window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag('js', new Date()); gtag('config', 'UA-29484371-30');
Saturday , June 6 2020
Covid-19 Fund 728
Elizabeth 728
West Texas Test Drive 728
ENTERPRISE 728
Amy’s Ambassadorship
john overall 728×90
EPCON_2020 728
Spring Training 728
Utep Football Generic 728
PBP_728
Mountains 728
Home | Tag Archives: vote2020

Tag Archives: vote2020

Info+Links: March 3rd Election – Unofficial Results LIVE NOW

Your one stop shop for ballots, info, and results. Please refresh the page in order to load the latest data.

**Note: due to the number of races, data and visitors – page loading time may be a bit delayed!**

Election Day results will be available after the polls close at 7 p.m.  Election officials release the early voting numbers at that time, followed by the general election numbers thereafter.

For an in-depth look at local races via their Voter’s Guide, visit out partners over at El Paso Matters; for a look at statewide issues, visit our partners at the Texas Tribune.

***

Election Day Polling Places (PDF)

Accessible Sample Ballot (This site allows you to mark your sample ballot online and print it for your own reference)

Democratic Party (PDF)
Republican Party (PDF)

For more information on local races and voter info, visit the El Paso County Election Website.

Here’s your Texas 2020 March primary ballot

Texas will hold its 2020 primary elections March 3 — it’s one of 14 states to participate in Super Tuesday — and hundreds of candidates across the state have filed to run for public office.

Here’s all of the candidates who have filed for the Democratic and Republican primary elections, according to the Secretary of State.

Each party will choose its candidate for U.S. president, U.S. Senate, congressional and legislative offices, the State Board of Education, the Railroad Commission and judicial seats.

Early voting begins Feb. 18. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote in the primary, the top two vote-getters will compete in a primary runoff May 26.

Texas is an open-primary state, so voters can decide every two years whether they’d rather help pick the Republican or the Democratic nominees (or hold out and go to third-party conventions).

Of note: Whatever primary you decide to vote in, you can only vote in that same party’s runoff, if a runoff is held. You can also vote for either party’s candidate in the general election.

Below, we’ve listed every race in the Democratic and Republican primary elections and highlighted 45 of the most interesting and competitive Races to Watch in the U.S. House and State House.

President

Texas is a big prize for Democratic presidential candidates in 2020. That’s because the state has a huge number of delegates — 228 — and it awards most them proportionally, meaning more than one candidate can secure some of them. At least some of the candidates on the ballot will have likely dropped out by primary election day, however, since Texas follows Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina on the primary calendar.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Bennet
D Joseph R. Biden
D Michael R. Bloomberg
D Cory Booker (dropped out)
D Pete Buttigieg
D Julián Castro (dropped out)
D Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente*
D John K. Delaney
D Tulsi Gabbard
D Amy Klobuchar
D Deval Patrick
D Bernie Sanders
D Tom Steyer
D Elizabeth Warren
D Robby Wells
D Marianne Williamson (dropped out)
D Andrew Yang

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente Guerra*
R Zoltan G. Istvan
R Matthew John Matern
R Bob Ely
R Donald J. Trump Incumbent
R Joe Walsh
R Bill Weld

* There are two people who go by the name of Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente on the Texas presidential ballot. The Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente running in the Democratic primary is the son of the Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente Guerra running in the Republican primary.

U.S. Senate

There’s a big field of Democrats vying to unseat Republican incumbent John Cornyn, but will any of them be able to generate the hype that Beto O’Rourke did in his 2018 race against Ted Cruz? Cornyn is expected to cruise through his primary. A runoff is likely on the Democratic side.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Bell
D Michael Cooper
D Amanda K. Edwards
D Jack Daniel Foster Jr.
D Annie “Mama” Garcia
D Victor Hugo Harris
D Mary “MJ” Hegar
D Sema Hernandez
D D. R. Hunter
D Adrian Ocegueda
D Cristina Tzinztún Ramirez
D Royce West

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Virgil Bierschwale
R John Anthony Castro
R John Cornyn Incumbent
R Dwayne Stovall
R Mark Yancey

U.S. House

There are competitive races up and down the ballot in the U.S. House in 2020. Democrats could mount serious challenges in as many as seven GOP-held districts. Republicans are hoping to retake two seats flipped by Democrats in 2018. But first there are competitive primaries, including in six districts where the Republican incumbent is retiring.
 

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hank Gilbert

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Johnathan Kyle Davidson
R Louie Gohmert Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 2

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elisa Cardnell
D Sima Ladjevardian
D Travis Olsen

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dan Crenshaw Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tanner Do
D Sean McCaffity
D Lulu Seikaly

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Van Taylor Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Russell Foster

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Ratcliffe Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Carolyn Salter

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lance Gooden Incumbent
R Don Hill

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Stephen Daniel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ron Wright Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 7

Six Republicans are vying to challenge Democratic Congresswoman Lizzie Fletcher, who flipped the seat for the Democrats in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lizzie Fletcher Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Maria Espinoza
R Wesley Hunt
R Jim Noteware
R Kyle Preston
R Laique Rehman
R Cindy Siegel

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 8

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Hernandez
D Laura Jones

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kevin Brady Incumbent
R Melissa Esparza-Mathis
R Kirk Osborn

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Al Green Incumbent
D Melissa Wilson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Julián A. Martinez
R Jon Menefee
R Johnny Teague

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 10

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Pritesh Gandhi
D Shannon Hutcheson
D Mike Siegel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael McCaul Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 11

Ten Republicans are vying to replace U.S. Rep. Mike Conaway in this solidly Republican seat.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jon Mark Hogg

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gene Barber
R Brandon Batch
R Jamie Berryhill
R J.D. Faircloth
R Casey Gray
R J. Ross Lacy
R Ned Luscombe
R August Pfluger
R Robert Tucker
R Wesley W. Virdell

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 12

Powerful U.S. Rep. Kay Granger faces a spirited primary challenge from the right in Chris Putnam.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Danny Anderson
D Lisa Welch

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kay Granger Incumbent
R Chris Putnam

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 13

Fifteen Republicans are vying to replace Congressman Mac Thornberry in this solidly red seat.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Timothy W. Gassaway
D Greg Sagan
D Gus Trujillo

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Catherine “I Swear” Carr
R Jamie Culley
R Chris Ekstrom
R Jason Foglesong
R Lee Harvey
R Elaine Hays
R Richard Herman
R Ronny Jackson
R Diane Knowlton
R Matt McArthur
R Mark Neese
R Asusena Reséndiz
R Vance Snider II
R Josh Winegarner
R Monique Worthy

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sanjanetta Barnes
D Adrienne Bell
D Eddie Fisher
D Robert “Puga” Thomas
D Mikal Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Joshua Foxworth
R Randy Weber Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Vicente González Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Monica De La Cruz-Hernandez
R Ryan Krause
R Tim Westley

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 16

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Veronica Escobar Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Anthony Aguero
R Jaime Arriola Jr.
R Patrick Hernandez-Cigarruista
R Irene Armendariz-Jackson
R Blanca Ortiz Trout
R Sam Williams

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 17

Twelve candidates are lining up to replace U.S. Rep. Bill Flores, including Pete Sessions, a former congressman from Dallas.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D William Foster III
D David Anthony Jaramillo
D Richard Kennedy

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ahmad Adnan
R Scott Bland
R George W. Hindman
R Todd Kent
R Laurie Godfrey McReynolds
R Jeff Oppenheim
R Kristen Alamo Rowin
R David Saucedo
R Pete Sessions
R Trent Sutton
R Renee Swann
R Elianor Vessali

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 18

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Allen
D Donovan Boson
D Marc Flores
D Jerry Ford Sr.
D Sheila Jackson Lee Incumbent
D Stevens Orozco
D Bimal Patel

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert M. Cadena
R Wendell Champion
R Nellie “Truly” Heiskell
R T.C. Manning
R Nathan J. Milliron
R Ava Reynero Pate

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 19

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tom Watson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jodey C. Arrington Incumbent
R Vance W. Boyd

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joaquin Castro Incumbent
D Rob Hostetler
D Justin Lecea

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary Allen
R Dominick Dina
R Mauro Garza
R Anita Kegley
R Tammy K. Orta

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 21

This race has the potential to be among the most high-profile in the November general election, when it’s expected that freshman U.S. Rep. Chip Roy will face off against former gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis. But first Davis faces a challenger in the Democratic primary.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Wendy R. Davis
D Jennie Lou Leeder

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Chip Roy Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 22

This race is a target for Democrats seeking to flip the seat blue. It will have competitive primaries on both sides. Incumbent Republican U.S Rep. Pete Olson is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Fernandez
D Sri Preston Kulkarni
D Nyanza Davis Moore
D Carmine Petricco III
D Derrick A. Reed

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Pierce Bush
R Jon Camarillo
R Douglas Haggard
R Aaron Hermes
R Greg Hill
R Matt Hinton
R Dan Mathews
R Diana Miller
R Troy Nehls
R Brandon T. Penko
R Shandon Phan
R Bangar Reddy
R Howard Steele
R Kathaleen Wall
R Joe Walz

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 23

This is a perennially swing district. Democrats are optimistic about their chances in 2020 because incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Will Hurd is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rosalinda “Rosey” Ramos Abuabara
D Jaime Escuder
D Gina Ortiz Jones
D Ricardo R. Madrid
D Efrain V. Valdez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Alma Arredondo-Lynch
R Darwin Boedeker
R Alía Ureste
R Tony Gonzales
R Cecil B. “Burt” Jones
R Jeff McFarlin
R Raul Reyes
R Sharon Breckenridge Thomas
R Ben Van Winkle

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 24

Democrats are also targeting this seat. Incumbent U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant is not seeking reelection.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Biggan
D Richard Fleming
D Crystal Fletcher
D Jan McDowell
D Kim Olson
D Candace Valenzuela
D Sam Vega

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sunny Chaparala
R David Fegan
R Jeron Liverman
R Desi Maes
R Beth Van Duyne

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 25

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Oliver
D Heidi Sloan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keith Neuendorff
R Roger Williams Incumbent

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 26

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Neil Durrance
D Carol H. Iannuzzi
D Mat Pruneda

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael Armstrong
R Michael C. Burgess Incumbent
R Jason Mrochek
R Jack Wyman

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 27

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ricardo “Rick” De La Fuente
D Charlie Jackson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Michael Cloud Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 28

Incumbent Congressman Henry Cuellar, one of the more moderate Democrats in the U.S. House, faces a primary challenge from the left.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica Cisneros
D Henry Cuellar Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sandra Whitten

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sylvia Garcia Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Schafranek
R Jaimy Z. Blanco

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hasani Burton
D Barbara Mallory Caraway
D Shenita “Shae” Cleveland
D Eddie Bernice Johnson Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tre Pennie

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 31

After MJ Hegar came close to winning this seat in 2018, six Democrats are hoping to knock off John Carter.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Edward Grimes
D Eric Hanke
D Donna Imam
D Dan Janjigian
D Christine Eady Mann
D Tammy Young

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Carter Incumbent
R Abhiram Garapati
R Christopher Wall
R Mike Williams

RACE TO WATCH

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 32

Five Republicans are vying to take on U.S. Rep. Colin Allred, who flipped the seat blue in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Colin Allred Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Genevieve Collins
R Jon Hollis
R Floyd McLendon
R Mark Sackett
R Jeff Tokar

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 33

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sean Paul Segura
D Marc Veasey Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Fabian Cordova Vasquez

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 34

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Osbert Rodriguez Haro III
D Filemon B. Vela Incumbent
D Diego Zavala

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Rey González
R Rod Lingsch

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 35

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rafael Alcoser III
D Lloyd Doggett Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R “Guillermo” William Hayward
R Nick Moutos
R Jenny Garcia Sharon

U.S. HOUSE DISTRICT 36

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rashad Lewis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brian Babin Incumbent
R RJ Boatman

Railroad Commissioner

In Texas, the Railroad Commission regulates the oil and gas industry, making it a hugely important elected board in the state. Members of the three-person board are elected statewide. One seat is up for election in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Roberto R. “Beto” Alonzo
D Chrysta Castañeda
D Kelly Stone
D Mark Watson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ryan Sitton Incumbent
R James “Jim” Wright

Supreme Court of Texas

Four of the nine seats on the Supreme Court are up for election in 2020. Justices are elected statewide, and Republicans currently hold all the seats. Democrats have fielded multiple candidates for each seat this year.

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Kathy Cheng
D Larry Praeger

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jane Bland Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 7

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandy Voss
D Staci Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Boyd Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS PLACE 8

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Peter Kelly
D Gisela D. Triana

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brett Busby Incumbent

SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS CHIEF JUSTICE

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Amy Clark Meachum
D Gerald Zimmerer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Nathan Hecht Incumbent

Texas Court Of Criminal Appeals

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals is the state’s highest criminal court. Members are elected statewide and are currently all Republican.

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D William Pieratt Demond
D Elizabeth Davis Frizell
D Dan Wood

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gina Parker
R Bert Richardson Incumbent

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tina Clinton
D Steven Miears

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kevin Patrick Yeary Incumbent

TEXAS COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS PLACE 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandon Birmingham

Republican

CANDIDATES
R David Newell Incumbent

State Board Of Education

There are 15 districts within the State Board of Education. Ten are held by Republicans, and five are held by Democrats. Four Republicans are not running for reelection, meaning a shake-up on the board is certain no matter which party prevails in each of the eight seats up for election.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Georgina Pérez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jennifer Ivey

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Larry McKinzie

Note: According to the Secretary of State’s website, the above candidate filed for the democratic primary for this seat. However, the seat is not up for election until 2022. We will update when we receive a clarification from the Texas Democratic Party.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rebecca Bell-Metereau
D Letti Bresnahan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Inga Cotton
R Robert Morrow
R Lani Popp

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Debra Kerner
D Kimberly McLeod
D Michelle Palmer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Hickman

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 8

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Audrey Young

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 9

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brenda Davis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keven M. Ellis Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 10

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Marsha Burnett-Webster
D Stephen Wyman

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Maynard Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Greg Alvord

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Maria Y. Berry
R Sue Melton-Malone Incumbent

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Betancourt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jay Johnson

Texas Senate

There are only a few competitive races in the Texas Senate in 2020, but the ones that are in play are hugely important. In the primary, state Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., the Democrat most likely to cross party lines in the Senate, faces a challenge from the left. In the general election, Democrats will try to unseat Republican Sen. Pete Flores and eliminate the supermajority that allows Republicans to bring a bill to the floor without Democratic support.
 

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 1

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Audrey Spanko

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bryan Hughes Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 4

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jay Stittleburg

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brandon Creighton Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Carol Alvarado Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 11

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Susan Criss
D Margarita Ruiz Johnson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Larry Taylor Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 12

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Randy Daniels
D Shadi Zitoon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jane Nelson Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 13

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard R. Andrews
D Borris L. Miles Incumbent
D Melissa Morris

Republican

CANDIDATES
R William J. Booher
R Milinda Morris

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 18

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Antalan

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lois W. Kolkhorst Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 19

This is a seat that traditionally leans blue, but Republican Pete Flores won it in a special election in 2018. Democrats are competing for the chance to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Roland Gutierrez
D Freddy Ramirez
D Xochil Peña Rodriguez
D Belinda Shvetz

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Peter P. “Pete” Flores Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Judy Cutright

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 21

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Judith Zaffirini Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Frank Pomeroy

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 22

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Robert Vick

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brian Birdwell Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 24

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Clayton Tucker

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dawn Buckingham Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 26

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D José Menéndez Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 27

Eddie Lucio Jr. is perhaps the most conservative Democrat in the Texas Senate. This year he’s facing a primary challenge from the left.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sara Stapleton Barrera
D Ruben Cortez
D Eddie Lucio Jr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Vanessa Tijerina

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 28

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charles Perry Incumbent

TEXAS SENATE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D César J. Blanco

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bethany Hatch

Texas House

The race for the Texas House might be the marquee political contest in the state in 2020. Democrats have a chance to gain control of the chamber for the first time since 2001. The primary will be relatively tame, however, with fewer intraparty fights among Republicans.
 

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 1

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary VanDeaver Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 2

Bryan Slaton narrowly lost a primary challenge to U.S. Rep. Dan Flynn in 2018. He’s one of two Republicans seeking to knock Flynn off in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Bill Brannon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dwayne “Doc” Collins
R Dan Flynn Incumbent
R Bryan Slaton

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 3

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Martin Shupp

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cecil Bell Jr. Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 4

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Keith Bell Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 5

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D LaWyanda Prince

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cole Hefner Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 6

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Gobble

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Schaefer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 7

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jay Dean Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 8

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cody Harris Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 9

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Chris Paddie Incumbent
R Mark Williams

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 10

This seat is open thanks to the impending retirement of state Rep. John Wray. The winner of the Republican primary will be the clear favorite to win the general election in November.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jake Ellzey
R Ryan Pitts
R Robert “Zack” Rader

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 11

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alec Johnson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Travis Clardy Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 12

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kyle Kacal Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 13

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ben Leman Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 14

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Janet Dudding
D Raza Rahman

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Raney Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 15

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lorena Perez McGill

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Steve Toth Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 16

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Metcalf Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 17

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Madeline Eden

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John P. Cyrier Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 18

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ernest Bailes Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 19

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James White Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 20

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica Tiedt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Terry M. Wilson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 21

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dade Phelan Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 22

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Deshotel Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jacorion Randle

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 23

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jeff Antonelli

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Mayes Middleton Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 24

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brian J. Rogers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Greg Bonnen Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 25

This seat is open thanks to the impending retirement of House Speaker Dennis Bonnen. The winner of the Republican primary will be the clear favorite to win the general election in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Patrick Henry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Troy T. Brimage
R Ro’Vin Garrett
R Rhonda Seth
R Mitch Thames
R Cody Thane Vasut

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 26

This seat became open after Republican state Rep. Rick Miller announced his retirement. Democrats are targeting the seat in November because Miller won it by just 5 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lawrence Allen Jr.
D L. “Sarah” DeMerchant
D Suleman Lalani
D Rish Oberoi

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Leonard N. Chan
R Jacey Jetton
R Matt Morgan

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 27

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ron Reynolds Incumbent
D Byron Ross

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Manish Seth
R Tom Virippan

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 28

Democrats see an opportunity to flip this seat after the resignation of state Rep. John Zerwas. They will get their first chance to gain a seat in a Jan. 28 special election.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Markowitz

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gary Gates
R Schell Hammel

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 29

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Travis Boldt

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ed Thompson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Vanessa Hicks-Callaway
R Geanie W. Morrison Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 31

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ryan Guillen Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Marian Knowlton

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 32

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Eric Holguin

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Todd Hunter Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 33

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Andy Rose

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Justin Holland Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 34

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Abel Herrero Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James Hernandez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 35

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Oscar Longoria Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 36

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sergio Muñoz Jr. Incumbent
D Abraham Padron

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 37

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alex Dominguez Incumbent
D Amber Medina

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 38

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Erin Gamez
D Eddie Lucio III Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 39

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Armando “Mando” Martinez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 40

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Terry Canales Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 41

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Gonzales
D Bobby Guerra Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John “Doc” Robert Guerra

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 42

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Peña Raymond Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 43

Republican

CANDIDATES
R J.M. Lozano Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 44

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Robert Bohmfalk

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Kuempel Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 45

State Rep. Erin Zwiener flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Liliana Posada
D Erin Zwiener Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Carrie Isaac
R Austin Talley
R Kent “Bud” Wymore

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 46

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sheryl Cole Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 47

State Rep. Vikki Goodwin flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Vikki Goodwin Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Justin Berry
R Jennifer Fleck
R Jenny Roan Forgey
R Aaron Reitz
R Don Zimmerman

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 48

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Donna Howard Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Bill Strieber

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 49

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gina Hinojosa Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jenai Aragona-Hales
R Charles Allan Meyer

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 50

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Celia Israel Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Larry Delarose

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 51

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Eddie Rodriguez Incumbent
D Joshua Sanchez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Reynolds

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 52

State Rep. James Talarico flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Talarico Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lucio Valdez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 53

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe P. Herrera

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Andrew S. Murr Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 54

Democrats expect this seat to be competitive after state Rep. Brad Buckley won reelection by 7 percentage points in 2018, and Democrat Beto O’Rourke narrowly lost it in his race for U.S. Senate.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Likeithia “Keke” Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brad Buckley Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 55

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Hugh D. Shine Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 56

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Katherine Turner-Pearson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charles “Doc” Anderson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 57

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jason Rogers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Trent Ashby Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 58

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Cindy Rocha

Republican

CANDIDATES
R DeWayne Burns Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 59

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Cody Johnson
R J.D. Sheffield Incumbent
R Shelby Slawson

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 60

This is an open seat after the retirement of state Rep. Mike Lang. The winner of the Republican primary will be the overwhelming favorite in the November general election.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jon Francis
R Christopher M. Perricone
R Glenn Rogers
R Kellye SoRelle

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 61

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christopher Cox

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Phil King Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 62

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gary D. Thomas

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Reggie Smith Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 63

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Leslie Peeler

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tan Parker Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 64

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Lynn Stucky won reelection by 8 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Angela Brewer

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lynn Stucky Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 65

State Rep. Michelle Beckley flipped this seat in 2018, but she faces a primary challenger. Republicans are also eyeing it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michelle Beckley Incumbent
D Paige Dixon

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Nancy Cline
R Kronda Thimesch

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 66

This race is a high priority target for Democrats after state Rep. Matt Shaheen won reelection by less than 1 percentage point in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sharon Hirsch
D Aimee Garza Lopez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Shaheen Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 67

This race is a target for Democrats after state Rep. Jeff Leach won reelection by fewer than 3 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tom Adair
D Rocio Gosewehr Hernandez
D Anthony Lo
D Lorenzo Sanchez

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Leach Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 68

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Patsy Ledbetter

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Drew Springer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 69

Republican

CANDIDATES
R James B. Frank Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 70

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Angie Bado

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Scott Sanford Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 71

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Samuel Hatton

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Stan Lambert Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 72

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Drew Darby Incumbent
R Lynette Lucas

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 73

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Stephanie Phillips

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Kyle Biedermann Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 74

This seat is open after the retirement of state Rep. Poncho Nevárez. The Democrat who wins the primary will be heavily favored in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rowland Garza
D Eddie Morales Jr.

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ruben Falcon
R Robert Garza

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 75

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Mary E. González Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 76

This seat is open after state Rep. Cesar Blanco announced he’s running for state Senate. The Democrat who wins in the primary will be heavily favored in November.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Claudia Ordaz Perez
D Elisa Tamayo

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 77

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Evelina (Lina) Ortega Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 78

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Moody Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeffrey Lane

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 79

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Art Fierro Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 80

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Tracy King Incumbent
D Danny Valdez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 81

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Brooks Landgraf Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 82

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Craddick Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 83

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Barrick
D Addison Perry-Franks

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dustin Burrows Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 84

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Gibson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Frullo Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 85

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joey Cardenas III

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Abolaji Tijani Ayobami
R Robert Boettcher
R Phil Stephenson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 86

Republican

CANDIDATES
R John Smithee Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 87

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Four Price Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 88

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ken King Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 89

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sugar Ray Ash
D Jon Cocks

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Candy Noble Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 90

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ramon Romero Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Elva Camacho

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 91

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jeromey Sims

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Stephanie Klick Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 92

This seat is open after state Rep. Jonathan Stickland announced he wasn’t running for reelection. It is a Democratic target after Stickland won by fewer than 3 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Steven Riddell
D Jeff Whitfield

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jeff Cason
R Taylor Gillig
R Jim Griffin

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 93

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Matt Krause won reelection by 8 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lydia Bean

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Matt Krause Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 94

Democrats hope this seat will be competitive after state Rep. Tony Tinderholt won reelection by about 9 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alisa Simmons

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tony Tinderholt Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 95

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Nicole Collier Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 96

This seat is a Democratic target after state Rep. Bill Zedler won reelection by fewer than 4 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joe Drago

Republican

CANDIDATES
R David Cook

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 97

Democrats are hopeful they can win this seat after U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, only won the district by 2 percentage points at the top of the ballot in 2018. Goldman won reelection by 8 percentage points.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth Beck
D Dan Willis

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Craig Goldman Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 98

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Debra Edmondson

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Giovanni Capriglione Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 99

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Charlie Geren Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 100

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D James Armstrong III
D Lorraine Birabil
D Daniel Davis Clayton
D Sandra Jonelle Crenshaw
D Jasmine Felicia Crockett
D Paul K. Stafford

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 101

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Chris Turner Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 102

Ana-Maria Ramos flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to flip it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ana-Maria Ramos Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Linda Koop
R Rick Walker

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 103

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rafael M. Anchia Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jerry Fortenberry II
R Sherry Lee Mecom

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 104

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jessica González Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 105

Thresa “Terry” Meza flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by nearly 10 percentage points. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Terry Meza Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Gerson Hernandez

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 106

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jennifer Skidonenko

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jared Patterson Incumbent
R James Trombley

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 107

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Victoria Neave Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Samuel Smith

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 108

Flipping this seat is a top priority for Democrats after state Rep. Morgan Meyer won reelection by less than 1 percentage point in 2018. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, lost the district by more than 15 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Joanna Cattanach
D Tom Ervin
D Shawn D. Terry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Morgan Meyer Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 109

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christopher L. Graham
D Carl O. Sherman Sr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dr. Eugene Allen

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 110

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Toni Rose Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 111

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Yvonne Davis Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 112

This seat is a top Democratic target after state Rep. Angie Chen Button won reelection by 2 percentage points in 2018.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Brandy K. Chambers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Angie Chen Button Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 113

State Rep. Rhetta Bowers flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by 7 percentage points. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Rhetta Andrews Bowers Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Will Douglas
R Bill Metzger

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 114

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John Turner Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Luisa Del Rosal

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 115

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Julie Johnson Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Karyn Brownlee

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 116

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Evan Bohl
D Trey Martinez Fischer Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Robert Litoff
R Fernando Padron

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 117

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Philip Cortez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Carlos Antonio Raymond

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 118

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Leo Pacheco Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Adam Salyer

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 119

This seat is open as incumbent state Rep. Roland Gutierrez runs for state Senate.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Elizabeth “Liz” Campos
D Jennifer Ramos
D Sean Villasana

Republican

CANDIDATES
R George B. Garza

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 120

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Barbara Gervin-Hawkins Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ronald Payne
R Andrew Fernandez Vicencio

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 121

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Becca Moyer DeFelice
D Jack Guerra
D Celina Montoya

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Steve Allison Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 122

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Claire Barnett

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lyle Larson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 123

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Diego Bernal Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 124

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ina Minjarez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 125

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ray Lopez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 126

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Undrai F. Fizer
D Natali Hurtado

Republican

CANDIDATES
R E. Sam Harless Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 127

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Dwight Ford
R Dan Huberty Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 128

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Josh Markle
D Mary E. Williams

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Briscoe Cain Incumbent
R Robert C. Hoskins

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 129

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Kayla Alix

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Ryan Lee
R Dennis Paul Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 130

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Bryan J. Henry

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tom Oliverson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 131

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Alma A. Allen Incumbent
D Carey Lashley
D Elvonte Patton

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 132

State Rep. Gina Calanni narrowly flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018, winning by less than half of one percentage point. Republicans will try to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gina Calanni Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Angelica Garcia
R Mike Schofield

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 133

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Sandra G. Moore

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jim Murphy Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 134

Democrat Beto O’Rourke won this district by more than 20 percentage points in 2018, though incumbent Republican state Rep. Sarah Davis held onto her seat by 6 percentage points. Democrats hope to flip it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Lanny Bose
D Ann Johnson
D Ruby Powers

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Sarah Davis Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 135

State rep. John Rosenthal flipped this seat for the Democrats in 2018. Republicans hope to win it back in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jon E. Rosenthal Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Merrilee Rosene Beazley
R Justin Ray

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 136

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D John H. Bucy III Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Mike Guevara

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 137

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Gene Wu Incumbent

RACE TO WATCH

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 138

This is an open seat after Republican state Rep. Dwayne Bohac decided not to run for reelection. Bohac won in 2018 by 0.1 percentage points, Democrats hope to flip it in 2020.

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Akilah Bacy
D Jenifer Rene Pool
D Josh Wallenstein

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Josh Flynn*
R Lacey Hull
R Claver T. Kamau-Imani

* Josh Flynn was declared ineligible for the primary by the Harris County Republican Party after the December 10 candidate filing deadline. According to the Secretary of State, his name will remain on the ballot, but if he wins the election outright, the precinct chairs will pick the nominee.

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 139

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Jarvis D. Johnson Incumbent
D Angeanette Thibodeaux

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 140

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Armando Lucio Walle Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 141

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Willie Roaches Franklyn
D Senfronia Thompson Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 142

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Richard Bonton
D Jerry Davis
D Natasha Ruiz
D Harold V. Dutton Jr. Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Jason Rowe

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 143

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Ana Hernandez Incumbent

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 144

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Mary Ann Perez Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Tony Salas

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 145

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Christina Morales Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Martha Elena Fierro

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 146

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Shawn Nicole Thierry Incumbent
D Ashton P. Woods

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 147

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Garnet F. Coleman Incumbent
D Colin Ross
D Aurelia Wagner

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 148

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Anna Eastman
D Adrian Garcia
D Cynthia Reyes-Revilla
D Penny Morales Shaw
D Emily Wolf

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Luis LaRotta

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 149

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Hubert Vo Incumbent

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Lily Truong

TEXAS HOUSE DISTRICT 150

Democrat

CANDIDATES
D Michael Robert Walsh

Republican

CANDIDATES
R Valoree Swanson Incumbent

Author: CARLA ASTUDILLOThe Texas Tribune

Analysis: Two more months of musical chairs for Texans seeking office in 2020

Want to play parlor games?

Texas candidates who want to run in 2020 don’t have to declare their plans for another couple of months, leaving time for all sorts of crazy twists and turns before the election ballots are set.

Dec. 9 at 6 p.m. is the filing deadline for 2020 candidates in Texas. Here’s a lesser-known rule: Nobody can officially file to run for office until Nov. 9. All of that means nobody has paid the entry fee and signed his or her name to get on the ballot; many have started campaign finance operations, but those filings don’t put a candidate on the ballot.

The reasons for running, or not running, are still being created. On Monday, U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, a Clarendon Republican elected in 1994, said he won’t seek another term in office.

That particular development doesn’t create much opportunity for Democrats; Thornberry’s district is strawberry red. He won reelection in 2018 with 81.5% of the vote — with both a Democrat and a Libertarian in the competition. But for ambitious Republicans, it opens a door that has been locked for a quarter of a century. People will be filing for that election now who, with Thornberry in office, wouldn’t even have whispered about it.

Open seats like that — Thornberry is the sixth Texas Republican member of Congress to decide it’s time to collect that fat congressional pension — prompt changes in plans. Three of those — Thornberry, Mike Conaway of Midland and Bill Flores of Bryan — represent districts that would be difficult to impossible for Democrats to win. But three — Will Hurd of Helotes, Kenny Marchant of Coppell and Pete Olson of Sugar Land — are in seats Democrats could win. In fact, each of them survived a good scare on the way back into office in 2018: Hurd won by a 0.44-percentage-point margin, Marchant by 3.1 points and Olson by 4.9 points.

Author: ROSS RAMSEYThe Texas Tribune

Editor’s note: If you’d like an email notice whenever we publish Ross Ramsey’s column, click here.

Read related Tribune coverage

Analysis: A one-subject election year for Texas (and everyone else)

If the political conversation one year from now is what it is today, every candidate on the ballot — from the people seeking the presidency to the people running for local school boards — is going to have to take a position on impeachment.

And if the storyline has changed by then, it will be less a change in subject than another season of a familiar TV show about the adventures of Donald Trump.

Sure, local issues will be debated here and there, but the election year ahead — at least right now — is shaping up to be more like a referendum on national events and personalities.

Particularly the attention-gobbling personality in the White House.

The furor over Trump’s impeachment might not be in the headlines in a year, fading like the Mueller report did, but it’s hard to imagine a pre-election climate that isn’t centered on his reelection bid.

And it’s hard to imagine a campaign season that doesn’t force every candidate on the ballot — friend or foe of the president — to take a position attacking or defending him.

You don’t have to wait a year to see this happening. It’s happening now.

It’s not that local and state issues are of no concern. That list is long and full of difficult policy problems.

It includes the constitutionally protected use, possession and sale of guns, and how to respond to four mass shootings in Texas in less than two years — in Sutherland Springs, Santa Fe, El Paso and Odessa.

It includes access to health care, an issue that helped propel some of the Democrats who got better-than-expected results in their 2018 races and one that has a central role in the Democratic presidential primary debates.

And the list includes public education, which became a major issue in 2018, especially in Republican primaries and the general election.

Other issues from previous elections and legislative sessions are still of high importance to some voters, like property taxes, state spending and the state’s enforcement efforts at the Texas-Mexico border. It includes prosaic issues, like getting rid of the long lines at driver’s license facilities, highway expansion and repair, scooters on streets, homeless Texans, marijuana legalization and whether people can buy beer on Sunday mornings. All the things, and more.

But the election conversation at the moment is more likely to pivot around the presidential race and candidates’ relation to it, however near or far they are from Washington, D.C.

Right now, that’s about impeachment.

A year ago, it was about the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh.

In between, the Mueller report was at the top of the political charts.

Cutting through that with local issues, no matter how compelling, is difficult. Those will be in the mix — and will decide some races. Unless something changes, however, the driving issues in this election cycle — the ones that motivate voters — will be the ones emanating from the loudest voice in national politics.

If Trump is unpopular, Democrats will be delighted. If he’s popular — and the advantage in presidential races usually belongs to the incumbent — the Republicans will be overjoyed.

Either way, he’s likely to be the subject, and his competition for attention in Texas next year is thin — the top statewide offices won’t be on the ballot, the U.S. Senate race won’t have Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke spurring interest, and every other candidate on the ballot will be struggling to win attention away from the people at the top of the ballot.

Texas candidates could very well end up doing what they’re doing to elbow their way into your attention right now: commenting and opining about the news coming out of Washington, in the world of Donald Trump.

Whatever that happens to be.

Author:  ROSS RAMSEYThe Texas Tribune

Editor’s note: If you’d like an email notice whenever we publish Ross Ramsey’s column, click here.

Read related Tribune coverage

Turnout among young Texas voters exploded in 2018. Groups want to make it even bigger in 2020.

The next presidential election may be more than a year away, but groups working to get young people in the state civically engaged have been beefing up their operations for a while now.

One of those groups, MOVE Texas, has experienced a massive growth in staff, organizers and investments.

“Our budget has increased something near 900% in the past two years,” said Charlie Bonner, MOVE’s communications manager. “We are really seeing people start to invest in Texas in a way they never have before.”

Texas has one of the youngest populations in the country. In fact, only Utah, Alaska and the District of Columbia have younger populations – and not by much. It’s projected that by 2022, one in three voters in Texas will be under 30.

“There is a lot of potential there,” said Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, a lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs. “Young folks don’t tend to register, don’t tend to vote at the same rates that older folks do.”

A historically bad investment

Low turnout in years past has hampered big investments into young voters until somewhat recently.

Texas has one of the worst voter participation rates overall — and youth voter turnout is particularly dire. In 2014, for example, just 8% of Texas youth turned out to vote.

Rae Martinez, who works for a youth voter engagement effort called Texas Rising, said investing in young voters in Texas has largely fallen to nonprofits because campaigns see it as a bad investment.

“Sometimes when campaigns come along the investment in young people isn’t as strong as maybe in organizations who primarily serve young people,” Martinez said. “Because campaigns have felt that young people wouldn’t turn out for them.”

But things have started to change.

Triple the turnout

During the last election, turnout among Texas voters under 30 tripled compared to the previous midterm election.

“2018 reversed the trend that we’d been seeing in terms of decline in voter turnout among youth and among Latinos,” DeFrancesco Soto said.

That change is also part of the reason the state experienced one of the closest statewide elections in decades, when Democratic Congressman Beto O’Rourke lost to incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz by less than 3 percentage points.

Martinez said that close election made it easier to raise money for efforts aimed at getting even more young people and people of color to vote.

Massive investments

“The increase in youth voter participation in 2018 ­— donors are excited about that,” Martinez said. “They want to see that continue to grow.”

And Texas Rising plans to register thousands of new young voters ahead of 2020.

Bonner said between now and that presidential election, MOVE Texas alone plans to register 100,000 young voters.

“It’s a lot,” he said. “So we are massively scaling to be able to meet that and expanding into new cities, hiring new organizers and training as many young people as possible to be volunteer deputy registrars.”

It’s not just big investments in organizing that is slowly making Texas’ electorate younger. Martinez said young voters are also responding to policies and decisions being made that many of them they don’t agree with.

“There’s a lot of bad stuff that’s happening right now,” Martinez said. “I think that people on campus that we are encountering want to do something. They want to have a say in the political process.”

Looking to 2020

The combination of all this is why DeFrancesco Soto said she thinks youth voter turnout could be even bigger next year.

“I think we are going to see that trend continue — and then be popped up a little bit more by the sheer fact that you always have higher turnout, higher engagement in presidential year elections,” she said.

And for organizers who have been doing this work for a while, this is about more than 2020. Bonner said this is also about investing in the state’s future and making sure its electorate more accurately reflects its population.

“If we get [young] folks to vote in two to three elections, they become lifelong voters,” he said. “And so this election, after that massive growth in 2018, it is going to be critical to creating that habit for young voters.”

Author: ASHLEY LOPEZ, KUT NEWS – The Texas Tribune

Disclosure: MOVE Texas and the University of Texas at Austin-LBJ School of Public Affairs have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here.

Beto O’Rourke releases 10 years of tax returns

Former congressman Beto O’Rourke released 10 years’ worth of tax returns Monday night, becoming the latest 2020 presidential contender to reveal information about his personal finances.

The Democratic candidate’s disclosure came shortly after Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who is also running for president, released his tax returns dating back to 2009.

The returns show that O’Rourke and his wife, Amy, made more than $370,000 in 2017, the most recent year for which they released returns. That amount includes O’Rourke’s $162,211 salary as a member of Congress representing Texas and more than $11,000 from Stanton Street Technology, an El Paso-based Internet company O’Rourke co-founded in 1999.

It also includes about $53,000 in income from the Council on Regional Economic Expansion and Educational Development, or CREEED. Amy O’Rourke has worked as a consultant for the philanthropic organization, which aims to improve the academic performance of students in the El Paso area.

Earlier in the day, O’Rourke told reporters that he would release his tax returns in an effort to be transparent with voters — and he criticized President Trump for not doing the same.

“If he must be compelled through a subpoena to do so, so be it,” O’Rourke said, following a town hall in Charlotte on Monday morning. “But everyone who runs to seek that office should release their taxes.”

Read related Tribune coverage

Jenna Johnson in Charlotte and Michael Scherer in Washington contributed to this report.

Author:  FELICIA SONMEZ, THE WASHINGTON POST

Rep. Mary González Announces “Positivity in Politics” Initiative

On Friday, State Representative Mary González announced the “Positivity in Politics” initiative, which seeks to highlight examples of positivity in grassroots leadership over the next two years leading up to the 2020 Presidential Election.

“After Donald Trump’s comments yesterday, anyone could be forgiven for feeling that divisive rhetoric and antagonism have taken the place of policy-making. But it doesn’t have to be this way. That is why today I am announcing the ‘Positivity in Politics’ campaign. Over the next two years, we will be recognizing communities across Texas coming together, in the true spirit of America, to reject negativity and work together for a better future.” Rep. González said.

“People of color, LGBTQ folks, and other marginalized communities deserve to have their voices amplified and their work recognized,” said Rep. González. “I am looking forward to helping share their stories through my ‘Positivity in Politics’ initiative.”

If residents know of a leader, organization, or community they would like to be recognized, they contact Representative González’s office at (512) 463-0613.

West Texas Test Drive 728
Spring Training 728
Utep Football Generic 728
PBP_728
EPCON_2020 728
Mountains 728
Amy’s Ambassadorship
Elizabeth 728
Get Shift Done 728
ENTERPRISE 728
john overall 728×90
Covid-19 Fund 728