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Home | Tag Archives: international space museum

Tag Archives: international space museum

NM Museum of Space History Hosts Moon Over the Museum Saturday

Once a year, everyone on Earth is invited to join together and learn about our planets nearest neighbor, the Moon.

This year, the New Mexico Museum of Space History, in conjunction with NASA’s International Observe the Moon Night, will be hosting Moon Over the Museum on Saturday, October 20.

This free event starts at 6:30 PM inside the New Horizons Theater with the short film “Moon Bloopers,” a compilation of astronaut antics on the Moon.  At 7:00 PM, everyone is invited to join museum educators and local amateur astronomers in the parking lot just above the New Horizons Theater where several telescopes will be set up.

In addition to viewing the Moon, which will be in its gibbous (three quarter full) phase, several planets should be visible including Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Mercury. The event is weather permitting.

Parking for the event will be in the large parking lot just beneath the main museum building. Handicapped parking will be available immediately around the New Horizons building.

Visitors are reminded that white light such as flashlights, cell phones, etc. are prohibited in the viewing area. Red lights or flashlights with clear red covers over the lenses are recommended.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit their website or their Facebook page

NM Museum of Space History To Host ‘Taking the Plunge: The Galileo Mission’ on Friday

Before it took a fiery dive into Jupiter’s atmosphere, the Galileo spacecraft sent back pictures and data that rewrote our understanding of the largest planet in the solar system and its gaggle of moons (including a few that might harbor life).

On Friday, September 7, Museum Education Director Dave Dooling will host the monthly Launch Pad Lecture, as he looks at how we have explored the biggest of the Gas Giants, and shares a peek at what’s next.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available after the lecture on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on October 5, 2018, and the topic will be Live from Outer Space: The Flight of Apollo 7 with Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll.

For more information, call 575-437-2840 (toll free 1-877-333-6589) visit the website  or like their Facebook Page.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs.

NM Museum of Space History’s Free Lecture for June: America’s First Woman in Space

Almost thirty five years ago, on June 18, 1983, Dr. Sally Ride became the first U.S. woman in space. Considered an “achiever” by those who knew her, few people were surprised that she would become America’s first woman to hop a ride aboard a Space Shuttle.

But what about the real Sally? Who was she and why did she inspire so many people?  Why are there so many things dedicated to her honor? There is the Sally Ride EarthKAM, the Sally Ride postage stamp, the Sally Ride Lunar Impact Site, a US Navy research vessel named the Sally Ride and many more memorials to this extremely talented woman.

After her first ride to space, Ride was asked about her experience and she responded, “Ever been to Disneyland? That was definitely an E Ticket!”

On Friday, June 1, join Museum Curator Sue Taylor as she presents the Launch Pad Lecture:  America’s First Woman in Space: Sally and her E-Ticket Ride.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on July 6, 2018, and the topic will be NASA: 60 Years of Launching Our Imagination with Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589, visit the website or ‘Like’ the Facebook Page.

NM Museum of Space History Hosts Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes Tour Saturday

The Tularosa Basin is known for its natural beauty, the white sands of gypsum and the space program. Wait a minute – the space program? To find out more about how the white sands and rockets go together, the public is invited to the Warehouse 1402 program Space and the Tularosa Basin.

On Saturday, March 24th, Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry share stories of the early space program that took place in Alamogordo. The program will start on the first floor of the museum, where special artifacts from the Manhigh program and the high-speed track will be shown.

Then the program moves outside to the Rocket Park where such artifacts as Little Joe II and the case of the missing Apollo Boilerplate will be discussed. Just when you thought you knew it all, you find out there’s more.

The Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes tour will be Saturday, March 24, beginning on the first floor of the museum at 9:00 am. Free coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit their website and ‘like’ their Facebook Page.

The Little Joe II rocket is being installed in the John P. Stapp Air and Spark Park at the Museum of Space History in 1976. Learn more about the history of the Little Joe II and other museum artifacts at the free Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes Tour on Saturday, March 24, at 9:00 am. (Photo credit: NMMSH)

New Mexico Museum of Space History’s “Trinity Site Motocoach Tour” set for April 7

Ticket sales for the April 7th Motorcoach Tour to Trinity Site are soaring and, in response, the New Mexico Museum of Space History has secured a third bus for the event.

“We’ve been pleasantly surprised at the response to this April’s tour and it marks the first time we’ve added a third coach,” said Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll. “Our first two coaches filled up within a very short period of time and there are a limited number of seats remaining in the third. I highly encourage anyone wishing to go, to book your seat as soon as soon as possible.” Registration is available on the museum’s website. The deadline for registration is Friday, March 23.

The Museum of Space History hosts a motorcoach tour to the site each April and October as part of a fundraiser for its Foundation.  Each coach will have a local historian on board, giving an in-depth talk on the bomb and its story, along with unique insight into local history. Once on site, guests enjoy a brown bag lunch, visit to the McDonald House and go on a walking tour of Trinity Site.

On the way back, there’s a special onboard showing of Trinity: The Atomic Bomb Movie. Once back in Alamogordo, guests will be treated to a guided tour of the Space Museum to wind up the day.

Trinity Site is open to the public twice each year, on the first Saturday in April and again on the first Saturday in October. White Sands Missile Range hosts the annual events because this national historic site is on the north end of the normally highly restricted range. Special interpretation at the site is provided by Missile Range staff.

All visitors must have government issued photo identification, such as a driver’s license or passport.

Limited advance tickets are on sale now through the museum’s marketing department or online, and include the round trip to Trinity Site, guided tour, brownbag lunch, and guided tour of the museum. The ticket price is $75 per person, or $65 for museum members.

To reserve tickets or for more information, call 575-437-2840 ext. 41132 or visit the website.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs.  For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or Like their facebook page.

NM Museum of Space History Hosts Lecture “We’re Gonna Do What – Bizarre Rescues in Space”

Space exploration is a risky business and over the years NASA has dealt with a variety of scenarios that show just how dangerous it is. Can astronauts be rescued?

What about the combined U.S./Soviet rescue mission concept and how would the Apollo Soyuz Test Project have fit into that? Have you heard of SAFER – the backpack to rescue stranded space walkers?

On Friday, March 2, join Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll as he talks about safety strategies in space and how they worked – or didn’t work – during the free Launch Pad Lecture titled We’re Gonna Do What? Bizarre Rescues in Space.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on April 6, 2018, and the topic will be 2001: The Space Odyssey That Changed the Way We Think with Museum Educator Michael Shinabery.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, visit their website, ‘Like’ their Facebook page or  call 575-437-2840 (Toll free 1-877-333-6589)

NASA Chooses Alamogordo to Host NM’s First K-12 Space Station Downlink

Alamogordo students are getting a once in a lifetime opportunity to talk with astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on February 21.

NASA selected the New Mexico Museum of Space History, in conjunction with the Alamogordo School District and the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, to host a downlink from the ISS. The museum was one of 14 organizations nationwide chosen to participate in the program for Expedition 54 as part of the “Year of Education on Station.”

This event marks the first time that a K-12 school in New Mexico has participated in the in-flight downlink program.

NASA’s in-flight education downlinks give students the opportunity to learn first-hand from space explorers what it is like to live and work in space. NASA’s Johnson Space Center Office of Education facilitates the events. Downlinks are designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM.

“This is a unique opportunity for students in our area and we are very proud that the museum and our local schools are able to lead the way for our state,” said Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll. “Talking with astronauts onboard a spacecraft was once reserved for an astronaut on the ground, the Capsule Communicator or CAPCOM.  Now, through NASA’s ISS Downlink program, our students get to ask questions of the crew and see them living and working in space. ”

The Alamogordo Downlink project involves students from Alamogordo High School, Academy del Sol, Chaparral, Mountain View, and Holloman Middle Schools, and the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

There will be a total of six teams, one from each school. Team members were chosen by each school’s principal and science teachers.

“It is so exciting for APS to be the first K-12 school district in the state to be part of this wonderful endeavor. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for our students to interact with astronauts onboard the International Space Station – something that we hope inspires them for a lifetime,” said APS Superintendent Adrianne Salas. “We want to thank the Education Department at the New Mexico Museum of Space History for bringing this program to us, especially Dave Dooling and the museum staff,” she added.

During a twenty minute window, spokesmen from each team will take turns asking questions of Astronaut Joe Acaba—a former high school science teacher—Scott Tingle, and Mark Vande Hei.  NASA requires that each Downlink proposal include an education and outreach component to give students background for their questions.

In May of 2017 when submitting his plan to NASA, Museum of Space History Education Director Dave Dooling proposed something a little different – a challenge that would have student teams designing and building a small payload based around the effect of zero G on fluids.

His proposal to NASA was accepted in May and he’s been coordinating with the schools ever since.

“We developed design guidelines for a package about the same size as an experiment drawer on a space station experiment rack,” said Dooling. “We provided base plates built from pegboard and a frame of PVC tubing, and told them to be imaginative with things like water bottles, cameras, even seltzer tablets. And we are providing guidance as the students design and test their payloads.”

Local pilot Mike Haymes has donated his time and aircraft to take the experiments aloft, where Dooling will use free fall as a laboratory to carry out the team experiments. The test flights will take place in late January and early February. The students will analyze the results and present their findings as part of the Downlink event.

The Alamogordo Downlink project will be held at Alamogordo High School’s Tiger Pit on Wednesday, February 21 from 9:00 – 11:00 am. More than 1200 students are expected to assemble at the Pit to watch. Seating there will be reserved for students and teachers. Parents and the general public are invited to the Flickinger Center, 1110 North New York Avenue, to watch the Downlink project live on NASA’s website. A space museum educator will be on hand to talk about the project.

The viewing will be free to parents and the public. Seating will be on a first come, first served basis.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or Like the Facebook Page.

Scott D. Tingle was selected by NASA in 2009. Raised in Randolph, Massachusetts, he earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Southeastern Massachusetts University, and a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. Following graduate school, Captain Tingle spent three years with the Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, California, as a member of technical staff in their Propulsion Department; and was commissioned as a naval officer in 1991. He is currently a part of the Expedition 54/55 crew that launched to the International Space Station in December 2017.
Mark T. Vande Hei was selected by NASA in 2009. From Falls Church, Virginia, Vande Hei earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics from Saint John’s University and a Master of Science in Applied Physics from Stanford University. He was commissioned in the U.S. Army through the ROTC program and served as a combat engineer. In 1999, he became an assistant professor of physics at the United States Military Academy in West Point. He is currently a part of the Expedition 53/54 crew that launched to the International Space Station in September 2017.
Joseph M. Acaba was selected by NASA in 2004. The California native has logged a total of 138 days in space during two missions. In 2009, Acaba flew aboard STS-119 on the Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station to deliver the final pair of power-generating solar array wings and a truss element. During this mission, he conducted two spacewalks. In 2012, Acaba flew aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the space station where he worked as Flight Engineer for the Expedition 31/32. During this mission, the first commercial resupply spacecraft, SpaceX Dragon, arrived at the station. Acaba recently served as Director of Operations Russia in Star City supporting crew training in Soyuz and Russian Segment systems. He is currently a part of the Expedition 53/54 crew that launched to the International Space Station in September 2017.

NM Museum of Space History Features Free Lecture on Shuttle Columbia’s Legacy

Fifteen years ago, the world was rocked when disaster befell the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia. After 27 missions, the Columbia disintegrated upon re-entry on February 1, 2003, killing all seven crew members.

The entire Shuttle fleet was grounded for more than two years while teams of experts worked to make sure more safety procedures were in place for future flights. To this day, researchers continue to study the Columbia as they strive to understand the actions and reactions of objects and materials subjected to the rigors of space travel.

On Friday, February 2, join Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll as he talks about what researchers have discovered and how it impacts the future of space exploration during the free Launch Pad Lecture titled Space Shuttle Columbia: Her Mission Continues.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation. The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on March 2, 2018, and the topic will be We’re Gonna Do What? Bizarre Rescues in Space with Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like their facebook page.

NM Museum of Space History to Host ‘Holidays in Space – Rockin’ with Santa’

The New Mexico Museum of Space History says that the holidays aren’t over yet.  As celebrations with family and friends here on Earth are in full swing, it might be nice to think about what our astronauts are doing and how they celebrate.

Who made a Christmas tree out of cans? Who dressed up like an elf? And who actually saw Santa himself flying by? Join Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry on Saturday, December 30, 2017 as they regale you, not with carols, but with stories about the astronaut’s holidays in Holidays in Space: Rockin’ with Santa.

This free Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes Tour will take place on the first floor of the museum at 9:00 AM.

Christmas 1997, aboard the Mir Space Station. Crewmembers Pavel Vinogradov, David Wolf and Anatoly Solovyev pose with Santa in his Orlan space suit. (Photo credit: NASA)

Artifacts from the collection not on display will be shared from the various missions and International Space Station Expeditions that will be discussed.

Although we tend to think of our astronauts as being far away, they are still in our thoughts as we experience space vicariously through them.

What would it be like to spend the holidays in outer space? Does fruitcake taste the same? How about eggnog? Take the journey and find out.

The Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes tour will be Saturday, December 30, on the first floor of the museum at 9:00 am.

Free coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589, visit the website or ‘like’ their Facebook Page.

Free December Launch Pad Lecture: Running Around the World – Exercise in Space

It’s that time of year when people are thinking about all the great holiday food they’ll be enjoying and how they’re going to get rid of those extra calories.

Astronauts have to watch their waistlines too, and exercise regularly to prevent bone and muscle loss along with maintaining their cardiovascular health. But exercising in space is a bit trickier than here on Earth. For instance, free weights don’t have weight in microgravity.

So how do they do it and why is their treadmill named COLBERT? Join Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll as he explains the intricacies of staying fit onboard the International Space Station this Friday, December 1 at 9:00 am, for the museum’s free Launch Pad Lecture titled Running Around the World: Exercise in Space.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on January 5, 2018, and the topic will be Explorer 1 and Earth’s Invisible Shield with Museum Education Director Dave Dooling.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 (toll free 1-877-333-6589), visit the website or ‘Like’ their Facebook Page.

Space Museum Re-accredited by American Alliance of Museums

The New Mexico Museum of Space History is pleased to announce that it has been formally re-accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, continuing a tradition of excellence for more than 24 years.

The Museum was first accredited by the AAM in 1993, and has remained in good standing since.

For nearly 50 years, the mark of distinction in the museum field has been accreditation through the American Alliance of Museums and it continues to be so today.

Accreditation offers a wide range of benefits to museums, but most importantly it speaks to the commitment that the museum staff has to fulfilling the mission of the museum and to meeting and exceeding best practice standards for museums nationwide.

New Mexico Museum of Space History Executive Director Christopher Orwoll proudly displays the re-accreditation certificate from the American Alliance of Museums. (Photo courtesy NMMSH)

According to the International Council of Museums, there are approximately 55,000 museums in the world. Of those, only 1,067 are accredited by AAM.  The Museum of Space History is also a Smithsonian Affiliate, which puts it in the elite 8% of AAM accredited institutions that carry both prestigious honors – only 87 institutions worldwide.

Of all the Smithsonian Affiliates, however, 40% are accredited by AAM.

“We are very pleased that the AAM has re-accredited our museum. It is a testament to the hard work of our staff and supporters, including the Department of Cultural Affairs, Governor’s Commission, Foundation and the City of Alamogordo,” said Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll. “The investment that our state is making in the museum continues to pay off, with this re-accreditation and with ever increasing visitors.”

The museum exceeded the 100,000 visitor mark this year, for the first time in a decade.

Once a museum is accredited, the process of re-accreditation happens again every ten years in order to make sure institutions are maintaining the standards expected. It’s a process that involves every department of the facility with the application usually taking several weeks to complete. It covers everything from square footage to budget to staffing, and much more.

When the self-study is completed, the museum receives feedback from AAM staff, refines the application and then waits for the Accreditation Commission to determine if a site visit is in order. After the site visit, which is normally a group of two peer professionals visiting for one to three days, a report is submitted to the Commission which reviews it and then decides if the re-accreditation is warranted.

The entire process can take as long as eight months, sometimes longer.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like their facebook page.

Mystery of the Christmas Star Opens November 20

For centuries, astronomers have debated over what exactly the Christmas Star or Star of Bethlehem, as described in the Bible, actually was – if it existed at all. Was it a nova? A supernova? Or perhaps a planetary conjunction?

The Mystery of the Christmas Star, opening at the New Horizons Dome Theater and Planetarium on Monday, November 20, delves into this 2000-year-old puzzle. While seeking to discover a scientific explanation for the Star the wise men followed, the film also explores the historical significance of the story.

Featuring spectacular imagery, The Mystery of the Christmas Star investigates possible dates for the birth of Christ and looks at recorded sightings of significant astronomical events during those times. Which signs in the sky could have been remarkable enough to cause the wise men to travel across the desert from Babylon to Bethlehem?

This modern retelling of the Christmas story will charm and captivate audiences of all ages.

The Mystery of the Christmas Star will show at 3:30 pm daily, November 20 through January 1, at the New Horizons Dome Theater and Planetarium on the campus of the New Mexico Museum of Space History. Other films currently showing are Back to the Moon for Good, National Parks Adventure and Aircraft Carrier.

In addition, live planetarium star shows are scheduled daily. For current showtimes visit the museum website or call the number below.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589, visit the website and like their Facebook page.

NM Museum of Space Warehouse 1402 ‘Behind the Scenes Tour’ for September

Just down the hill from the New Mexico Museum of Space History, set back from the road behind Astronaut Memorial Garden, is a wide metal building. It looks like a warehouse but in reality it is so much more.

Inside are several of the original sleds and part of the original track from the Daisy Track facility that was used at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico.

Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry on Saturday, September 30, at 9:00 am will co-host a fascinating talk about The Daisy Track: Be Careful, You’ll Shoot Your Eye Out.

Many people who visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History overlook this inconspicuous building, little realizing the history that is contained within. The Daisy Track was an important part of the tests done for the American Manned Space Program from 1955 to 1965.

Also in the building are original parts of the Delta Clipper Experimental prototype launch vehicle that was tested at White Sands Missile Range in the 1990’s.

Photos and objects related to the Daisy Track and Delta Clipper that are not on display will be shared in this talk.

The Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes tour will be Saturday, September 30, at the Daisy Track Exhibit building on the grounds of the museum at 9:00 am.

Free coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like the facebook page.

Directions+Map: 3198 State Rd 2001  Alamogordo, New Mexico, NM 88310

Captain Eli Beeding (USAF) endures a record 82.6-Gs while riding the Daisy Track, May 16, 1956.  In upper right corner, inscription in Capt. Beeding’s hand is to Ed Dittmer, Astrochimps HAM and Enos’s handler, who also worked on the Daisy Track. (Photo courtesy of the NM Museum of Space History archives.)

NM Museum of Space Presents A Long Way From Home: Trip of the Voyager Spacecraft

Launched just days apart, the Voyager spacecraft are celebrating their respective fortieth anniversaries and are both on track to become the most distant human made objects in space.

Their missions were to explore the giant planets of our solar system then continue on to where no spacecraft has flown before – interstellar space.

For four decades, the Voyager spacecraft have been successfully transmitting data to the Deep Space Network. What have they been telling us and where exactly are they going? Join Museum Curator Sue Taylor as she shares with you the journey and mission of these extraordinary space probes during the free Launch Pad Lecture on Friday, September 1, beginning at 9:00 am on the museum’s first floor.

A small sample of original photographs – including the famous Family Portrait of the solar system – will be shown at the lecture.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on October 6, 2017, and the topic will be Sputnik: The Beep Heard Round the World with Museum Education Director Dave Dooling.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or ‘Like’ their facebook page.

Solar Eclipse Viewing Event Monday at NM Museum of Space History

All across the country people are preparing for the solar eclipse, whether they are in the path of totality or not.

Since Wednesday, August 9, staff  at the Museum of Space History have handed out 1,000 solar eclipse glasses to area residents and schools.

The glasses are no longer available prior to the eclipse, but the museum plans to have a limited number on hand for the eclipse viewing activities on Monday, August 21, beginning at 10:30 am.

“We’re delighted that so many people came up to get their solar eclipse glasses and hope that everyone remembers to view the eclipse safely. We’ll be offering several ways for people to see the eclipse on Monday, including an opportunity for you to build your own pinhole eclipse viewer,” said Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll.

In New Mexico, totality will reach only about 67% but it will still be a significant event. The New Mexico Museum of Space History is planning a solar eclipse party beginning at 10:30 on August 21, with eye safe ways for you and your family to view the eclipse.

The museum is offering several activities for eclipse day, including a live feed from NASA of the total solar eclipse coverage along with webcasts from other sources, a workshop to teach you to create your own eye safe pinhole solar eclipse viewer, and Education Director Dave Dooling will talk about what causes eclipses and how they helped scientists discover the true nature of the Sun.

All of these activities are free to the public and will be held on the first floor of the museum beginning at 10:30.

At 11:30, a few minutes before maximum at 11:47:51 a.m., activities will move to the museum patio for observing through a Sunspotter and an H-alpha solar telescope as well as the pinhole viewers and eclipse glasses.

In addition, the museum will have free eclipse glasses available while supplies last for event participants.

The eclipse glasses were donated by a local Astronomy Group and were provided through a grant by the Sunspot Community and are certified by the Astronomical League. Museum activities will end at 1:30 p.m.

All activities are free and open to the public.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like their Facebook Page.

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