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Home | Tag Archives: thanksgiving

Tag Archives: thanksgiving

Texas Farm Bureau: Texans to Pay Slightly More for Thanksgiving This Year

WACO – A traditional, Texas-style Thanksgiving dinner for 10 will cost $48.49 this year, up $2.41 from a year ago, according to the special Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) Thanksgiving Meal Report.

“Although the overall Thanksgiving meal cost increased slightly this year, the items needed for a traditional Thanksgiving dinner are still affordable for consumers,” Texas Farm Bureau President Russell Boening said. “Farmers across Texas and the U.S. work to provide abundant and affordable food products throughout the year, not just at Thanksgiving.”

The survey records the cost of 10 holiday staples—including turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and pecan pie.

Turkey prices led the increase, with a 16-pound turkey ringing in at $19.74. The cost of a turkey in Texas stores, however, is still lower than the national average of $21.71 for a 16-pound bird, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation’s food price survey.

Turkey production has slowed this year, which is reflected in the cost at the grocery store.

Dairy products saw a decrease in price due to an ample supply of milk.

Of the 10 items surveyed, shelled and halved pecans, brown and serve rolls, jellied cranberry sauce and frozen green beans showed small increases.

Cubed stuffing and frozen pie shells decreased in price this year. Fresh sweet potatoes had no change from 2017.

TFB’s Thanksgiving Meal Report and Grocery Price Watch prices were reported by 45 volunteer shoppers at grocery stores statewide from November 2-9. TFB has released its informal Grocery Price Watch survey quarterly since March 2009.

TFB Thanksgiving Meal Report Shows Price Decrease

WACO, Texas — Consumers have good news to chew on this Thanksgiving as prices dropped 4.3 percent from last year.

A traditional, Texas-style Thanksgiving dinner for 10 will cost $46.75 this year, according to the special Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) Thanksgiving Meal Report.

The survey records the cost of 10 holiday staples—including turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and pecan pie. The 2017 report shows the average cost of this year’s holiday dinner dropped $2.10 from $48.85 last year.

“Preparing large holiday meals can be expensive,” TFB President Russell Boening said. “But this year, Texans can budget a little less for the traditional Thanksgiving meal.”

Survey shoppers found the price of a 16-pound, frozen, self-basting, young tom turkey to be significantly lower—down $1.76—from previous years.

That’s due in part to a good production year for turkey farmers across the U.S. A recent report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows record amounts of turkey kept in cold storage. The extra supply, Boening noted, has encouraged some retailers to move the product at discounted prices while demand is high.

In addition to the turkey, five other items decreased in price: fresh sweet potatoes (down .98 percent); cubed stuffing, herb seasoning (down 2.72 percent); brown and serve rolls, 12 package (down 1.09 percent); 9-inch pie shells, frozen (down 3.92 percent); whole milk (down 3.70 percent); and pecans, shelled and halved (down 0.95 percent).

Although Hurricane Harvey took a bite out of the Texas pecan crop, prices remain close to what they were last year due to a large supply from above average crops in consecutive years.

“Even though some pecan orchards suffered great damage from Hurricane Harvey, prices for this year, according to our survey, have held steady with last year’s prices,” Boening said.

Texans will pay more for two Thanksgiving staples this year—jellied cranberry sauce (up 3.62 percent) and whipping cream (up 3.49 percent).

TFB’s fourth quarter Grocery Price Watch survey, taken in conjunction with the 2017 Thanksgiving Meal Report, also indicated a slight decrease for household staples. Results from the quarterly survey of 16 common food products decreased 68 cents from $46.75 in the third quarter to $46.07 in the fourth quarter of this year.

TFB’s Thanksgiving Meal Report and Grocery Price Watch prices were reported by 41 volunteer shoppers at grocery stores statewide from Nov. 2-9.

TFB has released its Grocery Price Watch survey quarterly since March 2009.

Video+Story: ‘Hanks’giving Tradition Continues to Grow

Every day, hundreds of students walk the halls of J.M. Hanks High School. As they make their way through the bustling campus, they may be thinking about this week’s football game, their next date, or what University they’ll be applying to.

But around this time every year, they all begin to think about their fellow El Pasoans who will not have a Thanksgiving meal.

I was able to sit down with Hanks Student Advisor Monica Lopez, and Carolina and Maxine, two students working on Hanksgiving.

“Hanksgiving began the year after I got here,” says Monica Lopez, “in 2001.”

When Hanksgiving first started, it was student council bringing in blankets and different donations. “One day,” says Monica, “me and the student council sponsors got together, and Hanksgiving was born.”

That first year, there were only ten baskets distributed to families in need; according to Monica, the students were frustrated.

“They wanted to do more,” says Monica. “so, we went from ten to eighty to over a hundred.” Then, one day, the student president said, “How about we do five-hundred?” And that’s what they’ve been distributing ever since.

Often, they will feed more than five-hundred families.

“We’ve been very fortunate that we’ve always gone over,” says Monica. “People come through at the end; they see me panicking, that we need this or that.” People come in and help meet that need, in what’s lacking, and exceed that goal.

She adds, “It never fails…it’s a worry to me, and the kids say I worry too much.”

In the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, and Hanksgiving, Monica begins to receive phone calls. People are wanting to know if they will receive a Thanksgiving basket. Schools begin calling to send in their lists of those in need- and the students at Hanks and its feeder schools go out and identify those families in need.

Can you imagine what it must be like for a family that cannot meet the basic needs of daily living, much less how they are going to feed their families? Hanksgiving is working to step in and meet that need on Thanksgiving so that people may come together and share a meal knowing that the community cares for them, and wants to help them.

“Hanksgiving has always been near and dear to my heart,” says Monica. “Each year, the officers who come through, know how much of a commitment it is, and that they need to get it done. They don’t want to be the ones who fail.”

“Hanksgiving is important because we help out the community,” says Carolina.

Carolina has been involved for the past four years. Maxine has been involved in elementary school.

“It allows me to see what families need, what they are missing, that I have that I should be grateful for,” says Maxine. “It allows me to open up my eyes to see the community and be able to say that I helped the community.”

“The fact we impact so many lives is really eye opening for us,” Carolina said. “We take advantage of many things in our everyday life that other people don’t have.”

Then there was the time Monica was a local restaurant. “A few years back I was at a restaurant and was wearing a Hanksgiving shirt, and a lady asked me how I know about Hanksgiving. I told her I was the organizer and she thanked me because we helped her out one year.”

Hanksgiving does touch the lives of those who receive food baskets. But those students who work on the project, it touches them as well.

If you would like to help Hanksgiving organizers meet – and exceed their goal this year – you can drop off your donations of turkeys, yams, stuffing, and more at one of the following locations:

November 5th – Walmart at Cielo Vista from 9am to 2pm
November 11th – Walmart on Saul Kleinfeld from 9am to 2pm
November 12th – Walmart at Cielo Vista from 9am to 2pm

You may also call Ms. Lopez, Monday thru Friday at 915-434- 5014 or also donate through their GoFundMe page.

Texas Farm Bureau’s Thanksgiving Meal Report shows Increased Prices

(WACO, Texas)—A traditional, Texas-style Thanksgiving dinner for 10 will cost $48.85 this year, up $2.37 from a year ago, according to the special Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) Thanksgiving Meal Report.

The survey records the cost of 10 holiday staples—including turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and pecan pie. The 2016 report shows the average cost of this year’s holiday dinner rose 5.1 percent from last year’s price of $46.48.

Turkey prices held steady, with a 16-pound frozen turkey ringing in at $19.52.

“The turkey is the centerpiece of a Thanksgiving meal, and the price didn’t increase,” said TFB President Russell Boening. “The turkey is oftentimes the largest expense in our Thanksgiving grocery basket, so it’s nice to not see that ring an increase at the cash register.”

Turkey production has rebounded in recent years, which has helped hold the price at around $1.22 per pound.

Pecans, a Texas staple, saw a significant increase, due in large part to this year’s weather. Shelled and halved nuts were up 17.29 percent, or $1.70 per pound, from 2015 to 2016.

“Mother Nature dealt many Texas farmers and ranchers a tough hand this year,” Boening said. “Most of the Lone Star State received much needed rainfall, but some areas faced significant flooding.”

That had an effect on many crops, including pecans. The wet spring, followed by a dry summer and wet harvest season, led to a shorter crop of Texas pecans.

“It’s supply and demand at this point. The weather had an impact on the overall Texas crop,” Boening said. “Pecans cost more because there are fewer available.”

Of the 10 items surveyed, cubed stuffing, fresh sweet potatoes, frozen pie shells, whipping cream and frozen green beans also saw an increase.

The price of jellied cranberry sauce didn’t show a change, while whole milk and brown and serve rolls showed a decrease.

TFB’s fourth quarter Grocery Price Watch survey, taken in conjunction with the 2016 Thanksgiving Meal Report, also indicated a slight increase for household staples. Results from the quarterly survey of 16 common food products increased from $45.78 in the third quarter to $46.80 in the fourth quarter of this year.

TFB’s Thanksgiving Meal Report and Grocery Price Watch prices were reported by 39 volunteer shoppers at grocery stores statewide from Nov. 3-10.

TFB has released its Grocery Price Watch survey quarterly since March 2009.

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