window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag('js', new Date()); gtag('config', 'UA-29484371-30');
Saturday , November 17 2018
Home | Tag Archives: west nile

Tag Archives: west nile

Mosquitoes in El Paso’s Mission Valley Test Positive for St. Louis Encephalitis

On Wednesday, the City of El Paso Department of Public Health announced that a mosquito pool has tested positive for the St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV).

The mosquitoes that tested positive in this study came from the Mission Valley area. Mosquitoes carrying the SLEV were last detected in El Paso in 2017.

“This disease is very similar to West Nile virus which we are all too familiar with in the border region,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “We need our community to be informed about the disease and for the medical community to begin testing for this disease, if indicated, so that we can determine if it is being spread locally.”

The disease is spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito but has not been detected in a human in the El Paso area since 1982.

At this time, there have been no confirmed cases of SLEV in El Paso, but there are five confirmed cases of West Nile so far this season. There are no vaccines to prevent nor medications to treat SLEV, and care is based on symptoms.

Most people infected with SLEV have no apparent illness. Initial symptoms of those who become ill include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and tiredness.

Severe neuroinvasive disease (often involving encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain) occurs more commonly in older adults. In rare cases, long-term disability or death can result.

Residents can reduce your risk of being infected with SLEV by practicing the same mosquito bite prevention that has been stressed by public health officials in order to prevent other diseases such as West Nile virus.

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with other diseases such as Zika can be active throughout the day; residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

 

For more information on the Public Health Department, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or

www.EPSalud.com.

Health Officials: Fourth Case of West Nile Virus Confirmed in El Paso

The Department of Public Health has confirmed a fourth case of West Nile Virus this season in El Paso. The patient is a man under the age of 20, who lives in Northeast El Paso. He has no underlying medical conditions.

“The current weather conditions, with rain and warm temperatures, are creating the perfect situation for increased mosquito breeding,” said Department of Public Health Assistant Director Bruce Parsons. “Considering that it only takes a teaspoon of stagnant water to enable breeding, we need everyone in our community to tip and toss any items that are collecting rainwater outside their homes.”

There were 14 human cases of West Nile confirmed in El Paso last year and the most recent deaths associated with the disease were two deaths in 2015.

In addition to the practice of “tip and toss”, residents are encouraged to report large areas of standing water that may be breeding mosquitoes to the Environmental Services Department by calling 3-1-1. Residents can ‘fight the bite’ by reducing the spread of mosquito borne diseases using these prevention methods:

 

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with other diseases such asZika can be active throughout the day; residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

The following are the cases confirmed in El Paso so far this season:

  1. Male 20’s No Underlying Medical Conditions
  2. Male 70’s Underlying Medical Conditions
  3. Female 60’s Underlying Medical Conditions
NEW 4. Male Teen No Underlying Medical Conditions

For more information on the Public Health Department, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com.

 

Public Health Department Confirms Second Case of West Nile in El Paso

The Department of Public Health has confirmed a second case of West Nile Virus this season in El Paso.

The patient is a man in his early 70’s who lives in West El Paso. He has underlying medical conditions but is recovering from the infection. The first case this season involved a man in his early 20’s who also lives in West El Paso.

“With rain expected in our area over the next several days, we need to be sure to empty any standing water in order to prevent breeding the mosquitoes that carry this disease,” said Department of Public Health Lead Epidemiologist Fernando Gonzalez. “We have more positive mosquito pools identified across the City and we must be proactive in protecting ourselves and our families.”

There were 14 human cases of West Nile confirmed in El Paso last year and the most recent deaths associated with the disease were two deaths in 2015.

The Department of Public Health is asking residents to help ‘fight the bite’ by reducing the spread of mosquito borne diseases using these prevention methods:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with other diseases such as Zika can be active throughout the day; residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

For more information on the Public Health Department, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or

www.EPSalud.com.

Health Department: First Case of West Nile in El Paso Confirmed

On Wednesday, the Department of Public Health has confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in El Paso this season.

The patient is a man in his early 20’s who lives in West El Paso. Authorities say he has no associated medical conditions and is recovering from the virus.

“It seems as though we are beginning the mosquito season later than usual this year,” said Department of Public Health Lead Epidemiologist Fernando Gonzalez. “We know we have mosquitoes infected with West Nile Virus around El Paso, and need to make sure we stay vigilant about protecting ourselves from getting bitten.”

There were 14 human cases of West Nile confirmed in El Paso last year and the most recent deaths associated with the disease were two deaths in 2015.

The Department of Public Health is asking residents to help ‘fight the bite’ by reducing the spread of mosquito borne diseases using these prevention methods:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

For more information on the Department of Public Health, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com.

El Paso DPH Observes National Mosquito Control Awareness Week

In observance of National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, the Public Health and Environmental Services Departments are teaming up with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent mosquito bites, and mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile Virus, Chikungunya, Dengue, and Zika.

Mayor Dee Margo and City Council will proclaim Wednesday, June 27, 2018 “Zika Action Day” at Tuesday’s City Council meeting.

In addition, health educators from the DPH will be visiting with parents and children in the Socorro area to teach the importance of preventing these diseases. Zika virus spreads through the bite of an infected mosquito, sexual intercourse, blood transfusion, and from a mother to her fetus. As a part of these presentations, the DPH will be providing women of childbearing age a kit, which includes repellent, condoms, and educational materials.

Residents can take part by following the Public Health Department on Facebook and Twitter to help spread the word. Sharing our daily posts could help save a life.

Mosquito Control Awareness Week began June 24 and runs through June 30, 2018. For more information on the Public Health Department, call 2-1-1 or visit their English-language webpage or the Spanish-language page.

The El Paso Department of Public Health is asking residents to help ‘fight the bite’ by reducing the spread of mosquito borne diseases using these prevention methods:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

Mosquitoes Trapped in El Paso Test Positive for West Nile Virus

The City of El Paso Department of Public Health has been notified that one of several mosquito pools collected here have tested positive for West Nile Virus.

“When it comes to West Nile virus it is never really a question of ‘if’ we can expect to see the disease locally, but rather ‘when”, said Robert Resendes, Public Health Director. “What we can do is be proactive against being bitten and be aware that there are other diseases that could present themselves in El Paso.”

The Vector Control Program with the Environmental Services Department has been setting traps this season since May. The mosquito pool that tested positive was located in the central part of town within the 79903 zip code.

In years past, human cases of diseases like Chikungunya, Dengue, and Zika virus have been seen in El Paso but in travel-associated cases only. El Paso has yet to see a locally acquired case of these diseases. When it comes to West Nile, there have been no cases reported this season, but a total of 14 human cases were confirmed locally last year.

As we continue to see sporadic rains in the area, residents are reminded that it only takes a teaspoon of water to create breeding conditions around your home.

El Pasoans are urged to “Tip and Toss” items outside their homes frequently, to prevent stagnant water which could result in mosquito breeding. Residents should also follow these tips.

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

For more information on the Public Health Department, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com

Department of Health: Zika Prevention Season Begins Now

With the arrival of spring and the increase of people and businesses watering, the Public Health Department reminds everyone to be mindful of mosquitoes.

“We have lived with West Nile virus making the rounds in El Paso for many years,” said Public Health Director Robert Resendes. “Now we’re also trying to prevent locally-acquired cases of the Zika virus which can lead to severe birth defects and even lead to still births. That is why pregnant women are encouraged to avoid all mosquito bites and to inform their healthcare provider if they have any of the symptoms associated with Zika such as fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes).”

As temperatures start to climb, the department urges residents to prevent mosquito breeding, mosquito bites and mosquito-borne diseases that can have a devastating impact on the community.

While El Paso has not had any cases of Zika virus, there have been three imported cases of Zika going back to 2016. Although the mosquitoes that are associated with Zika are different from those that transmit West Nile virus, both types of mosquitoes exist in El Paso County.

Fortunately, many of the mosquito prevention measures are the same for all mosquitoes.

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain DEET when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

Residents can also mosquito-proof their home by repairing screens on windows and doors in order to keep out mosquitoes. If you know of an area where ponding and/or mosquito breeding is taking place, you can call vector control by dialing 3-1-1.

For mosquito bite prevention tips, follow the department on Facebook and Twitter or visit the City of El Paso YouTube channel for a story on Zika season in the latest Your City in 5 segment.

For more information on the Public Health Department call 2-1-1.

Two New West Nile Virus Cases Brings Total to 13

Two new confirmed cases of West Nile Virus in two El Paso men brings the total number of cases in El Paso to 13 so far this season.

The new cases involve a man in his 70’s who lives in the Mission Valley and a man in his early 60’s who lives on the city’s eastside. Both have reported underlying medical conditions.

Health officials credit local health care providers for properly identifying cases and following through with reporting this notifiable disease.

“We invite the community to join us and take mosquito-borne disease prevention seriously,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “This weekend’s Zika Action Day event will provide an opportunity for families and individuals to learn and gain a better understanding of what they can do to help prevent diseases like West Nile Virus and Zika.”

The Zika Action Day will take place on Saturday, September 23, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at Memorial Park located at the corner of Luna Street and Wheeling Avenue.

The following is a compilation of cases identified by Department of Public Health Epidemiology Division so far this year:

Case Gender Age Residence  
13 Male Early 60’s Eastside New
12 Male Early 70’s Mission Valley New
11 Male Mid 20’s Central
10 Male Late 50’s Mission Valley
9 Male Late 70’s Westside
8 Female Late 60’s Central
7 Female Early 70’s East Colonia
6 Male Mid 70’s Socorro
5 Male Late 40’s Westside
4 Male Mid 70’s Central
3 Male Mid 40’s Mission Valley
2 Male Early 50’s Eastside
1 Male Mid 40’s Eastside

The most effective way to avoid West Nile virus disease and other mosquito-borne illnesses, is to prevent mosquito bites. Defend yourself by using the 4 D’s:
• DEET – Use insect repellents when you go outdoors.

• DRESS – When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.

• DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.

• DRAIN – Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around and outside your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

West Nile Virus Cases Double Last Week

A total of six new cases of West Nile Virus confirmed over the past week has brought the total number of cases in El Paso to 11 so far this season.

“We need to remember that it takes about a teaspoon of water to create breeding conditions for mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus,” said Lead Epidemiologist Fernando Gonzalez.

“As soon as we see rain, we need to start thinking about getting outside our homes and getting rid of it,” Gonzalez added

The news comes as the Sun City continues to experience seasonal rains with more expected in the coming days.

To report standing water or mosquito breeding, call 3-1-1.

The following is a compilation of cases identified by Department of Public Health epidemiologist:

Case Gender Age Residence  
11 Male Mid 20’s Central New
10 Male Late 50’s Mission Valley New
9 Male Late 70’s Westside New
8 Female Late 60’s Central New
7 Female Early 70’s East Colonia New
6 Male Mid 70’s Socorro New
5 Male Late 40’s Westside
4 Male Mid 70’s Central
3 Male Mid 40’s Mission Valley
2 Male Early 50’s Eastside
1 Male Mid 40’s Eastside

The most effective way to avoid mosquito-borne illnesses, is to prevent mosquito bites and use the 4 D’s:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents that contain deet when outdoors.
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Drain standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, and birdbaths.

Residents can also mosquito-proof their home by repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.  For more information on mosquitoes, visit www.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com.

Fifth West Nile Virus Case Confirmed in El Paso

An El Paso man in his late 40s has become the fifth confirmed person in El Paso to be diagnosed with West Nile Virus in El Paso this year.

The man lives in West El Paso and does not have a history of recent travel. The patient does have underlying medical conditions, but is recovering at home.

“It is not too late to start taking West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne diseases seriously,” said Lead Epidemiologist Fernando Gonzalez. “We ask all residents to do their part to remove standing rainwater and other stagnant water around their home and encourage them to check with neighbors, especially the elderly who may need assistance to remove items that are soaked.”

The most effective way to avoid West Nile virus disease and other mosquito-borne illnesses, is to prevent mosquito bites. Defend yourself by using the 4 D’s:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents when you go outdoors.
  • DRESS – When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents     should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around and outside your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

Residents can also mosquito-proof their home by installing or repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out. To report standing water or mosquito breeding, call 3-1-1.

In effort to increase awareness about the disease and ways the public can protect themselves, the Department has added a West Nile Virus session to the list of presentations offered by the Speakers Bureau. Local civic and community organizations can schedule a presentation that will include background on the disease, prevention methods, as well as what people can look out for in regards to signs and symptoms of infection.

Presentations can be scheduled by visiting the website and clicking on “Special Projects.”

For more information on the programs and services provided by the Department of Public Health, call 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com.

 

Fourth West Nile Virus Case Confirmed in El Paso

An elderly man in his 70s has become the fourth confirmed person in El Paso to be diagnosed with West Nile Virus in El Paso this year.

According to El Paso Department of Public Health officials, the man lives in Central El Paso and does not have a history of recent travel.

The patient does have underlying medical conditions, but is recovering at home.

“City officials are testing mosquitoes from all parts of town, and a great many of them are coming back positive for West Nile Virus,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “Every time it rains we need to remember about draining standing water outside our homes in order to prevent this deadly disease.”

The most effective way to avoid West Nile virus disease and other mosquito-borne illnesses, is to prevent mosquito bites. Defend yourself by using the 4 D’s:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents when you go outdoors. Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection. To optimize safety and effectiveness, repellents should be used according to the label instructions.
  • DRESS – When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors. Mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent will give extra protection. Don’t apply repellents containing permethrin directly to skin. Rather, spray permethrin-containing products only on clothing.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around and outside your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

Residents can also mosquito-proof their home by installing or repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out. To report standing water or mosquito breeding, call 3-1-1.

Second Case of West Nile Confirmed this Season

The City of El Paso Department of Public Health has confirmed a second case of West Nile Virus in El Paso. The patient is a man in his early 50’s who lives in the city’s Eastside. He does not have any underlying medical conditions and is currently recovering at home.

The first case of West Nile Virus confirmed this season was in May involving a man in his mid-40’s who also resides in East El Paso. A total of six West Nile Virus cases were reported last season.

“With West Nile Virus, and now Zika presenting a threat to our community we need everyone to do their part including draining standing water around their homes,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist.

Department officials are urging residents to “Tip and Toss” items in their yards to prevent standing water. It takes less than a tablespoon of water to provide a breeding ground for moquitoes. Residents are also reminded to practice the “four Ds”:

  • DEET – Use insect repellents when you go outdoors. Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection. To optimize safety and effectiveness, repellents should be used according to the label instructions.
  • DRESS – When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors. Mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent will give extra protection. Don’t apply repellents containing permethrin directly to skin. Rather, spray permethrin-containing products only on clothing.
  • DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.
  • DRAIN – Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around and outside your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

You can also mosquito-proof your home by installing or repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out. To report standing water or mosquito breeding call 3-1-1.

In effort to increase awareness about the disease and ways the public can protect themselves, the Department has added a West Nile Virus session to the list of presentations offered by the Speakers Bureau.

Local civic and community organizations can schedule a presentation that will include background on the disease, prevention methods, as well as what people can look out for in regards to signs and symptoms of infection. Presentations can be scheduled by visiting www.EPHealth.com and clicking on “Special Projects.”

 

The mission of the City of El Paso Department of Public Health is to Provide Public Health related research, evaluation, education, prevention, intervention, and preparedness services. For more information on the programs and services we provide, please dial 2-1-1 or visitwww.EPHealth.com or www.EPSalud.com.

First Case of West Nile Virus Confirmed For The Season

EL PASO, Texas – The City of El Paso Department of Public Health announced today that the first West Nile Virus case of the season has been confirmed.

The patient is a man in his mid-40’s who had no reported travel outside of El Paso. The man lives in the East El Paso area and has underlying medical conditions. A total of six West Nile Virus cases were reported last season with the most recent case confirmed in the middle of January.

The City of El Paso Environmental Services Department continues its fogging efforts in order to control adult mosquitoes and will continue treating affected areas as the season continues.

“We want to remind residents that mosquitoes are not just a nuisance but are carriers for some serious diseases,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “We need to be doing everything we can on a personal level to prevent mosquito bites and related disease such as West Nile, Zika, and Chikungunya.”

The best way to avoid exposure to mosquito-borne diseases is to practice the “four Ds”:

DEET – Use insect repellents when you go outdoors. Repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection. To optimize safety and effectiveness, repellents should be used according to the label
instructions.

DRESS – When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors. Mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent will give extra protection. Don’t apply repellents containing permethrin directly to skin. Rather, spray permethrin-containing products only on clothing.

DUSK and DAWN – Although mosquitoes associated with Zika can be active throughout the day, residents should take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours (from dusk to dawn) or consider avoiding outdoor activities during these times.

DRAIN – Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around and outside your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

You can also mosquito-proof your home by installing or repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out. To report standing water or mosquito breeding, please call 3-1-1.

Education

In effort to increase awareness about the disease and ways the public can protect themselves, the Department of Public Health has added a West Nile Virus session to the list of presentations offered by the Speakers Bureau. Local civic and community organizations can schedule a presentation that will include background on the disease, prevention methods, as well as what people can look out for in regards to signs and symptoms of infection. Presentations can be scheduled by visiting www.EPHealth.com and clicking on “Special Projects.”

For more information on the programs and services we provide, please dial 2-1-1 or visit www.EPHealth.com

West Nile Case Reported in El Paso Despite Cold Weather

The City of El Paso Department of Public Health announced today that a sixth person has been diagnosed with West Nile virus in the borderland.

The patient is a man in his 50’s who lives in the western portion of El Paso and is recovering.

“This is not the first time we see West Nile infections during the colder time of the year, but the case is rather unusual,” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “It’s important that we don’t assume mosquito activity ends when the weather gets cold. We know they are out there and we know that some of them are infected, and can spread the virus.”

This latest case has been added to the running list being compiled by the DPH (as shown below.)

Case Sex Age Area of Residence
1 Male 70s Central El Paso
2 Male 20s Central El Paso
3 Male 40s San Elizario
4 Male 30s Lower Valley
5 Female 70s Upper Valley
6 Male 50s Westside

The Department of Public Health continues to recommend mosquito bite prevention tips. To report standing water or other mosquito breeding sites, call 3-1-1. Please be sure to provide address or street names with cross streets when calling.

Fifth West Nile Case Reported in El Paso

The City of El Paso Department of Public Health announced today that a fifth person has been diagnosed with West Nile virus in the borderland. The patient is a woman in her 70’s who lives in the Upper Valley and is recovering.

“As we predicted, the recent rains have created conditions for mosquitoes to thrive in our region. We have identified six mosquito pools in various areas of El Paso that have tested positive for West Nile” said Fernando Gonzalez, Lead Epidemiologist. “We continue to stress the importance of removing standing water in and around the home, and wearing insect repellent as means of protecting ourselves and our families.”

“As you can see from the list, West Nile and other mosquito borne diseases such as Zika, can affect anyone of any age,” said Robert Resendes, Public Health Director. “You’re never too young or too old to protect yourself from mosquitoes and the illnesses they may carry.”

This latest case has been added to the running list being compiled by the DPH (as shown below.) It should also be noted that there were 12 cases reported at this time last year.

Case Sex Age Area of Residence
1 Male 70s Central El Paso
2 Male 20s Central El Paso
3 Male 40s San Elizario
4 Male 30s Lower Valley
5 Female 70s Upper Valley

The Department of Public Health continues to recommend other mosquito bite prevention tips including:

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants
  • Drain standing water both inside and outside your home – Tip and Toss!
  • Stay in cool places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol (Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old)
  • More information is available at www.EPHealth.com under the Zika Virus page

To report standing water or other mosquito breeding sites, call 3-1-1. Please be sure to provide address or street names with cross streets when calling.

The public is also reminded that the Department of Public Health’s Speakers Bureau is also offering presentations to community groups that focus on mosquito-borne disease prevention. This includes both Zika and West Nile. For more information or to schedule a presentation, please click HERE.