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Home | Tag Archives: texas primary

Tag Archives: texas primary

Bloomberg, Sanders push for El Paso votes ahead of Super Tuesday primary

On a sunny, breezy day, Taylor Sanchez knocks on doors in a neighborhood on El Paso’s west side, campaigning for presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg. Most of those answering the door have seen the flood of campaign ads airing on local television. Her mission now is getting people to the polls.

“El Paso doesn’t vote and we lack a lot of representation,” Sanchez said.

At a rally for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in Downtown El Paso, Victor Gonzalez had the same goal: galvanize people to vote, especially young people like him.

“Unfortunately, young voters, people around my age, don’t go out to vote because they don’t find it interesting,” he said. “I don’t believe in that because every vote matters. Every vote is your voice on an issue.”

In this tight Democratic primary race presidential candidates are going after every vote in El Paso, a Democratic stronghold on the edge of Texas.

The effort to lure voters to the polls includes a nonstop blitz of television ads as well as help from local surrogates like Sanchez and Gonzalez, who urge fellow voters to flex their muscle at the ballot box.

Ahead of the Super Tuesday primary two Democratic presidential candidates, frontrunner Sanders and Bloomberg, are spending big money and making personal appeals in television ads and in person at rallies in El Paso. Bloomberg has far outspent his rivals.

Across Texas, the billionaire accounts for roughly 80 percent of the $26 million spent on TV spots tracked by Advertising Analytics cited in several media reports. The spending spree has especially benefited Spanish-language television with an estimated $4.3 million spent on ads airing statewide.

In El Paso alone, Bloomberg has spent more than $1.9 million, according to records TV stations and cable companies are required to file with the Federal Communication Commission. Sanders comes in second in terms of campaign ads at more than $170,000. Both men earmarked a third of their television ad budgets in El Paso for Spanish language television during February.

Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer spent about $39,000 on El Paso ads in November and December, and Pete Buttigieg spent about $59,000 for the last few days ahead of the March 3 primary.

Other Democratic candidates, focused on Saturday’s South Carolina caucus and other areas participating in the March 3 Super Tuesday primary, have not devoted significant effort in El Paso.

The attention from some Democratic presidential candidates is welcomed by many voters in a city that’s been a focal point of the Trump administration’s border enforcement policies, as well as the August 3 mass shooting that targeted Hispanics and Mexicans.

“We’re getting some attention finally, the attention that we do deserve,” said Uriel Posada, regional news director of a territory that includes Spanish language stations that stretch from San Angelo to Midland to El Paso and beyond to Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Bloomberg has spent more than $370,000 alone at Channel 26, the El Paso Univision affiliate. “If we ever flex our muscle, elections can change,” Posada said.

The station, along with other Univision affiliates, has a campaign that urges people to become citizens, register to vote and cast ballots – without promoting any particular candidates. Increasing turnout means engaging voters, Posada said.

Name recognition is also powerful and Bloomberg is banking on that strategy. Posada has seen the influence firsthand in his own family.

“I was talking to my mom. This is going to be the second election she’s going to vote in. She’s thinking about voting for Bloomberg,” Posada said. He told her, “Wait, hold on. You can vote for whoever you want but you have to learn what the other candidates are thinking and are proposing.”

Both Bloomberg and Sanders held campaign rallies in El Paso. Both candidates also paid their respects to the victims of the Walmart shooting by visiting the site of the massacre.

Bloomberg launched his Latino initiative in El Paso. During his recent campaign stop in El Paso Sanders gave his one local interview to a reporter at Posada’s Spanish-language station.

Victor Gomez, 20, a volunteer with the Bernie Sanders campaign, talked about the Democratic presidential candidate’s record and encouraged people waiting in line to enter the Sanders rally to head to a nearby polling place to vote after the event. (Angela Kocherga/El Paso Matters)

The recent Sanders’ rally in El Paso drew a large, enthusiastic crowd of young Latino supporters, including Nubia Laguarda, who listened to live music blaring on speakers as she waited in line to get into the rally venue.

“I think what is special about Bernie is he does move people to come out and vote,” she said.

But attending a rally is one thing, voting is another and campaign volunteer Gonzalez wasn’t taking any chances. Armed with a clipboard he took advantage of the time people spent waiting in line outside to tout Sanders record and make sure they were registered to vote. He told young voters to join a march after the rally to the nearest early voting polling place, the El Paso county courthouse.

Sanders also urged El Pasoans not to sit on the sidelines this election year. “Your vote is your power,” Sanders boomed. “Not good enough to complain that your earning starvation wages, not good enough to complain you can’t afford housing, not good enough to complain about racism or sexism or xenophobia. Now is the time for action. Now is the time to get involved in the political process.”

After the Saturday afternoon rally, the march to the polling place did not materialize. But several small groups of voters were motivated to head to the county courthouse to vote.

“That’s exactly what I’m doing, yeah,” said Adrian Ordoñez, 27 as he stood outside near the Bernie T-shirt stands chatting with 18-year old Dominque Martinez.

Martinez is excited to be voting for the first time but said he understands why some of his friends don’t participate. He said tells them, “your feelings are valid because if you spend your whole life being told to stay in your place and that you don’t know better. But definitely do it (vote) because it’s the first step to start speaking up for yourself.”

Graphic by El Paso Matters

Engaging young voters is a challenge. Most campaigns reach out to people who have voted in the past and may fail to reach newly registered or first time voters including naturalized citizens. In El Paso, one in five people eligible to cast votes in the 2020 primary registered after the November 2016 presidential election.

“I think one of the biggest links is someone knocking on your door, is someone coming to you, explaining why you should register, the policy issues for which you should be concerned about and connecting with those voters,” said Stephen Nuño, senior policy analyst with Latino Decisions, a national research and political opinion firm.

“Latinos are very young. Places like California, Arizona and Texas, the median Latino voter is less than 25 years old,” said Nuño.

The biggest challenge for voters Super Tuesday may be the crowded field of Democratic candidates. Many of those Bloomberg campaign worker Sanchez talked to while door-knocking were undecided. So were some of those leaving the Sanders rally.

“My name is actually Bernie,” said Bernie Morales, 39. But he was not ready to vote for Sanders yet. “I’ll see what everybody else has to say. He said he was also considering Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg.

His companion Edith Blanco, 40, had narrowed it down to two choices. “My top two candidates are Bernie and Pete.”

Author: Angela Kocherga – El Paso Matters

Democratic presidential candidates begin to crowd Texas for final pre-primary sprint

HOUSTON — The Democratic presidential candidates have begun flooding Texas for the final sprint before the state’s delegate-rich primary Tuesday.

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg kicked off the packed homestretch schedule here Thursday morning, branding Super Tuesday as “our chance to nominate a candidate who will liberate us from the insanity of Donald Trump.” Addressing a crowd at a downtown concert venue, the former New York City mayor continued to pitch himself as uniquely able to take on Trump while dropping several reminders of the outsize attention he has paid to Texas while skipping the first few early voting states.

“It’s getting like this is my home away from home,” he said of Houston, later invoking the city nickname inspired by its NBA team. “We need Clutch City to come through.”

Early voting for the Texas primary ends Friday. It began Feb. 18.

Bloomberg has built the largest campaign in Texas — 19 offices and 160 staffers — and his latest tour here marked his sixth trip to the state since launching his campaign in late November, far more visits than any other candidate over the same period. But most of his rivals have far from ceded the state, which will award 228 delegates Tuesday, the second-largest delegate trove among the 14 states voting that day.

On Thursday evening, Elizabeth Warren was also in Texas, for a town hall event with Julián Castro, her opponent-turned-surrogate and the former U.S. housing secretary and mayor of the city. She will also return to Texas on Saturday evening for a town hall in Houston. The next day, Pete Buttigieg will headline an evening rally in Dallas, while Bloomberg will be back in the state for a nighttime rally in San Antonio. On Monday morning, Buttigieg, the former Indiana mayor, will head to Austin for a fundraiser, Tom Steyer will hold an afternoon town hall in Houston, and Joe Biden will spend the day in Dallas and Houston.

“This is the moment in history that we have been called to. This is the moment to choose hope over fear,” Warren said to a crowd of roughly 1,700 people. Warren called Castro “a man who fights with real persistence. … He is the best possible partner I could ask for in this fight.”

The Massachusetts senator, pitching her wealth tax, also knocked Bloomberg — whom she laced into during the Nevada Democratic presidential primary debate.

“There are some billionaires who’ve taken exception to [her plan], and gone on TV and cried. It was so sad, check it out on YouTube,” she quipped. “Others have run for president.”

The flurry of events comes as recent polls show a tight race in Texas between Biden, the former vice president, and Bernie Sanders, the independent U.S. senator from Vermont who barnstormed Texas last weekend. Looming large for some candidates, including Bloomberg, is the 15% threshold that they must cross statewide and in each of 31 state Senate districts to compete for delegates.

While polls make clear only a few contenders will hit the threshold statewide, the others still have an incentive to compete here for district-level delegates. By Thursday, all but a few of the candidates had announced plans for TV advertising in the state — some of them targeting smaller markets such as Odessa and Wichita Falls where they may be able to pick up a few delegates even if they are not viable statewide.

In addition to campaigning in Texas over the next few days, some candidates are sending surrogates throughout the state. Castro is scheduled to make four stops for Warren across South Texas on Saturday, followed by stops the next day in Austin, Dallas and Fort Worth.

“When my campaign was done, it wasn’t a hard decision to support somebody who also believes in an America where everybody counts,” Castro said, introducing Warren in his hometown. He spoke onstage for a few minutes and later indulged in a few selfies with the presidential candidate.

Texas’ significant role in the nominating process this election cycle has given the candidates an opportunity to show off their knowledge of the issues here — as well as some of the culture. After saying Houston felt like his second home, Bloomberg joked that he considered “waiting a couple of more weeks to return, but the combination of rodeo and Lizzo is just pretty tempting.” He also “couldn’t wait that long for another box of Shipley’s,” he said. Warren, meanwhile, kept her remarks about the state brief, only joking that she “[loves] being here, and I love eating here.”

“I may have to cut this short so I can just eat again,” Warren said of San Antonio.

Early on in his remarks, Bloomberg turned more serious as he addressed Trump’s response to the deadly coronavirus outbreak, saying the president was made aware of the threat months ago, “but he buried his head in the sand.” Trump announced Wednesday that Vice President Mike Pence would lead the government’s response to the outbreak.

“These are not things you can jump into, you have to plan and you have to have a staff ready to go,” Bloomberg said, bringing up the public health cuts that Trump has proposed in his budgets. “He’s not leading, he’s reacting — and much, much too late.”

Bloomberg’s pitch found a receptive audience in attendees like June F. Nelson, a 76-year-old Houstonian who said she initially preferred Biden but was turned off by how he handled the Trump-fueled controversy around his son Hunter’s work in Ukraine. She is now fully behind Bloomberg.

“I like the idea that he’s a self-made man,” Nelson said. “I like the idea that he’s not making wild promises. What he says — I can believe that he’ll actually try and get it done. And I think he’s the only person in the campaign that can take on the president.”

Authors: PATRICK SVITEK AND ALEX SAMUELSThe Texas Tribune

Here’s your Texas 2020 March primary ballot

Texas will hold its 2020 primary elections March 3 — it’s one of 14 states to participate in Super Tuesday — and hundreds of candidates across the state have filed to run for public office.

Here’s all of the candidates who have filed for the Democratic and Republican primary elections, according to the Secretary of State.

Each party will choose its candidate for U.S. president, U.S. Senate, congressional and legislative offices, the State Board of Education, the Railroad Commission and judicial seats.

Early voting begins Feb. 18. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote in the primary, the top two vote-getters will compete in a primary runoff May 26.

Texas is an open-primary state, so voters can decide every two years whether they’d rather help pick the Republican or the Democratic nominees (or hold out and go to third-party conventions).

Of note: Whatever primary you decide to vote in, you can only vote in that same party’s runoff, if a runoff is held. You can also vote for either party’s candidate in the general election.

Below, we’ve listed every race in the Democratic and Republican primary elections and highlighted 45 of the most interesting and competitive Races to Watch in the U.S. House and State House.

President

Texas is a big prize for Democratic presidential candidates in 2020. That’s because the state has a huge number of delegates — 228 — and it awards most them proportionally, meaning more than one candidate can secure some of them. At least some of the candidates on the ballot will have likely dropped out by primary election day, however, since Texas follows Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina on the primary calendar.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Bennet
D Joseph R. Biden
D Michael R. Bloomberg
D Cory Booker (dropped out)
D Pete Buttigieg
D Julián Castro (dropped out)
D Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente*
D John K. Delaney
D Tulsi Gabbard
D Amy Klobuchar
D Deval Patrick
D Bernie Sanders
D Tom Steyer
D Elizabeth Warren
D Robby Wells
D Marianne Williamson (dropped out)
D Andrew Yang

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente Guerra*
R Zoltan G. Istvan
R Matthew John Matern
R Bob Ely
R Donald J. Trump Incumbent
R Joe Walsh
R Bill Weld

* There are two people who go by the name of Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente on the Texas presidential ballot. The Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente running in the Democratic primary is the son of the Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente Guerra running in the Republican primary.

U.S. Senate

There’s a big field of Democrats vying to unseat Republican incumbent John Cornyn, but will any of them be able to generate the hype that Beto O’Rourke did in his 2018 race against Ted Cruz? Cornyn is expected to cruise through his primary. A runoff is likely on the Democratic side.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Bell
D Michael Cooper
D Amanda K. Edwards
D Jack Daniel Foster Jr.
D Annie “Mama” Garcia
D Victor Hugo Harris
D Mary “MJ” Hegar
D Sema Hernandez
D D. R. Hunter
D Adrian Ocegueda
D Cristina Tzinztún Ramirez
D Royce West

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Virgil Bierschwale
R John Anthony Castro
R John Cornyn Incumbent
R Dwayne Stovall
R Mark Yancey

U.S. House

There are competitive races up and down the ballot in the U.S. House in 2020. Democrats could mount serious challenges in as many as seven GOP-held districts. Republicans are hoping to retake two seats flipped by Democrats in 2018. But first there are competitive primaries, including in six districts where the Republican incumbent is retiring.
 

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hank Gilbert

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Johnathan Kyle Davidson
R Louie Gohmert Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 2

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elisa Cardnell
D Sima Ladjevardian
D Travis Olsen

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dan Crenshaw Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tanner Do
D Sean McCaffity
D Lulu Seikaly

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Van Taylor Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Russell Foster

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Ratcliffe Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Carolyn Salter

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lance Gooden Incumbent
R Don Hill

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Stephen Daniel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ron Wright Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 7

Six Republicans are vying to challenge Democratic Congresswoman Lizzie Fletcher, who flipped the seat for the Democrats in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lizzie Fletcher Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Maria Espinoza
R Wesley Hunt
R Jim Noteware
R Kyle Preston
R Laique Rehman
R Cindy Siegel

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 8

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Hernandez
D Laura Jones

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kevin Brady Incumbent
R Melissa Esparza-Mathis
R Kirk Osborn

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Al Green Incumbent
D Melissa Wilson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Julián A. Martinez
R Jon Menefee
R Johnny Teague

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 10

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Pritesh Gandhi
D Shannon Hutcheson
D Mike Siegel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael McCaul Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 11

Ten Republicans are vying to replace U.S. Rep. Mike Conaway in this solidly Republican seat.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jon Mark Hogg

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gene Barber
R Brandon Batch
R Jamie Berryhill
R J.D. Faircloth
R Casey Gray
R J. Ross Lacy
R Ned Luscombe
R August Pfluger
R Robert Tucker
R Wesley W. Virdell

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 12

Powerful U.S. Rep. Kay Granger faces a spirited primary challenge from the right in Chris Putnam.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Danny Anderson
D Lisa Welch

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kay Granger Incumbent
R Chris Putnam

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 13

Fifteen Republicans are vying to replace Congressman Mac Thornberry in this solidly red seat.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Timothy W. Gassaway
D Greg Sagan
D Gus Trujillo

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Catherine “I Swear” Carr
R Jamie Culley
R Chris Ekstrom
R Jason Foglesong
R Lee Harvey
R Elaine Hays
R Richard Herman
R Ronny Jackson
R Diane Knowlton
R Matt McArthur
R Mark Neese
R Asusena Reséndiz
R Vance Snider II
R Josh Winegarner
R Monique Worthy

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sanjanetta Barnes
D Adrienne Bell
D Eddie Fisher
D Robert “Puga” Thomas
D Mikal Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Joshua Foxworth
R Randy Weber Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Vicente González Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Monica De La Cruz-Hernandez
R Ryan Krause
R Tim Westley

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 16

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Veronica Escobar Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Anthony Aguero
R Jaime Arriola Jr.
R Patrick Hernandez-Cigarruista
R Irene Armendariz-Jackson
R Blanca Ortiz Trout
R Sam Williams

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 17

Twelve candidates are lining up to replace U.S. Rep. Bill Flores, including Pete Sessions, a former congressman from Dallas.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D William Foster III
D David Anthony Jaramillo
D Richard Kennedy

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ahmad Adnan
R Scott Bland
R George W. Hindman
R Todd Kent
R Laurie Godfrey McReynolds
R Jeff Oppenheim
R Kristen Alamo Rowin
R David Saucedo
R Pete Sessions
R Trent Sutton
R Renee Swann
R Elianor Vessali

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 18

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Allen
D Donovan Boson
D Marc Flores
D Jerry Ford Sr.
D Sheila Jackson Lee Incumbent
D Stevens Orozco
D Bimal Patel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert M. Cadena
R Wendell Champion
R Nellie “Truly” Heiskell
R T.C. Manning
R Nathan J. Milliron
R Ava Reynero Pate

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 19

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tom Watson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jodey C. Arrington Incumbent
R Vance W. Boyd

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joaquin Castro Incumbent
D Rob Hostetler
D Justin Lecea

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary Allen
R Dominick Dina
R Mauro Garza
R Anita Kegley
R Tammy K. Orta

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 21

This race has the potential to be among the most high-profile in the November general election, when it’s expected that freshman U.S. Rep. Chip Roy will face off against former gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis. But first Davis faces a challenger in the Democratic primary.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Wendy R. Davis
D Jennie Lou Leeder

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Chip Roy Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 22

This race is a target for Democrats seeking to flip the seat blue. It will have competitive primaries on both sides. Incumbent Republican U.S Rep. Pete Olson is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Fernandez
D Sri Preston Kulkarni
D Nyanza Davis Moore
D Carmine Petricco III
D Derrick A. Reed

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Pierce Bush
R Jon Camarillo
R Douglas Haggard
R Aaron Hermes
R Greg Hill
R Matt Hinton
R Dan Mathews
R Diana Miller
R Troy Nehls
R Brandon T. Penko
R Shandon Phan
R Bangar Reddy
R Howard Steele
R Kathaleen Wall
R Joe Walz

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 23

This is a perennially swing district. Democrats are optimistic about their chances in 2020 because incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Will Hurd is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rosalinda “Rosey” Ramos Abuabara
D Jaime Escuder
D Gina Ortiz Jones
D Ricardo R. Madrid
D Efrain V. Valdez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Alma Arredondo-Lynch
R Darwin Boedeker
R Alía Ureste
R Tony Gonzales
R Cecil B. “Burt” Jones
R Jeff McFarlin
R Raul Reyes
R Sharon Breckenridge Thomas
R Ben Van Winkle

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 24

Democrats are also targeting this seat. Incumbent U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Biggan
D Richard Fleming
D Crystal Fletcher
D Jan McDowell
D Kim Olson
D Candace Valenzuela
D Sam Vega

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sunny Chaparala
R David Fegan
R Jeron Liverman
R Desi Maes
R Beth Van Duyne

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 25

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Oliver
D Heidi Sloan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keith Neuendorff
R Roger Williams Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 26

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Neil Durrance
D Carol H. Iannuzzi
D Mat Pruneda

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael Armstrong
R Michael C. Burgess Incumbent
R Jason Mrochek
R Jack Wyman

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 27

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ricardo “Rick” De La Fuente
D Charlie Jackson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael Cloud Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 28

Incumbent Congressman Henry Cuellar, one of the more moderate Democrats in the U.S. House, faces a primary challenge from the left.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica Cisneros
D Henry Cuellar Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sandra Whitten

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sylvia Garcia Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Schafranek
R Jaimy Z. Blanco

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hasani Burton
D Barbara Mallory Caraway
D Shenita “Shae” Cleveland
D Eddie Bernice Johnson Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tre Pennie

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 31

After MJ Hegar came close to winning this seat in 2018, six Democrats are hoping to knock off John Carter.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Edward Grimes
D Eric Hanke
D Donna Imam
D Dan Janjigian
D Christine Eady Mann
D Tammy Young

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Carter Incumbent
R Abhiram Garapati
R Christopher Wall
R Mike Williams

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 32

Five Republicans are vying to take on U.S. Rep. Colin Allred, who flipped the seat blue in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Colin Allred Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Genevieve Collins
R Jon Hollis
R Floyd McLendon
R Mark Sackett
R Jeff Tokar

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 33

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sean Paul Segura
D Marc Veasey Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Fabian Cordova Vasquez

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 34

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Osbert Rodriguez Haro III
D Filemon B. Vela Incumbent
D Diego Zavala

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Rey González
R Rod Lingsch

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 35

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rafael Alcoser III
D Lloyd Doggett Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R “Guillermo” William Hayward
R Nick Moutos
R Jenny Garcia Sharon

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 36

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rashad Lewis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brian Babin Incumbent
R RJ Boatman

Railroad Commissioner

In Texas, the Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry, making it a hugely important elected board in the state. Members of the three-person board are elected statewide. One seat is up for election in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Roberto R. “Beto” Alonzo
D Chrysta Castañeda
D Kelly Stone
D Mark Watson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ryan Sitton Incumbent
R James “Jim” Wright

Supreme Court of Texas

Four of the nine seats on the Supreme Court are up for election in 2020. Justices are elected statewide, and Republicans currently hold all the seats. Democrats have fielded multiple candidates for each seat this year.

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Kathy Cheng
D Larry Praeger

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jane Bland Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 7

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandy Voss
D Staci Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Boyd Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 8

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Peter Kelly
D Gisela D. Triana

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brett Busby Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS CHIEF JUSTICE

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Amy Clark Meachum
D Gerald Zimmerer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Nathan Hecht Incumbent

Texas Court Of Criminal Appeals

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals is the state’s highest criminal court. Members are elected statewide and are currently all Republican.

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D William Pieratt Demond
D Elizabeth Davis Frizell
D Dan Wood

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gina Parker
R Bert Richardson Incumbent

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tina Clinton
D Steven Miears

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kevin Patrick Yeary Incumbent

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandon Birmingham

Republican

CANDIDATES
R David Newell Incumbent

State Board Of Education

There are 15 districts within the State Board of Education. Ten are held by Republicans, and five are held by Democrats. Four Republicans are not running for reelection, meaning a shake-up on the board is certain no matter which party prevails in each of the eight seats up for election.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Georgina Pérez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jennifer Ivey

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Larry McKinzie

Note: According to the Secretary of State’s website, the above candidate filed for the democratic primary for this seat. However, the seat is not up for election until 2022. We will update when we receive a clarification from the Texas Democratic Party.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rebecca Bell-Metereau
D Letti Bresnahan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Inga Cotton
R Robert Morrow
R Lani Popp

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Debra Kerner
D Kimberly McLeod
D Michelle Palmer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Hickman

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 8

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Audrey Young

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brenda Davis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keven M. Ellis Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 10

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Marsha Burnett-Webster
D Stephen Wyman

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Maynard Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Greg Alvord

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Maria Y. Berry
R Sue Melton-Malone Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Betancourt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jay Johnson

Texas Senate

There are only a few competitive races in the Texas Senate in 2020, but the ones that are in play are hugely important. In the primary, state Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., the Democrat most likely to cross party lines in the Senate, faces a challenge from the left. In the general election, Democrats will try to unseat Republican Sen. Pete Flores and eliminate the supermajority that allows Republicans to bring a bill to the floor without Democratic support.
 

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Audrey Spanko

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bryan Hughes Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jay Stittleburg

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brandon Creighton Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Carol Alvarado Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 11

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Susan Criss
D Margarita Ruiz Johnson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Larry Taylor Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 12

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Randy Daniels
D Shadi Zitoon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jane Nelson Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 13

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard R. Andrews
D Borris L. Miles Incumbent
D Melissa Morris

Republican

CANDIDATES
R William J. Booher
R Milinda Morris

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 18

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Antalan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lois W. Kolkhorst Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 19

This is a seat that traditionally leans blue, but Republican Pete Flores won it in a special election in 2018. Democrats are competing for the chance to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Roland Gutierrez
D Freddy Ramirez
D Xochil Peña Rodriguez
D Belinda Shvetz

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Peter P. “Pete” Flores Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Judy Cutright

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 21

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Judith Zaffirini Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Frank Pomeroy

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 22

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Robert Vick

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brian Birdwell Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 24

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Clayton Tucker

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dawn Buckingham Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 26

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D José Menéndez Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 27

Eddie Lucio Jr. is perhaps the most conservative Democrat in the Texas Senate. This year he’s facing a primary challenge from the left.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sara Stapleton Barrera
D Ruben Cortez
D Eddie Lucio Jr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Vanessa Tijerina

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 28

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charles Perry Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D César J. Blanco

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bethany Hatch

Texas House

The race for the Texas House might be the marquee political contest in the state in 2020. Democrats have a chance to gain control of the chamber for the first time since 2001. The primary will be relatively tame, however, with fewer intraparty fights among Republicans.
 

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 1

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary VanDeaver Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 2

Bryan Slaton narrowly lost a primary challenge to U.S. Rep. Dan Flynn in 2018. He’s one of two Republicans seeking to knock Flynn off in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Bill Brannon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dwayne “Doc” Collins
R Dan Flynn Incumbent
R Bryan Slaton

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Martin Shupp

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cecil Bell Jr. Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 4

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keith Bell Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D LaWyanda Prince

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cole Hefner Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Gobble

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Schaefer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 7

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jay Dean Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 8

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cody Harris Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 9

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Chris Paddie Incumbent
R Mark Williams

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 10

This seat is open thanks to the impending retirement of state Rep. John Wray. The winner of the Republican primary will be the clear favorite to win the general election in November.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jake Ellzey
R Ryan Pitts
R Robert “Zack” Rader

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 11

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alec Johnson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Travis Clardy Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 12

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kyle Kacal Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 13

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ben Leman Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Janet Dudding
D Raza Rahman

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Raney Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lorena Perez McGill

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Steve Toth Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 16

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Metcalf Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 17

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Madeline Eden

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John P. Cyrier Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 18

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ernest Bailes Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 19

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James White Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica Tiedt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Terry M. Wilson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 21

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dade Phelan Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 22

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Deshotel Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jacorion Randle

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 23

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jeff Antonelli

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Mayes Middleton Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 24

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brian J. Rogers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Greg Bonnen Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 25

This seat is open thanks to the impending retirement of House Speaker Dennis Bonnen. The winner of the Republican primary will be the clear favorite to win the general election in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Patrick Henry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Troy T. Brimage
R Ro’Vin Garrett
R Rhonda Seth
R Mitch Thames
R Cody Thane Vasut

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 26

This seat became open after Republican state Rep. Rick Miller announced his retirement. Democrats are targeting the seat in November because Miller won it by just 5 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lawrence Allen Jr.
D L. “Sarah” DeMerchant
D Suleman Lalani
D Rish Oberoi

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Leonard N. Chan
R Jacey Jetton
R Matt Morgan

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 27

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ron Reynolds Incumbent
D Byron Ross

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Manish Seth
R Tom Virippan

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 28

Democrats see an opportunity to flip this seat after the resignation of state Rep. John Zerwas. They will get their first chance to gain a seat in a Jan. 28 special election.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Markowitz

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary Gates
R Schell Hammel

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Travis Boldt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ed Thompson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Vanessa Hicks-Callaway
R Geanie W. Morrison Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 31

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ryan Guillen Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Marian Knowlton

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 32

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Eric Holguin

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Todd Hunter Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 33

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Andy Rose

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Justin Holland Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 34

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Abel Herrero Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James Hernandez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 35

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Oscar Longoria Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 36

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sergio Muñoz Jr. Incumbent
D Abraham Padron

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 37

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alex Dominguez Incumbent
D Amber Medina

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 38

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Erin Gamez
D Eddie Lucio III Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 39

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Armando “Mando” Martinez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 40

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Terry Canales Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 41

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Gonzales
D Bobby Guerra Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John “Doc” Robert Guerra

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 42

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Peña Raymond Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 43

Republican

CANDIDATES
R J.M. Lozano Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 44

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Robert Bohmfalk

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Kuempel Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 45

State Rep. Erin Zwiener flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Liliana Posada
D Erin Zwiener Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Carrie Isaac
R Austin Talley
R Kent “Bud” Wymore

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 46

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sheryl Cole Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 47

State Rep. Vikki Goodwin flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Vikki Goodwin Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Justin Berry
R Jennifer Fleck
R Jenny Roan Forgey
R Aaron Reitz
R Don Zimmerman

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 48

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Donna Howard Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bill Strieber

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 49

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gina Hinojosa Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jenai Aragona-Hales
R Charles Allan Meyer

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 50

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Celia Israel Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Larry Delarose

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 51

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Eddie Rodriguez Incumbent
D Joshua Sanchez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Reynolds

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 52

State Rep. James Talarico flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Talarico Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lucio Valdez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 53

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe P. Herrera

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Andrew S. Murr Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 54

Democrats expect this seat to be competitive after state Rep. Brad Buckley won reelection by 7 percentage points in 2018, and Democrat Beto O’Rourke narrowly lost it in his race for U.S. Senate.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Likeithia “Keke” Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brad Buckley Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 55

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Hugh D. Shine Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 56

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Katherine Turner-Pearson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charles “Doc” Anderson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 57

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jason Rogers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Trent Ashby Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 58

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Cindy Rocha

Republican

CANDIDATES
R DeWayne Burns Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 59

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cody Johnson
R J.D. Sheffield Incumbent
R Shelby Slawson

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 60

This is an open seat after the retirement of state Rep. Mike Lang. The winner of the Republican primary will be the overwhelming favorite in the November general election.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jon Francis
R Christopher M. Perricone
R Glenn Rogers
R Kellye SoRelle

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 61

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christopher Cox

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Phil King Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 62

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gary D. Thomas

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Reggie Smith Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 63

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Leslie Peeler

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tan Parker Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 64

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Lynn Stucky won reelection by 8 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Angela Brewer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lynn Stucky Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 65

State Rep. Michelle Beckley flipped this seat in 2018, but she faces a primary challenger. Republicans are also eyeing it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michelle Beckley Incumbent
D Paige Dixon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Nancy Cline
R Kronda Thimesch

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 66

This race is a high priority target for Democrats after state Rep. Matt Shaheen won reelection by less than 1 percentage point in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sharon Hirsch
D Aimee Garza Lopez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Shaheen Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 67

This race is a target for Democrats after state Rep. Jeff Leach won reelection by fewer than 3 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tom Adair
D Rocio Gosewehr Hernandez
D Anthony Lo
D Lorenzo Sanchez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Leach Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 68

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Patsy Ledbetter

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Drew Springer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 69

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James B. Frank Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 70

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Angie Bado

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Scott Sanford Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 71

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Samuel Hatton

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Stan Lambert Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 72

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Drew Darby Incumbent
R Lynette Lucas

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 73

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Stephanie Phillips

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kyle Biedermann Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 74

This seat is open after the retirement of state Rep. Poncho Nevárez. The Democrat who wins the primary will be heavily favored in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rowland Garza
D Eddie Morales Jr.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ruben Falcon
R Robert Garza

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 75

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Mary E. González Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 76

This seat is open after state Rep. Cesar Blanco announced he’s running for state Senate. The Democrat who wins in the primary will be heavily favored in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Claudia Ordaz Perez
D Elisa Tamayo

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 77

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Evelina (Lina) Ortega Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 78

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Moody Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeffrey Lane

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 79

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Art Fierro Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 80

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tracy King Incumbent
D Danny Valdez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 81

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brooks Landgraf Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 82

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Craddick Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 83

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Barrick
D Addison Perry-Franks

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dustin Burrows Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 84

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Gibson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Frullo Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 85

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joey Cardenas III

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Abolaji Tijani Ayobami
R Robert Boettcher
R Phil Stephenson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 86

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Smithee Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 87

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Four Price Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 88

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ken King Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 89

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sugar Ray Ash
D Jon Cocks

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Candy Noble Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 90

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ramon Romero Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Elva Camacho

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 91

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jeromey Sims

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Stephanie Klick Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 92

This seat is open after state Rep. Jonathan Stickland announced he wasn’t running for reelection. It is a Democratic target after Stickland won by fewer than 3 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Steven Riddell
D Jeff Whitfield

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Cason
R Taylor Gillig
R Jim Griffin

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 93

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Matt Krause won reelection by 8 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lydia Bean

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Krause Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 94

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Tony Tinderholt won reelection by about 9 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alisa Simmons

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tony Tinderholt Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 95

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Nicole Collier Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 96

This seat is a Democratic target after state Rep. Bill Zedler won reelection by fewer than 4 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Drago

Republican

CANDIDATES
R David Cook

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 97

Democrats are hopeful they can win this seat after U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, only won the district by 2 percentage points at the top of the ballot in 2018. Goldman won reelection by 8 percentage points.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Beck
D Dan Willis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Craig Goldman Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 98

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Debra Edmondson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Giovanni Capriglione Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 99

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charlie Geren Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 100

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Armstrong III
D Lorraine Birabil
D Daniel Davis Clayton
D Sandra Jonelle Crenshaw
D Jasmine Felicia Crockett
D Paul K. Stafford

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 101

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Turner Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 102

Ana-Maria Ramos flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ana-Maria Ramos Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Linda Koop
R Rick Walker

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 103

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rafael M. Anchia Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jerry Fortenberry II
R Sherry Lee Mecom

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 104

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica González Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 105

Thresa “Terry” Meza flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by nearly 10 percentage points. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Terry Meza Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gerson Hernandez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 106

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jennifer Skidonenko

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jared Patterson Incumbent
R James Trombley

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 107

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Victoria Neave Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Samuel Smith

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 108

Flipping this seat is a top priority for Democrats after state Rep. Morgan Meyer won reelection by less than 1 percentage point in 2018. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, lost the district by more than 15 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joanna Cattanach
D Tom Ervin
D Shawn D. Terry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Morgan Meyer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 109

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christopher L. Graham
D Carl O. Sherman Sr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dr. Eugene Allen

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 110

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Toni Rose Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 111

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Yvonne Davis Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 112

This seat is a top Democratic target after state Rep. Angie Chen Button won reelection by 2 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandy K. Chambers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Angie Chen Button Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 113

State Rep. Rhetta Bowers flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by 7 percentage points. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rhetta Andrews Bowers Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Douglas
R Bill Metzger

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 114

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Turner Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Luisa Del Rosal

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 115

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Johnson Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Karyn Brownlee

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 116

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Evan Bohl
D Trey Martinez Fischer Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Litoff
R Fernando Padron

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 117

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Philip Cortez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Carlos Antonio Raymond

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 118

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Leo Pacheco Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Adam Salyer

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 119

This seat is open as incumbent state Rep. Roland Gutierrez runs for state Senate.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth “Liz” Campos
D Jennifer Ramos
D Sean Villasana

Republican

CANDIDATES
R George B. Garza

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 120

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Barbara Gervin-Hawkins Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ronald Payne
R Andrew Fernandez Vicencio

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 121

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Becca Moyer DeFelice
D Jack Guerra
D Celina Montoya

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Steve Allison Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 122

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Claire Barnett

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lyle Larson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 123

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Diego Bernal Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 124

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ina Minjarez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 125

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ray Lopez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 126

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Undrai F. Fizer
D Natali Hurtado

Republican

CANDIDATES
R E. Sam Harless Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 127

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dwight Ford
R Dan Huberty Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 128

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Josh Markle
D Mary E. Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Briscoe Cain Incumbent
R Robert C. Hoskins

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 129

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Kayla Alix

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ryan Lee
R Dennis Paul Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 130

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Bryan J. Henry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Oliverson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 131

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alma A. Allen Incumbent
D Carey Lashley
D Elvonte Patton

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 132

State Rep. Gina Calanni narrowly flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by less than half of one percentage point. Republicans will try to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gina Calanni Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Angelica Garcia
R Mike Schofield

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 133

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sandra G. Moore

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jim Murphy Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 134

Democrat Beto O’Rourke won this district by more than 20 percentage points in 2018, though incumbent Republican state Rep. Sarah Davis held onto her seat by 6 percentage points. Democrats hope to flip it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lanny Bose
D Ann Johnson
D Ruby Powers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sarah Davis Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 135

State rep. John Rosenthal flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jon E. Rosenthal Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Merrilee Rosene Beazley
R Justin Ray

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 136

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John H. Bucy III Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Mike Guevara

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 137

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gene Wu Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 138

This is an open seat after Republican state Rep. Dwayne Bohac decided not to run for reelection. Bohac won in 2018 by 0.1 percentage points, Democrats hope to flip it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Akilah Bacy
D Jenifer Rene Pool
D Josh Wallenstein

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Josh Flynn*
R Lacey Hull
R Claver T. Kamau-Imani

* Josh Flynn was declared ineligible for the primary by the Harris County Republican Party after the December 10 candidate filing deadline. According to the Secretary of State, his name will remain on the ballot, but if he wins the election outright, the precinct chairs will pick the nominee.

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 139

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jarvis D. Johnson Incumbent
D Angeanette Thibodeaux

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 140

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Armando Lucio Walle Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 141

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Willie Roaches Franklyn
D Senfronia Thompson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 142

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Bonton
D Jerry Davis
D Natasha Ruiz
D Harold V. Dutton Jr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jason Rowe

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 143

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ana Hernandez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 144

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Mary Ann Perez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tony Salas

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 145

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christina Morales Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Martha Elena Fierro

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 146

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Shawn Nicole Thierry Incumbent
D Ashton P. Woods

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 147

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Garnet F. Coleman Incumbent
D Colin Ross
D Aurelia Wagner

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 148

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Anna Eastman
D Adrian Garcia
D Cynthia Reyes-Revilla
D Penny Morales Shaw
D Emily Wolf

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Luis LaRotta

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 149

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hubert Vo Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lily Truong

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 150

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Robert Walsh

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Valoree Swanson Incumbent

Author: CARLA ASTUDILLOThe Texas Tribune

Analysis: Notes on a Texas Primary Election

This year’s political upheaval is nearly complete, at least in Texas. Most of what the state’s voters were going to get done in this election cycle got done on Tuesday.

They had their say on presidential nominees. About two-thirds of them kept voting after they were finished with that race, opting to keep all but four of the incumbents who were seeking reelection to state office and setting the table for a general election in which most of the races were predetermined when elected politicians drew the state’s political maps.

Some highlights:

• Turnout was huge. In fact, it was almost exactly the same as in 2008 — the last time the presidential candidates got to Texas before the nominations were locked up. The parties were flipped this time, though.

In 2008, when Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were still battling for the nomination, more than 2.8 million Democrats and about 1.4 million Republicans voted in the primaries. This year, it was 2.8 million Republicans and 1.4 million Democrats. The total both years was just more than 4.2 million.

That’s 22.3 percent of the state’s current voting age population; 30 percent of the state’s registered voters.

• Voter falloff was huge, too. One third of the Republicans and slightly fewer Democrats who voted in the top statewide race — the one for president — didn’t vote in the bottom race for one of three slots on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. That’s about normal for Texas primary elections; lots of voters come for the race they know most about and skip the rest.

How many people walked away? A total of nearly 1.4 million voters, including 897,140 Republicans and 476,665 Democrats.

• Twenty-two primary races — six on the Democratic side and 16 on the Republican — will be settled in May 24 runoffs, since no candidate got 50 percent or more of the vote.

Only three runoffs — all in Texas House contests — involve incumbents. State Reps. Doug Miller, R-New Braunfels, Ron Reynolds, D-Missouri City, and Wayne Smith, R-Baytown, could still lose to someone from their own political party.

Three more runoffs will determine who gets to face an incumbent in the November general election: one each for a seat in Congress, on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and on the State Board of Education.

• Unless Texans are ready to put a Libertarian, a Green or an Independent in office, voters have already decided on 10 congressional races, four of the eight State Board of Education races on this year’s ballots, 12 of the 16 state Senate spots up for election, and 97 of the 150 contests for spots in the Texas House.

You can safely tell your friends and family that the Texas House will have at least 59 Republicans and 38 Democrats when members are sworn in next January, and that at least six Democrats and six Republicans are joining the 15 senators already seated.

The current 36-member Texas congressional delegation has 11 Democrats; eight of the Democrats on the ballot are already assured seats in the next Congress, along with two Republicans.

If the current political districts remain as predictable in the general election as they have proven to be in the last few elections, most of the candidates still on the ballot face opponents who have only slim chances of winning. Only one of the state’s congressional districts — the 23rd, which stretches from El Paso to San Antonio and includes most of the state’s border with Mexico — is considered competitive in a general election. The rest are lopsided in favor of the Democrats (11 districts) or the Republicans (24 districts).

The state Senate maps are similarly tilted. Unless somebody slips on a banana peel, the Texas Senate will have a few new faces but the same party mix: 11 Democrats and 20 Republicans.

There’s a little more play in the Texas House, where the mix during last year’s regular session was 98 Republicans and 52 Democrats. In the 2014 elections, the major-party statewide candidates were separated, on average, by less than 10 percentage points in only nine House districts. In 96 districts, the Republican candidates beat the Democratic candidates by more than that.

Most of the changes in the state’s political roster take place in primaries, and for all but a small number of candidates, the year’s races have effectively ended.

Author:  – The Texas Tribune

The Texas Tribune is a nonpartisan, nonprofit media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them – about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues

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