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Monday , November 12 2018
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Tag Archives: migrant families

Sens. Cruz, Cornyn Tour Shelters Housing Immigrant Children Separated From Families

WESLACO — After touring shelters that house some of the thousands of migrant children separated from their parents under President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy, Republican U.S. Sens. Ted Cruz and John Cornyn of Texas reaffirmed their commitment to keeping kids with their parents after they cross the border — so long as future immigration policy better deters people from entering the country illegally.

“Kids are better off with their moms and dads,” Cruz said Friday during a roundtable discussion at a South Texas Border Patrol station, an event that also featured Cornyn. “I hope we see Democrats and Republicans willing to work together to ensure that … but also to ensure … that we’re respecting the rule of law.”

At the same time, Cruz and Manuel Padilla, chief of the Rio Grande Valley sector of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, sought to make the case that housing migrant children in overcrowded shelters without their parents is nothing new and spanned previous presidential administrations. They said the problem really came to a head in 2014, when more than 51,000 children — mostly from Central America — crossed into the U.S. by themselves.

In a wide-ranging discussion that included more than two dozen mayors, county judges, state lawmakers, federal officials and nonprofit leaders — and just two women — Cornyn said he would like to instruct the nation’s immigration courts to prioritize cases where families crossed the border with children. Cruz said the legislation he introduced in Congress last week is the best way forward. That legislation, which he acknowledged may not have enough support to advance, would require the federal government to keep immigrant families together once they cross the border “absent aggravated criminal conduct or threat of harm to the children.”

Cruz filed his legislation just days after seemingly defending the “zero tolerance” policy, telling KERA in Dallas that “when you see reporters, when you see Democrats saying, ‘Don’t separate kids from their parents,’ what they’re really saying is, ‘Don’t arrest illegal aliens.'”

At Friday’s roundtable, no one seemed to have any answers about how families that have already been separated will be reunited.

An official from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said that kids in shelters could be transported back to their parents’ location in just days — depending on where that is. But it’s unclear how good the record-keeping is that links detained parents to separated kids. And Norma Pimentel, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley and a fierce advocate for ending the policy of family separation, said she’d heard reports of Honduran families waiting as long as four months to be reunited.

Asked to reconcile those conflicting time periods, federal officials said it depends. Sometimes a child raises questions about parental abuse. Other times, it can take days or weeks to make sure that “mom is really mom,” said Jose Gonzalez, a field supervisor with the Office of Refugee Resettlement, the federal agency tasked with looking after the kids. For kids who are too young to talk or identify their own parents, the agency sometimes uses DNA testing, which takes 7 to 10 days. “It may take up to four months to get them together,” Gonzalez said. (Asked about that four-month statistic later on by reporters, Cornyn insisted, “that’s not true.”)

When Cruz asked Ryan Patrick, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District and the son of Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, how many of the immigrants his office has prosecuted for illegal entry crossed with children, Patrick replied, “We actually don’t know.”

Both Cruz and Cornyn said they were heartbroken after touring shelters for children in the Rio Grande Valley, one of which was run by Southwest Key Programs, a Texas-based company that houses nearly half the undocumented kids in federal custody. Despite an investigation by The Texas Tribune and Reveal into hundreds of state violations at some of Southwest Key’s facilities, Cornyn said he believes the company is “doing a very good job.” He described watching the company’s employees take care of weeks-old babies, delivering what he saw to be excellent care.

“You can’t believe all the rumors that are flying around,” he said.

Cruz said little about the conditions of the shelters he toured, other than to offer that “no child should have to experience it.”

Otherwise, both he and Cornyn stuck closely to their talking points. They were encouraged and “gratified” by President Trump’s executive order ending the family separation policy; they felt that legislation would be necessary to carry it out in full force; but they also wanted to make sure that changes in federal immigration law would not encourage illegal immigration.

“If you don’t have a zero tolerance program, then you have a tolerance program,” Cornyn told reporters after the roundtable. “Meaning you tolerate illegal immigration.”

Author: NEENA SATIJA – The Texas Tribune

El Paso Community Foundation Creates Fund for Migrant Families Assistance

The El Paso Community Foundation has created a fund to help local organizations that assist migrant families. Donations may be made to the Migrant Families Relief Fund.

Community-based organizations in El Paso are leading the effort to meet the growing needs of migrant families — children and adults — seeking asylum due to the current conditions in their home countries, particularly in Central America. El Paso, Texas is home to countless immigrants, and has been at the forefront in working with authorities to assist these migrant families.

Currently in El Paso, families are being separated upon apprehension. Migrant children are being placed at a temporary shelter in Tornillo, Texas, 40 miles east of El Paso, and are in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

Their parents are prosecuted and detained at Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers in El Paso.

A donation to the Migrant Families Relief Fund will help provide for short, mid- and long-term needs ranging from basic needs to shelter and legal services. The El Paso Community Foundation will accept donations for all of the services listed below, based on their timing and need.

All credit card and administrative fees will be waived — 100% of donations will pass through to provide direct services, with due diligence performed on the grants by a Nationally-Accredited Community Foundation.

Donations will be distributed to:

• Diocesan Migrant & Refugee Services— Provides direct legal services to the immigrant children separated from their families.

• Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center— Provides legal services to the asylum-seeking parents being separated from their families.

• Annunciation House— Provides refuge to migrants.

Detained Migrant Solidarity Committee —Helps pay immigration bonds that release migrants from detention, helping them reunite with their families, avoid bail bond lenders, and improve their chances in immigration court.