school diploma and an associate of applied science degree, a post-secondary certificate or industry certification and work-based training through internships.

As a result of the P-TECH experience, students will become skilled employees that will excel in today’s global economy.

L-R Dr. Armando Aguirre, Dr. William Serrata, Dr. Xavier de la Torre, Mr. Carlos Bustillos

Horizon Heights, Burger King donate food baskets to EPCC Tejano Food Pantry

The El Paso Community College (EPCC) Tejano Food Pantry received a generous donation of food baskets from Horizon Heights Elementary School and Burger King.

During a Monday news conference EPCC officials said the donation will help students during the holiday who have food inadequacies.

“Burger King is proud to partner with Horizon Heights Elementary to see that EPCC students and their families in need receive a substantial meal this holiday season,” Bonnie Soria Najera, EPCC Board of Trustee member and Burger King Marketer said.

The Tejano Food Pantry, a service created by a student for the students, is operated by the Student Government Association at EPCC.

Officials add that the Tejano Food Pantry aims to minimize hunger among our students by providing free, accessible and nutritious food.

Bonnie Soria Najera, EPCC Board and Burger King Marketing Addresses Donation Event_hires

EPCC adopts Tornillo Elementary to promote a College-Going Culture

El Paso Community College (EPCC) adopted Tornillo Elementary as part of its school adoption program during a proclamation ceremony held at the school on Thursday.

EPCC President Dr. William Serrata welcomed Tornillo Independent School District (TISD) Superintendent Rosy Vega-Barrio, Tornillo Elementary Principal, Myrna Lopez and the student body to the program.

“A student is never too young to learn the importance of going to college,” Dr. William Serrata, EPCC President said. “Reaching out to elementary school students and their parents allows students to learn that higher education is within their reach and we build a college-going culture.”

Tornillo Elementary School is EPCC’s ninth school adopted and first for TISD.

“We are beyond excited that Tornillo Elementary has been adopted by El Paso Community College.  This partnership will help us continue our district’s mission to educate our community that students are never too young to learn about the many doors that open when you go to college,” said Myrna Lopez, Tornillo Elmentary Principal.

“Through this collaboration, not just our students, but our entire community will also see that higher education is within reach.”

Officials with EPCC say they have plans to continue adopting elementary schools across its district.

“EPCC is committed to increasing the number of students going to college in the region, by building strong elementary school and college connections through campus tours, workshops, presentations, outreach programs and parental involvement, EPCC is building a college-going culture,” college officials shared via a news release.

Previously EPCC adopted Campestre Elementary from Socorro Independent School District, Frederick Douglass Elementary from El Paso Independent School District, Ramona Elementary from Ysleta Independent School District, Canutillo Elementary School from Canutillo Independent School District, Frank Macias Elementary School for the Clint Independent School District, O’Donnell Intermediate School from Fabens Independent School District, Lorenzo G. Alarcon Elementary School from San Elizario Independent School District and Benito Martinez Elementary from Fort Hancock Independent School District.

EPCC Administrator selected to attend U.S. Department of State Seminar

Santa Fe, New Mexico – Keri Moe, Associate Vice President of External Relations, Communication and Development at El Paso Community College (EPCC), was competitively selected to participate in an Alumni Thematic International Exchange Seminar (Alumni TIES).

Moe was formerly a Fulbright-Hays Scholar in Morocco and is the only community college educator selected to participate in the “Art, Culture, and Transforming Conflict” seminar being held in Santa Fe.

The seminar will convene approximately 40 alumni of U.S. government-sponsored exchange programs who will bring unique skills and expertise in leveraging the arts for social change, community reconciliation and conflict transformation to bridge differences and build peaceful communities.

Alumni will join subject-matter experts and U.S. government officials to discuss current challenges, share best practices, engage in dialogue to learn from one another, and develop solutions for peacebuilding, social change, community reconciliation, and conflict transformation through the arts.

The program is being implemented by World Learning on behalf of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

EPCC adopts Benito Martinez Elementary to promote a college-going culture

El Paso Community College (EPCC) adopted Benito Martinez Elementary as part of its school adoption program during a proclamation ceremony held at the school on December 6.

EPCC President Dr. William Serrata welcomed Fort Hancock Independent School District (FHISD) Superintendent Jose G. Franco, Benito Martinez Principal, Yadira Muñoz and the student body to the program.

“A student is never too young to learn the importance of going to college,” Dr. William Serrata, EPCC President said. “Reaching out to elementary school students and their parents allows students to learn that higher education is within their reach and we build a college-going culture.”

Benito Martinez Elementary is EPCC’s eighth school adopted and first for FHISD.

“Benito Martinez Elementary will engage in meaningful partnership with El Paso Community College to provide a significant way to involve our students, staff and community in creating career and college awareness.”  Yadira Munoz, Benito Martinez Elementary Principal, said.

Previously EPCC adopted Campestre Elementary from Socorro Independent School District, Frederick Douglass Elementary from El Paso Independent School District, Ramona Elementary from Ysleta Independent School District, Canutillo Elementary School from Canutillo Independent School District, Frank Macias Elementary School for the Clint Independent School District, O’Donnell Intermediate School from Fabens Independent School District and Lorenzo G. Alarcon Elementary School from San Elizario Independent School District.

EPCC officials said that they have plans to continue adopting elementary schools across its district.

“EPCC is committed to increasing the number of students going to college in the region,” EPCC officials added via a news release. “By building strong elementary school and college connections through campus tours, workshops, presentations, outreach programs and parental involvement, EPCC is building a college-going culture.”

EPCC currently serves more than 28,500 students and offers 145 degree and certificate programs.

EPCC opens Transportation Training Center

Wednesday, El Paso Community College (EPCC) officials and invited guests held a celebration to mark the opening of the Transportation Training Center (TTC) at the Valle Verde campus. 

“Attending and graduating college is becoming more and more important, because by 2020, 65 percent of all jobs will require a degree or certificate,” Dr. William Serrata, EPCC President, said.

“The Valle Verde Transportation Center will provide many innovative opportunities that will help us reach our goal of educating more students, placing them on a path to completing their degrees and increasing educational attainment in our region.”

The TTC will train El Paso’s future workforce in the areas of Diesel Technology, Automotive Technology and Auto Collision and Repair.

“Studies have shown that these careers have a high demand, now and in the future,” college officials shared. “EPCC is committed to transforming students’ futures by providing high quality and affordable education opportunities for our region. These programs will enhance student life and experience while providing new and innovative learning opportunities.”

Students say they choose to study at EPCC for the state-of-the-art facilities, experienced faculty and for the high-quality training they receive.

One student, Chloe Bauer, who is also an active duty soldier, is working towards her Associate of Applied Science in Diesel Technology and says this program will prepare her to embark on a successful career path.

“I chose the EPCC Diesel Program because it offers an excellent value over the private colleges with similar degree offerings in El Paso. The EPCC facility is wonderful,” Bauer said.  Students have everything we need to prepare us for the workforce.”

Students, using the state-of-the-art equipment and instruction from EPCC accredited faculty, will be highly skilled and lend to bettering the quality of life in our region.

This is the second of six construction projects to finish as part of the College’s Master Plan. Learn more about Districtwide expansion by visiting this website.

 

EPCC, El Paso Sports Commission, hosts the NJCAA National Half Marathon Championships

The El Paso Community College (EPCC), as part of its 50th anniversary celebration, will host the National Junior College Athletic Association Half Marathon Championships.

Over 120 of the nation’s best long-distance runners will complete the 13.1 mile course that crosses Ascarate Park and the Playa Drain Trail.

The race will include athletes from 16 colleges nationwide.

Felix Hinojosa, Director of Athletics and head cross country coach at El Paso will serve as tournament host. Hinojosa was pleased to receive the bid for two upcoming championships, when they were announced in Spring of 2018.

“El Paso Community College is honored to be selected to host the 2019 and 2021 NJCAA Half Marathon National Championships. We look forward to welcoming student-athletes to our great city to give them the best hospitality and race experience possible.”

El Paso will host the 2019 and 2021 championships while Kansas City, KS will host in 2020.

The race is sponsored by The El Paso Sports Commission and the County of El Paso.

What:                  19th Annual NJCAA Half Marathon Championships

When:                 Saturday, November 23, 2019 – 9:00 a.m.

Where:                Ascarate Park Pavilion – 6900 Delta Drive

UTEP, EPCC Program Plans Whale of a Read-a-thon

An ambitious effort to bring people together to enjoy what many experts consider one of the greatest American novels ever written was the reason organizers scheduled the “Moby-Dick Read-a-thon” November 14-16 in El Paso.

Brian Yothers, Ph.D., professor of English at The University of Texas at El Paso, said the public could hear a collection of readers from UTEP, El Paso Community College and the region recite the entire 136 chapters to include the epilogue of the book written by Herman Mellville, who was born 200 years ago in 1819.

The ambitious read-a-thon that covers the exploits of Captain Ahab, Ishmael and other Pequod crewmembers on their intense, international voyage to find the white sperm whale will run from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, in the Discovery Theater of UTEP’s Centennial Museum. It restarts at 8:30 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15, in EPCC’s Little Temple, 906 N. El Paso St., and runs through 6 p.m. The event will conclude from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, in the UTEP museum’s Discovery Theater.

Yothers said this type of event is common in sea faring communities such as New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and California, but added that this might be the first time El Pasoans have tried it. Organizers conceived the idea in spring 2019 and began to plan it this past summer.

“We hope it builds a sense of community around the written word,” said Yothers, a Melville expert and principal investigator of the Humanities Collaborative at EPCC-UTEP, an event sponsor.

Individuals who would like to read a chapter during the event should contact Vincent Martinez, the collaborative’s program manager, at vcmartinez@utep.edu. Participants also could request the chapter they want to read. Chapters range in length from one page to several dozen. This means that participants could read anywhere from a few minutes to approximately 45 minutes. Most of the chapters are in the five- to 10-minute range.

One of the first volunteer readers was Vanessa Zuniga, a junior English major, who signed up to read three chapters – one on each day. The El Paso native is a Humanities Collaborative student fellow, for which she helps organize events that promote literacy. She said this was important because several studies have ranked El Paso low when it comes to literacy.

One examples was a July 2019 article, “Most & Least Educated Cities in America,” on the WalletHub website. It ranked El Paso, Texas, 136 out of 150 metropolitan centers. The researcher used 11 metrics to include adults age 25 with at least a four-year college degree, the quality of the public schools, and the gender education gap.

Zuniga, a first-generation college student, said that she had never read “Moby-Dick” and thought this would be a great way to experience it.  She said that Yothers assigned her three medium-sized chapters. She admitted that she had not reviewed them yet, but promised to recite them aloud in front of her mother before her scheduled readings. She said another reason she volunteered was to practice her public speaking and to network with others interested in the humanities, literacy and “Moby-Dick.”

“I think the read-a-thon was a great idea,” Zuniga said. “I’m for anything that will help the community.”

Louie Saenz, KTEP-FM (88.5) news director and UTEP communication lecturer, said he plans to participate. Saenz, who hosts “The Book Club on Perspectives” show at 12:30 p.m. Sundays, said this kind of event could rejuvenate people’s interest in reading.

“This is special,” said Saenz of the event as he pulled his personal 1920s-era, green-covered hard copy of “Moby-Dick” from his office bookshelf. A British publishing house released the original book in October 1851. An American publisher, Harper & Brothers, printed it the next month. Saenz recalled it being required reading in high school and admitted that he was not interested in it at the time. “This is a literary giant that gave us a sense of adventure. We could dive into the novel, if not the ocean.”

EPCC’s Jorge Gomez, assistant professor of English and a Humanities Collaborative faculty fellow, said he was excited because it would be his first read-a-thon, and because “Moby-Dick” is one of his favorite novels.

“(‘Moby-Dick’) is full of insight about human nature, and from a certain perspective, the American Dream,” said Gomez, who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from UTEP in 2009 and 2011, respectively.

Gomez picked chapter 32, “Cetology,” because of his love of science, specifically in this case, the complexity of whales. He has promoted this event and said he hoped that students would attend and volunteer to read parts of the novel.

Yothers said the read-a-thon would give the community the opportunity to re-encounter this classic and might encourage people to revisit other classic texts. He was philosophical when asked how he would judge the read-a-thon’s success. He said the achievement is the effort.

“The attempt itself has inherent value,” Yothers said. “Our success is to attempt things that captivate and challenge others … like Moby Dick.”

UTEP’s Centennial Museum and Chihuahuan Desert Gardens is the other event sponsor.

Author:  Daniel Perez – UTEP Communications

Walmart donates to EPCC Students with Food Insecurity

 The El Paso Community College (EPCC) Student Government Association (SGA) received a $500 check from Walmart check to support the Tejano Food Pantry.

EPCC officials say this donation will be used to purchase food items to help students in need during Thanksgiving season.

“Food insecurity is an issue that almost half of our student body at EPCC has dealt with. This helps a lot for our student body in conjunction with our Tejano Food Pantry.” Alex Rodriguez, SGA President said. “This donation also gives us the opportunity to hand out turkeys on top of our standard basket of goods that the pantry provides!”

The check from Walmart was presented by Representative Art Fierro, former Chairman of the EPCC Board of Trustees.

“This is the time of the year that partners like Walmart and our office get involved and they are able to give back to the community and to be partners with EPCC,” Representative Art Fierro said. “I wish we can contribute more because the need is here; this group of students gives back to the community, so this check is just the tip of the iceberg to help.”

The Tejano Food Pantry, a service created by a student for the students, is operated by the Student Government Association at EPCC.

The Tejano Food Pantry aims to minimize hunger among our students by providing free, accessible and nutritious food.

The pantry is located at the Valle Verde Campus, 919 Hunter Dr., room C102. For more information, call (915) 831- 2077.

EPCC’s Kemboi Places 2nd, Men Finish 2nd, Women 3rd at NJCAA Cross Country Nationals

El Paso Community College’s Everlyn Kemboi, 2018 National Champion, finished 2nd in the 2019 National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) Division 1 Cross Country National Championships.

The men’s team finished in 2nd place and the women finished in 3rd place.

Two Tejanas earned All-American honors, Everlyn Kemboi (2) and Francisca Jebor (9). The Tejanos were led by Dennis Kiptoo (5) and Bradley Makuvire (8) both earning All-American honors.

 The season culminates with the NJCAA National Half Marathon Championships on November 23 at Ascarate Park in El Paso. Both the men’s and women’s are defending national champions.

EPCC Veterans Resource Center renamed in honor of Kharisma James

The El Paso Community College (EPCC) Veterans Resource Center (VRC) held a ceremony for the renaming of its office at the Valle Verde Campus located in the Student Services Building.

The center was renamed in honor of the late Kharisma James, an EPCC graduate and decorated two-time combat veteran who tragically lost her life walking her children to school in 2018.

“Kharisma was a phenomenal woman who not only served her country but also demonstrated her heroic actions in protecting three children from a deadly crash in the parking lot of a Westside elementary school, which took her life,” Arvis Jones, Director of EPCC Student Leadership and Campus Life.

“Ms. James was instrumental in the opening of the VRC at VV and we want to honor her heroic actions and keep her memory alive.”

A native of the Boston area, James joined the United States Army as a Private First Class after high school.

Kharisma served 8 years in the U.S. Army, including an assignment at Ft. Bliss with the 11th ADA Brigade and completed a tour in Iraq, she was proud to serve her country. She started attending El Paso Community College in pursuit of a Biology degree with plans to transfer to a university BSN Program. She served on the Student Government Association at EPCC and was involved in the creation of the EPCC Veterans Resource Center.

Kharisma graduated from Texas Tech with a degree in Nursing and worked in the operating room at Hospitals of Providence Memorial Campus.

Aspen Institute names EPCC as Top 150 U.S. Community College; Eligible for 2021 Aspen Prize

Officials with the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program Tuesday named El Paso Community College (EPCC) as one of 150 community colleges eligible to compete for the $1 million Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America’s community colleges. 

“EPCC is honored to be selected as one of the Top 150 Colleges eligible to apply for the 2021 Aspen Prize,” Dr. William Serrata, EPCC President said.  “This is a result of El Paso Community College’s long-standing commitment to student success.  From the Board of Trustees, to our faculty, staff and administrators – there is a passion and commitment to ensuring students not only enroll, but also stay in school and graduate so they can achieve their dreams of transferring to a university or entering the workforce in the career of their choice.”

Based on strong and improving in student outcomes—including in learning, completion rates, employment rates and earnings, and equity—15 percent of community colleges nationwide have been invited to apply for the Aspen Prize.

The 150 community colleges named today as eligible to compete for the 2021 Aspen Prize were selected from a pool of nearly 1,000 public two-year colleges nationwide using publicly available data on student outcomes.

Located in 39 states in urban, rural, and suburban areas, serving as few as 500 students and as many as 75,000 students, these colleges represent the diversity and depth of the community college sector.

Data show that over the last two years, student retention, graduation rates, and degree completion have improved at the top tier of 150 Aspen Prize-eligible colleges.

“Community colleges play a vital role in developing talent and enabling social mobility across the country, and it’s critical for them to get better at what they do,” said Josh Wyner, executive director of the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program. “We’re pleased to see evidence that these institutions are improving, that more are delivering on their promise. We’re also pleased to play a role in honoring outstanding community colleges and sharing what works to ensure great outcomes for students—through graduation and beyond.”

The top ten finalists for the 2021 Aspen Prize will be named in May 2020. The Aspen Institute will then conduct site visits to each of the finalists and collect additional quantitative data, including employment and earnings data.

A distinguished jury will make award decisions in spring 2021.

Previous winners of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence are: Miami Dade College (FL) and Indian River State College (FL), 2019; Lake Area Technical College (SD), 2017; Santa Fe College (FL), 2015; Santa Barbara City College (CA) and Walla Walla Community College (WA), 2013; Valencia College (FL), 2011.

For a full list of the top 150 eligible institutions and to read more on the selection process, visit the Aspen Institue Website

EPCC Theater opens new season with My Sister In This House

El Paso Community College (EPCC) Theater Ensemble will begin its 2019-20 season with My Sister In This House directed by Ted Karber Jr. 

Performances will be held November 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 8:00 p.m. and November 17 and 24 at 2:30 p.m.

This extraordinary drama, produced to acclaim at the Actors Theatre of Louisville and at NYC’s Second Stage, tells the story of a celebrated 1930’s French murder case, in which two maids, who are sisters, were convicted of murdering their employer and her daughter.

“This very cinematically structured work explores the motivations which led the sisters to commit murder,” EPCC Theater officials shared via a news release.

An American Sign Language Interpreter will be provided for the November 23 performance. For theater information, call (915) 831-5056.

The EPCC Theater Ensemble performs at the EPCC Transmountain Campus Forum Theater, 9570 Gateway North.

Ticket prices are:

–       General Admission-$15

–       Non-EPCC students and Military-$10

–       EPCC students, staff and senior citizens-$7

Tickets are available at the door, cash only. The box office opens two hours before each performance.

(L-R) Cristy Zermeno as Christine Lutton , Daniela Mendoza as Lea Lutton
(L-R) Dominique Joseph as Isabelle Danzard, Veronica Frescas as Madame Danzard

UTEP, EPCC Presidents pledge to continue collaborating to promote student success

On Thursday, UTEP President Heather Wilson and EPCC President William Serrata renewed their institutions’ commitments to the creation of pathways to higher education for the area’s students.

Both institutions will continue to focus on “building on the successes of existing partnerships with local school districts, and eliminating barriers for transfer students and those who attend both UTEP and EPCC.”

“For nearly three decades, faculty and staff at both El Paso Community College and The University of Texas at El Paso have made a strong commitment to the residents of the Paso del Norte region, developing strategies to provide access to exceptional higher education along with raising the educational aspirations, degree attainment, and overall academic excellence of area students,” officials shared via a news release

EPCC UTEP Presidents Letter
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