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Home | Tag Archives: nm museum of space

Tag Archives: nm museum of space

Free December Launch Pad Lecture: Running Around the World – Exercise in Space

It’s that time of year when people are thinking about all the great holiday food they’ll be enjoying and how they’re going to get rid of those extra calories.

Astronauts have to watch their waistlines too, and exercise regularly to prevent bone and muscle loss along with maintaining their cardiovascular health. But exercising in space is a bit trickier than here on Earth. For instance, free weights don’t have weight in microgravity.

So how do they do it and why is their treadmill named COLBERT? Join Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll as he explains the intricacies of staying fit onboard the International Space Station this Friday, December 1 at 9:00 am, for the museum’s free Launch Pad Lecture titled Running Around the World: Exercise in Space.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on January 5, 2018, and the topic will be Explorer 1 and Earth’s Invisible Shield with Museum Education Director Dave Dooling.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 (toll free 1-877-333-6589), visit the website or ‘Like’ their Facebook Page.

NM Museum of Space Warehouse 1402 ‘Behind the Scenes Tour’ for September

Just down the hill from the New Mexico Museum of Space History, set back from the road behind Astronaut Memorial Garden, is a wide metal building. It looks like a warehouse but in reality it is so much more.

Inside are several of the original sleds and part of the original track from the Daisy Track facility that was used at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico.

Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry on Saturday, September 30, at 9:00 am will co-host a fascinating talk about The Daisy Track: Be Careful, You’ll Shoot Your Eye Out.

Many people who visit the New Mexico Museum of Space History overlook this inconspicuous building, little realizing the history that is contained within. The Daisy Track was an important part of the tests done for the American Manned Space Program from 1955 to 1965.

Also in the building are original parts of the Delta Clipper Experimental prototype launch vehicle that was tested at White Sands Missile Range in the 1990’s.

Photos and objects related to the Daisy Track and Delta Clipper that are not on display will be shared in this talk.

The Warehouse 1402 Behind the Scenes tour will be Saturday, September 30, at the Daisy Track Exhibit building on the grounds of the museum at 9:00 am.

Free coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like the facebook page.

Directions+Map: 3198 State Rd 2001  Alamogordo, New Mexico, NM 88310

Captain Eli Beeding (USAF) endures a record 82.6-Gs while riding the Daisy Track, May 16, 1956.  In upper right corner, inscription in Capt. Beeding’s hand is to Ed Dittmer, Astrochimps HAM and Enos’s handler, who also worked on the Daisy Track. (Photo courtesy of the NM Museum of Space History archives.)

NM Museum of Space Presents A Long Way From Home: Trip of the Voyager Spacecraft

Launched just days apart, the Voyager spacecraft are celebrating their respective fortieth anniversaries and are both on track to become the most distant human made objects in space.

Their missions were to explore the giant planets of our solar system then continue on to where no spacecraft has flown before – interstellar space.

For four decades, the Voyager spacecraft have been successfully transmitting data to the Deep Space Network. What have they been telling us and where exactly are they going? Join Museum Curator Sue Taylor as she shares with you the journey and mission of these extraordinary space probes during the free Launch Pad Lecture on Friday, September 1, beginning at 9:00 am on the museum’s first floor.

A small sample of original photographs – including the famous Family Portrait of the solar system – will be shown at the lecture.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on October 6, 2017, and the topic will be Sputnik: The Beep Heard Round the World with Museum Education Director Dave Dooling.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are available on the museum’s YouTube channel.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or ‘Like’ their facebook page.

Solar Eclipse Viewing Event Monday at NM Museum of Space History

All across the country people are preparing for the solar eclipse, whether they are in the path of totality or not.

Since Wednesday, August 9, staff  at the Museum of Space History have handed out 1,000 solar eclipse glasses to area residents and schools.

The glasses are no longer available prior to the eclipse, but the museum plans to have a limited number on hand for the eclipse viewing activities on Monday, August 21, beginning at 10:30 am.

“We’re delighted that so many people came up to get their solar eclipse glasses and hope that everyone remembers to view the eclipse safely. We’ll be offering several ways for people to see the eclipse on Monday, including an opportunity for you to build your own pinhole eclipse viewer,” said Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll.

In New Mexico, totality will reach only about 67% but it will still be a significant event. The New Mexico Museum of Space History is planning a solar eclipse party beginning at 10:30 on August 21, with eye safe ways for you and your family to view the eclipse.

The museum is offering several activities for eclipse day, including a live feed from NASA of the total solar eclipse coverage along with webcasts from other sources, a workshop to teach you to create your own eye safe pinhole solar eclipse viewer, and Education Director Dave Dooling will talk about what causes eclipses and how they helped scientists discover the true nature of the Sun.

All of these activities are free to the public and will be held on the first floor of the museum beginning at 10:30.

At 11:30, a few minutes before maximum at 11:47:51 a.m., activities will move to the museum patio for observing through a Sunspotter and an H-alpha solar telescope as well as the pinhole viewers and eclipse glasses.

In addition, the museum will have free eclipse glasses available while supplies last for event participants.

The eclipse glasses were donated by a local Astronomy Group and were provided through a grant by the Sunspot Community and are certified by the Astronomical League. Museum activities will end at 1:30 p.m.

All activities are free and open to the public.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like their Facebook Page.

NM Museum of Space History Talks Total Solar Eclipse Friday

Alamogordo – Roughly every 18 months or so, a total solar eclipse happens somewhere on the globe. For the first time in 26 years, this incredible event is coming to America – but the path of totality is only about 70 miles wide starting in Oregon and ending in South Carolina.

The rest of the country will experience a partial eclipse, with the percentage depending on where you are. Learn more about this exciting celestial event and how to view it safely during the free Launch Pad Lecture at 9:00 am on Friday, August 4th, at the New Mexico Museum of Space History with well-known amateur astronomer James Tomaka.

Tomaka worked as a NASA contractor Systems Engineer supporting the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Program for over 27 years. Since 2012, Mr. Tomaka has been employed by Trax International as the Optics Staff Engineer supporting the Army’s mission at White Sands Missile Range, NM.

Jim is well-known in the amateur astronomy community and also serves as a volunteer ranger at Oliver Lee Memorial State Park handling the night sky interpretive program. In addition to his regular full-time job, he has been actively volunteering in supporting science–related activities in the local community.

These events bring Mr. Tomaka in contact with between 500 to 1000 elementary, middle and high school students per year. He has leveraged his contacts through his career at NASA, along with the US Army, to bring educational outreach materials to these students and their teachers in south-central New Mexico and encourage a new generation of scientist and engineers.

The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. on the Museum’s first floor on the first Friday of each month. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The next Launch Pad Lecture will be on September 1, 2017 and the topic will be A Long Way From Home: The Trip of Voyager 1 with Museum Curator Sue Taylor.

For updates and more information, visit the museum’s Facebook page.

Address:  3198 State Rd 2001  |   Alamogordo, New Mexico, NM 88310   (575) 437-2840

NM Museum of Space Visitation Hits Ten Year High

For the first time in more than a decade, visitation at the New Mexico Museum of Space History has exceeded 100,000. For Fiscal Year 2017, which started on July 1, 2016 and ended June 30, 2017, the museum counted 102,089 visitors through the doors.

“It’s very exciting for us to have five straight years of increasing visitation and to finally top the hundred thousand mark, for the first time in ten years,” said Museum Executive Director Christopher Orwoll. “We are up 11.2% over last year, and 37.8% over our lowest attendance in FY2012.”

The museum’s highest attendance was over 200,000 guests in FY1990, but began dropping steadily after that until it reached a low of just over 74,000 in FY2012.

“I believe this constant upswing in visitors is due to a number of factors such as the efforts of the Tourism Department to promote our state, but more directly for us the support of the City of Alamogordo, the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and our state legislators who helped provide us with the funding to upgrade our facility and exhibits,” said Orwoll.

Over the past five years, significant work has been done at the museum from installing carpet to replacement of the theater’s thirty year old projection system.

Many infrastructure improvements have taken place including HVAC replacement, landscaping, wireless internet for visitors and security cameras. In addition, new exhibits and interactives have been installed and thousands of artifacts have been added to the museum’s collection.

“There are many more improvements that we’ll be making over the next year,” said Orwoll, “and one of the major upgrades will be replacement of the theater’s aging dome. We’ll also be installing a brand new playground area near our rocket park. All of these improvements, whether visitors can see them like the new playground or not see them like the HVAC upgrades, are aimed at improving our visitor experience and encouraging people to come back and see what else we’ve done.”

The museum is a significant tourism draw for the community, as more than 85% of its visitors come from outside of New Mexico. The majority of visitors come from West Texas and surrounding states. The museum also plays host to thousands of school students each year who visit on field trips and take advantage of the facility’s educational programs.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website or like their Facebook page.

Directions to museum HERE.

Driving Directions
While driving through Alamogordo on Highway 54/70, look for the New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped. Turn towards the mountains on Indian Wells Road and drive to the end of the road. At the T-intersection, turn left on Scenic Drive. The entrance to the New Mexico Museum of Space History is just on your right.

NM Museum of Space’s New Horizons Theater to Feature ‘Aircraft Carrier’ Movie Starting July 1

The New Horizons Dome Theater on the campus of the New Mexico Museum of Space History premiers the new giant screen film Aircraft Carrier beginning Saturday July 1.

The giant screen film features stunning and extensive computer generated visualizations of the technology that makes a carrier the preeminent maritime vessel – the apex warship – in naval history.

The mission to protect and defend the world’s oceans has become far more complex and challenging in recent years, and naval aviation has become increasingly vital to success. One of the greatest engineering feats in the history of naval warfare, the modern Nimitz-class nuclear carrier, is a masterpiece of technology, and the flagship of the U.S. fleet.

Aircraft Carrier is a large-format, immersive film packed with adrenaline-laced visuals and human stories that pay stirring tribute to the crucial role modern aircraft carriers play in maintaining the freedom of the seas, and keeping the sea lanes open for commerce.

F-35B fighters make a vertical landing aboard a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercises. Audiences get an up-close and personal look at this next generation aircraft during the film Aircraft Carrier.

With unprecedented logistical assistance and access by the United States Navy, Aircraft Carrier places audiences aboard a Nimitz-class carrier, during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) maritime exercises.

RIMPAC provides a striking visual context for the size and scale of the maritime drill – with over 22 nations and 55 ships participating – along with 92 fixed wing aircraft and helicopters on the carrier itself, a veritable city at sea (population nearly 5,000 crew).

Aircraft Carrier brings audiences not only aboard the carrier, but also the Navy’s newest submarines and cockpit of the Navy’s next generation aircraft, the F-35. Viewers get a unique perspective on these new stealth fighters, observing their advanced technology systems and experiencing the pilot’s perspective as it catapults off from the carrier into flight.

Aircraft Carrier will show at 11:05 am, 1:10 pm and 4:05 pm. Also showing at the New Horizons Theater is National Parks Adventure, Back to the Moon for Good and a live star show presented by a museum educator.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website.

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