window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);} gtag('js', new Date()); gtag('config', 'UA-29484371-30');
Friday , February 22 2019
STEP 728
Utep_DEC_728
Soccer728
RHINOS 2018-2019 728
Bordertown Undergroun Show 728
JustLikeThat728
Home | Tag Archives: yisd (page 4)

Tag Archives: yisd

Ysleta ISD Honors 2018-19 Campus Teachers, Support Employees of Year

On Tuesday, Ysleta ISD announced the 2018-2019 Campus Teachers and Support Employees of the Year.

YISD officials said, “These dedicated teachers and support staff were selected by their campuses to represent the hard work and a determination to help all children succeed…they are honored for outstanding leadership, excellence, and inspiration to students, their colleagues and the community.”

The campus Teachers of the Year will be honored at a reception on March 29 where the top ten teachers will be announced. The finalists will undergo another round of interviews to compete for the top spot as Elementary and Secondary Teacher of the Year.

Ten finalists for Support Employee of the Year finalists will be announced at a later date. Five finalists will be named and the Ysleta ISD Support Employee of the Year will be announced at the gala in May.

All employees will be honored at the 2018-2019 Teacher and Support Employee of the Year Gala on Friday, May 4, 2018 at the Centennial Conference Center and Banquet Hall on Ft. Bliss. The program will begin at 7 pm.

Tickets will go on sale on April 2 for $30 per person. For ticket information, call 434-0690.

The 2018-2019 Teachers and Support Employees of the Year are:

SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Campus Teacher of the Year Support Employee of the Year
Bel Air HS Jennifer Gursky Lore A. Arellano
Cesar Chavez Academy Daniel Figueroa Jr. Jacqueline Cano
Del Valle HS Sherri Bryant Ricardo Lozano
Eastwood HS Selena Granados Alejandro Almeralla
J. M. Hanks HS Michele Garcia Monica Lopez
Parkland HS Marissa Ritch Naomi Castro
Plato Academy Karen McVay Joann R. Leyva
Riverside HS Stephen Solis Maria G. Rodriguez
Tejas School of Choice Jazmin Romero-Carrera Elizabeth Chavez
Valle Verde ECHS Angelica Guzman-Villalobos Maria Pizarro
Ysleta HS Alberto Avalos Rocio G. Vasquez
YCLC NA Aurora Castillo
Bel Air MS Virginia Beaulieu Rebecca I. Torres
Camino Real MS Claudia Prieto Jessie Morales
Desert View MS Melinda Chavez Norma J. Miner
Eastwood MS Marissa Yslas Rita A. Althoff
Indian Ridge MS Melissa Ioan Pedro Duarte
Parkland MS Matthew Olsen Karla V. Acosta
Rio Bravo MS Alondra Ontiveros Sonia Portillo
Riverside MS Rebecca Durate-Bosse Herbert Zeh
Valley View MS Elijah Thompson Teresa Dickerson
Young Women’s Leadership Jessica Yildirim Maria C. Chavez
Ysleta MS Ginna Baray Betty A. Nevarez
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Campus Teacher of the Year Support Employee of the Year
Alicia R. Chacon Int’l Monica Flores Cynthia M Mendoza
Ascarate ES Lonny Nava Edith Serrano
Capistrano ES Jessica J. Ortiz Laura Martinez
Cedar Grove ES Eric Hernandez Guadalupe M. Armendariz
Constance Hulbert ES Brenda Ortega Sonia V. Avila-Sanchez
Del Norte Heights ES Guadalupe Navarrete Miguel Tarango
Del Valle ES Crystal Aguirre-Caballero Maria A. Melano
Desertaire ES Rick Rocha Jose Sanchez
Dolphin Terrace ES Sylvia Carrillo Sundra J. Strickland
East Point ES Gaby Rodarte Trileina M. Rubio
Eastwood Heights ES Vanessa Carlos Cynthia Cardoza
Eastwood Knolls Int’l Ina Pinales Pedro Reyes
Edgemere ES Veronica Andrade Maribeth P. Keller
Glen Cove ES Roberto Guevara III Lisa M. Castañeda
Hacienda Heights Int’l Rossana Garcia Kathleen Gaytan
Lancaster ES Patricia Mendoza Ismael Oaxaca
LeBarron Park ES Ana Ramirez Raul Hernandez
Loma Terrace ES Carol Love Ernestina Santos
Marian Manor ES Danelle White Cecilia Apodaca
Mesa Vista ES Cynthia Tarango Elizabeth Hernandez
Mission Valley ES Veronica Gutierrez Rosella G. Rodarte
North Loop ES Iris Renteria Patricia Armendariz
North Star ES Graciela Garcia Cindy Esparza
Parkland ES Jessica Donacio Anthony E. Rodriguez
Parkland Pre-K Elisa Horiuchi Elva C. Velasco
Pasodale ES Paul Ward Elizabeth M. Quiz
Pebble Hills ES Kristin Podojil Domingo Borrego
Presa ES Wendy Chozet Fatima R. Gaitan De Arellano
Ramona ES Gilda Estrada Sandra Ponce
REL Washington ES Francisco Sierra Belia Benitez
Sageland ES Pamela Licon Minerva Wright
Scotsdale ES Sergio Silva Claudia Enriquez
South Loop ES Brenda Burford David Gonzalez
Thomas Manor ES Marcela Lopez Lili Gonzalez
Tierra Del Sol ES Rosalie Provencio Carmen C. Ovalles
Vista Hills ES Margarita Castillo Ruby Rivera
Ysleta ES Rebecca Frias Samantha J. Bullis-Moya
Ysleta Pre-K Karina Martinez Martha R. Villagrana
CENTRAL SERVICES
Central Office NA Sylvia Castro
Service Center NA Corina C. Casa

Ysleta ISD Appoints Principal for New Del Valle MS

Ysleta Independent School District (YISD) Officials announced Tuesday the appointment of Ida Perales as principal of Del Valle Middle School, which will make up part of a new K-8 combination school that is currently under construction in the Del Valle community.

Perales is the current principal of Camino Real Middle School, a position she has held since July 2016. She began her career in education in 2001 as a biology teacher at Ysleta HS, then worked in the El Paso and Socorro school districts for six years before returning to YISD in 2008 to serve as an instructional specialist and assistant principal.

Perales holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from UTEP.

Construction of YISD’s new $87 million K-8 combination school began last year, thanks to the facilities bond measure approved by voters in November 2015.

Students at the existing Camino Real and Valley View middle schools will be consolidated into the new Del Valle Middle School, which will share the K-8 campus with a new Mission Valley Elementary School.

The new Del Valle Middle School is being built to accommodate up to 1,500 students, who will enjoy modern classrooms, state-of-the-art technology spaces, and new athletics facilities.

Del Valle Middle School will share a kitchen, fine arts facilities, and a gymnasium with Mission Valley Elementary School, but each campus will have separate entrances, classrooms, offices, and cafeterias.

YISD officials add, “By sharing facilities, the 300,000 square-foot combo school will maximize the economies of scale and minimize maintenance and operations costs.”

Op-Ed: Why Public Schools Need Marketing Firms

A few months back on a local blog, the blog author and guests wrote and responded with some indignation about a local school district hiring a “marketing firm.” “Why would a school district need a marketing firm?” they asked with annoyance.

“Surely this money should be spent in the classroom! This is an outrage!” Grumble. Grumble. “Oh, and by the way the superintendent makes too much money and all administrators need to be fired.” Grumble. Grumble.

Being a blog that mostly caters to angry-at-local-politics folks, or people that are just angry in general for having to pay any taxes at all for anything, the echo-chamber cacophony of agreement crescendoed into a roar of annoyance and outrage. Soon, every response was based on agreeing the blog entry itself, with little or no reflection or critical thinking. Anyone trying to counter the argument was immediately branded a suck up, a traitor, or insulted as being “out of touch.”

Rational discourse was not welcome there. No need to respond if you disagreed or had an alternative point of view. The collective minds of the blog mass was already made up. The responses to the blog post went something like this:

“If those schools would just do their jobs, they wouldn’t need a marketing firm!”

“If the schools are losing students, so be it. If they were any good, they
wouldn’t be losing anyone!”

“They didn’t need marketing firms in my day! And look how well I turned
out!”

“Get off my lawn! And fire the superintendent!”

“Yeah, I agree with everything he just said. Ditto!

As EdChoice put it in an article about education marketing: “Shame on schools for trying to get students in their classrooms! Everyone knows those students should just show up, sit down and learn regardless of whether the learning environment is right for them.”

The original kernel of the blog post was actually a good question: “Why would a public school district would want to hire a marketing or “branding” firm?”

Actually, if you dive just a little bit deeper into the topic, “marketing” is not such a bad idea especially in these days of school districts that are under attack from a variety of forces: private schools, home schoolers, angry politicians, but mostly privately owned charter schools. For a public school district to hire a marketing firm to make sense however, you have to think critically about WHY a district would want to market it’s services. It comes down to the reason ANY business or organization would want to market itself: Getting more customers.

In many school districts across the nation, educators are faced with a multitude of forces aligning up in ways that school districts in the past 60 or so post WWII years probably would never have had to think about. Those include:

Loss of students:

In public schools, the students in the seats are the way that the schools make their money. More students mean more money. Less students mean less money.(link)

Think of students like a business thinks of customers. One district in the city has been losing students at the rate of about 1000 per year due to several reasons including major demographic changes in the city. As the oldest school district in the area, the base population is getting older and moving away from the city center towards the outskirts of town where the newer houses, stores, entertainment, and parks are.

Those “outskirts” also are home to other schools districts. Families moving to newer neighborhoods are moving away from the district. Older folks just don’t have babies plain and simple. The post WWII baby boom which fueled the rise of large urban school districts has given way to suburban sprawl and the relocation of younger families to less expensive outlying communities.

Legislative processes fighting against public education:

In the past, there was a strong bipartisan legislative ethic that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, to give it a Star Trek spin. Recently in Texas, along with quite a few mainly Republican, Tea Party controlled states like Kansas and Wisconsin, the legislature has decidedly become anti-public education. The needs of the well heeled few and corporations are becoming more important than the many.

A recent Texas Tribune article sums up the ed funding battle this way:

“The funding challenge facing districts like Kelton, as well as the unique pot of money they are set to lose in three months, stems from decisions by state officials made over a decade ago. In 2006, the Legislature compressed tax rates by a third, after the Texas Supreme Court ordered them to alleviate the high property tax rates in local school districts. They also created a state aid program to make up the extra revenue districts lost by lowering tax rates.”

In their Tea Party fueled fervor, the Texas legislature (along with MANY other GOP controlled state legislatures) has cut funding for students, cut taxes that paid for education, added funding for charter schools, made raising taxes much more difficult than in the past, and generally have decided that public education is not the investment in the future as they once viewed it, although the vast majority of them are products of the exact public school system they say is “broken.”

The idea of the collective good in education has gone on life support and with it, equitable funding. Districts are left with trying to pull funds from an ever increasingly smaller pot. Rich districts in rich suburbs of Houston and Dallas thrive, while those in the Valley, along the Rio Grande and rural areas have to try to succeed using an increasingly smaller pot of funds to draw from.

Charter schools:
Charter schools, no matter what anyone might say otherwise, take funds from public schools by taking students from public schools. (Books have been written about whether charter schools are academically better or not, but in terms of simply sucking money from traditional public school districts, they are poison.) A student that goes to a charter school takes their funding with them.

In El Paso, not only brick and mortar but online charter schools will dig into the “butts-in-seats” funding that is the life blood of public education. The math is simple: If a student is attending an online school, or another school outside your district, you don’t get money for that student.

Charter schools, many backed with not only public funds as well as private funds, can afford to market themselves and have done so aggressively using professional marketing firms, also know as “branding firms.”

How does a school district fight back against demographic changes, a hostile legislature, and a new opponent that does not have to play by the same rules that you have to?

One way would be to just sit back and think that the issue will correct itself over time and go away. This is a poor strategy, much like allowing your opponent to run up the score in the first three quarters thinking you will be able to outscore them in the fourth.

That strategy rarely works. As poor a strategy as it may seem, it is one that many school districts seem to think is viable. Do nothing. Just teach. It will all be fine.

The problem is that while you sit back and do nothing, your competition is advertising about how good they are, with slickly produced ads that beckon parents to give that shiny new charter school a chance.

Consider this ad for Odyssey Charter Schools:

Slick, modern, and tempting. Ads like that are done, for Charter schools, by marketing companies, or branding companies. One should ask, why is it okay for charters, who use public funds, to create marketing, but not for public school districts?

One study in Pennsylvania found that charter schools spend on average, $48 per student per year on advertising.
IDEA Public Charter Schools are in the El Paso area.

They are not shy about advertising:

Planning:
Another way is to create a series of strategic moves that by themselves seem disparate, but when put together make a cohesive plan to bring students back into the district.

The first step is, of course, to have a strong academic program, and to provide services to students that might not be found elsewhere. In El Paso for instance, the EPISD is addressing that issue by bringing in several programs that are unique to the area: International Baccalaureate schools at the middle school level, as well as becoming the largest New Tech High district in the US. The district is also becoming a 1:1 in all secondary campuses, among other things, like having a dual language program at all 54 elementary campuses across the city.

Open Enrollment:
Another step is to allow students from anywhere to come to your district. This is called “open enrollment” and it allows students from anywhere to enroll. Surprisingly enough, in Texas, public schools default to a “closed enrollment” model where students only living in the boundaries of the school district are allowed to attend.

A district has to declare itself “Open Enrollment” to allow other students to attend. Once you have good academic programs in place (that is the most difficult and takes the most time by the way), and you have declared yourself an “open enrollment” district, the students will just start piling into your schools right?

Wrong.

Like any business, you need to advertise. You can have the best product in the world, but if no one knows about it, no one will buy it.

You no doubt have been in a business that has great “word of mouth;” that mystical advertising method where people tell their friends who tell their friends who tell their friends about it. That is a great strategy at first, but after a few months, that business, if it relied solely on people telling their friends how wonderful it is, probably is on financial ropes and is headed for disaster.

They have to advertise some other way, otherwise they will fail. The “build it and they will come” mentality for business and now public schools only works in the movies with ghost baseball players and Kevin Costner.

An article in Forbes Magazine stated exactly why school districts need to market themselves:

“For generations, the thought of a school district hiring outreach help was anathema. Especially during the Baby Boom, educators had one constituency to court: parents. With half the homes in many communities having school age children, the need to fund public schools was obvious. Now, however, it’s not unusual for many districts to have fewer than 30% of households with children in the public schools. Losing their core parental constituency has forced school boards and administrators to embrace social media and move beyond traditional newsletters to explain their value to the broader community.”

That is exactly why school districts need to market themselves. What is the point of creating modern learning spaces, having great academic programs, and not telling your larger community or people looking to move into your area about it?

And telling your community is more than just sending out tweets and posting on Facebook. It is an entire broad based strategy that encompasses every type of media available; something marketing firms do.

The educational landscape has changed. And with it, the need to tell the community about their services has changed as well. School districts can no longer afford to be in a passive role when it comes to marketing their wares.

The idea of marketing education is not a new one. Public universities have been marketing their programs for years and no-one bats an eye.

Here is an example of my local university marketing it’s athletic programs:

 

Even publicly funded community colleges, market themselves because they know that they are in competition with tech and trade schools as well as with universities:

As an article in Public School Review stated last year:

“Ultimately, the trend towards public school marketing signals an important recognition on the part of schools that students and their families have choices, and they are increasingly able to have a say in their own educations. In a prescient 1999 report on privatization in education, the MacKinac Center for Public Policy noted that “in an era of expanded educational freedom, families must now be treated as customers with choices and not as captive audiences.”

Families must be treated as customers with choices and not as captive audiences.

Public schools, if they plan on growing, or even just staying where they are, must advertise and market themselves, like any business. Advertising requires marketing, and good marketing requires hiring people or companies with those exact set of skills. School district are mostly made up of educators, not marketers.

Large scale marketing is a separate set of skills that most educators or school districts, simply do not have.

The irony of all this, especially on the blog that I mentioned earlier, is that those same angry anti-everything commenters will be the first to say something to the effect that “school districts need to be run like businesses.” When a school district does EXACTLY that, the same angry readers get even angrier.

Marketing is no longer a “nice to have.” It is a “need to have” for public school districts. To think otherwise would be a fool’s errand.

***

Author: Tim Holt is an educator and writer, with over 33 years experience in education and opines on education-related topics here and on his own award-winning blog: HoltThink. He values your feedback. Feel free to leave a comment.  Read his previous columns here.

YISD’s Dr. Xavier De La Torre Elected As Chair of Texas Urban Council of Superintendents

Dr. Xavier De La Torre, Superintendent of Schools at the Ysleta Independent School District, was unanimously elected to serve as the 2019 chair of the Texas Urban Council of Superintendents, a network of the state’s largest urban school districts that meets regularly to discuss governance, leadership, management, governmental relations, and other topics relevant to traditional urban public schools.

“It is my honor and a pleasure to provide leadership to the largest school districts in Texas as the 2019 Chair of the Texas Urban Council of Superintendents,” De La Torre said. “In my new role as Chair, I am eager to lead the discussion on the areas of greatest opportunity and challenge in our school districts, and give El Paso and Ysleta ISD a much-needed voice at both the state and national levels.”

The Council, which was founded nearly 50 years ago, consists of nine school districts in Corpus Christi, El Paso, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, and Fort Worth areas that represent nearly 800,000 students and 50,000 teachers.

Because these districts serve large urban communities, their schools share similar interests and challenges, such as second-language learning; increasing college access; and school turnaround.

These urban districts also routinely serve larger percentages of children living in poverty who are less likely to have parents with high levels of education, and are constantly balancing different barriers.

De La Torre, who joined YISD in 2014, has a 30-year history of dedicated service to large, diverse student populations, and a career chronicled by recognized achievements and awards, including an El Pasoan of the Year nomination (2016); two Broad Prize Award finalist nominations (2009, 2010); and the Edgar L. Morphet Award for the nation’s most outstanding dissertation aimed at the educational issues (2005).

During De La Torre’s tenure at YISD, the district’s most vulnerable student groups have seen increased achievement under the state of Texas’ STAAR/EOC accountability system. English Language Learners and Special Education students have routinely outperformed their peers in the region and across the state, while student achievement on the state’s End of Course exams has led the region and the state when considering comparable school districts and demographics.

Coupled with the introduction of El Paso’s first single-gender, college preparatory school for girls; two new Early College High School programs; new STEM programs; and the passage of a $430.5 million facilities bond, De La Torre has emerged as a regional authority in El Paso relative to the American public school system.

“Dr. De La Torre embodies the type of leader we need guiding our school systems,” said Richard Castro, board chairman of the Council on Regional Economic Expansion and Educational Development (CREEED) and CEO of Castro Enterprises. “His desire and willingness to provide creative and innovative education experiences will help push the needle forward for El Paso’s educational attainment.”

Valle Verde ECHS Science Bowl Team Wins, Headed to DC In April

Ysleta ISD’s Valle Verde Early College High School National Science Bowl team will be headed to the national championship once again.

The VVECHS Spartans won the El Paso Regional NSB competition, defeating Northwest ECHS 42-0 in the finals.  This marks the fifth year in a row for the Spartans, as they are now headed to the national competition in Washington D.C. in April.

Coached by James Brown, the team members are Samuel Juardo, Angelica Amaya, Juan Vasquez, Jacob Lane, Daniel Lara, and coordinators Gabriel Mendoza and Jesusita Ibarra.

The National Science Bowl, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a national academic competition that tests students’ knowledge in all areas of science and math.

Teams from diverse backgrounds face-off in a fast-paced question and answer format, testing on a range of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy, and math.

Each year, the National Science Bowl attracts over 17,000 students nationwide, challenging them to expand their knowledge of science and mathematics and their understanding of global energy and environmental challenges.

Eastwood High Senior Awarded YISD’s President’s Award for February

The Ysleta ISD Board of Trustees honored Eastwood High School senior Ryan Solis, who has devoted nearly 500 hours of his free time over the past four years to community and public service, with the February President’s Award.

Aside from participating in more than 20 extracurricular clubs, Ryan is an active part of the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce, where he served as an associate director and the youngest member of the Board of Governors for two terms. He is also a district office intern with State Senator Cesar Blanco in the Office of Texas House Minority Whip.

In addition, Ryan co-founded a community project called Safety in Cognizance, which seeks to combat human trafficking on the U.S.-Mexico border by working with international organizations. Through this project, Ryan has given presentations on safety and prevention that have impacted more than 1,200 students.

Ryan’s exceptional work has been honored nationwide with a Disney Dreamer Award – and last week, he accepted a community service award in Washington D.C. from the National Hispanic Heritage Foundation. Ryan’s efforts to improve the lives of all residents in the El Paso region are admirable, and YISD is proud to honor his passion and dedication to public service.

The President’s Award is given by the President of the Board of Trustees to a YISD student who has demonstrated exceptional and/or innovative, out-of-the-ordinary service to others, particularly those within the YISD community. This award will be presented to the selected recipient a maximum of once per month during the regularly scheduled meeting of the YISD Board of Trustees.

Eligible YISD students must be nominated for the award by a school principal, assistant principal, or Trustee; and must be in good academic and disciplinary standing.

Ramona Elementary Students Get Hands-On Experience on Robotic Surgery

Fifth and sixth grade students at Ysleta ISD’s Ramona Elementary School got the unique chance to be part of a surgical team.

Recently, students participated in a medical session on surgical procedures and careers that make up a surgical team. The students learned about techniques such as open surgery, robotic surgery and laparoscopic surgery.

Using hands-on simulator, students had the opportunity to become familiar with some of the tools used, practice with tools.  The students learned the responsibility of each member on a surgical team and the care and dedication that it takes from each of them to function as a team.

Students also discovered what services other members of the surgical team provides a patient whether dealing with a minor situation or a life-saving procedure.

Ramona Elementary School is a Dual Language campus, with kinder through sixth grade students experiencing STEM challenges throughout the year utilizing the engineering design process.

Herald-Post Best of 2017: Year in Pictures

It’s another year in the history books, as 2017 fades and 2018 dawns.

From the streets of downtown, to the football fields of the schools around town, to the houses of worship throughout the Borderland and locations in between, our photographers were busy documenting our story.

Below are the best shots from our team of photographers: Chief Photographer Andres Acosta, Steven Cottingham and Kevin Venegas.

Ysleta ISD Honors Student for Successes in School, Disaster Relief Work

Valle Verde Early College High School junior Paloma Michel was honored by the Ysleta ISD Board of Trustees, as they bestowed the President’s Award during their December board meeting.

Paloma participates in organizations that include the STEM Club, National Honor Society, and the Garden Club, where she works with other students throughout the year to beautify the school’s exterior with sunflowers and other vegetation.

But Paloma’s most significant contribution this year extends far beyond the walls of Valle Verde. When a devastating earthquake hit Mexico in September, Paloma’s heart went out to the victims because she spent much of her childhood in Mexico. When she saw a Facebook post about a love note discovered among the ruins by a firefighter, it became her call to action.

She organized a school drive to collect items for quake survivors, and was able to gather six truckloads of donated items that included personal hygiene products, diapers, first-aid kits, canned goods, and water.

Via a news release, YISD Officials said, “We commend Paloma for her initiative, generosity, and spirit for community service.”

The President’s Award is given by the President of the Board of Trustees to a YISD student who has demonstrated exceptional and/or innovative, out-of-the-ordinary service to others, particularly those within the YISD community. This award will be presented to the selected recipient a maximum of once per month during the regularly scheduled meeting of the YISD Board of Trustees.

Eligible YISD students must be nominated for the award by a school principal, assistant principal, or Trustee; and must be in good academic and disciplinary standing.

YISD Investigation into Hanks Tuberculosis Exposure Yields Two Positive Test Results

On Wednesday afternoon, the Department of Public Health (DPH) announced two individuals have tested positive for Tuberculosis (TB) infection in the recent investigation involving Hanks High School.

The department identified 140 individuals who may have been exposed to a person at the school who was diagnosed with active TB disease and a 138 individuals have been screened. Tests revealed two positive results.

The following is a chart describing the current investigation standings.

Persons Potentially Exposed 140
Tested To-Date 138
Test Rate 99%
Results Known 136
Number of Positive Results 2
Positivity Rate 1.5%

Public Health officials estimate a positivity rate for El Paso between 5% and 10%, and the actual rate of 1.5% is well below what is expected.

Those tested by DPH have been notified of their results and the two patients who tested positive for TB infection will be evaluated by a nurse specializing in TB. They will also receive X-rays to ensure the disease has not developed in their lungs. Those who tested negative for TB will be retested within the next 8 to 10 weeks as a precaution.

“While we wish there were no TB in El Paso, the fact is that the disease is part of our everyday life,” said Robert Resendes, Public Health Director. “We are pleased with this low number, and hope to see similar results in February when we retest these individuals.”

Last year, 43 cases of active TB were identified and treated in the greater El Paso region with 38 in 2015 and 44 in 2014. Every year, the department identifies and treats approximately 250 latent cases of the disease.

Residents with questions or concerns are urged to visit www.EPHealth.com and click on the TB Investigation section for updated information and data regarding TB, how it is spread, and how to protect yourself from the disease.

YISD Turns to Public for Help in Naming New Del Valle-Area Middle School

The Ysleta Independent School District is taking recommendations for the new name for the middle school in the Del Valle area.

Students from Camino Real Middle School and Valley View Middle School, as well as Mission Valley Elementary School, will benefit from a newly built combination campus.

The two schools will have separate entrances, classrooms, offices, and cafeterias, but will share kitchens, fine arts facilities, and a gymnasium.

The shared facilities will maximize the economies of scale and minimize maintenance and operations costs, while providing students will upgraded facilities. Mission Valley Elementary School will retain their school name.

Nominations must be completed on the 2017-2018 Nomination Form to Name a New School/Facility (link below).  The form should be submitted along with supplemental material via electronic mail or by mail.

Deadline for nominations is Wednesday, January 11, 2018.

Click here to visit the project webpage.

Click here to download the nomination form.

Health Department: Possible TB Exposure Approximately 150 students in Ysleta ISD

The City of El Paso Department of Public Health is currently investigating a possible Tuberculosis (TB) exposure involving approximately 150 students in the Ysleta Independent School District.

“The cooperation offered by Ysleta ISD officials has been excellent, and we will continue to work closely with school officials to make sure those specific students who have been identified at-risk are tested,” said Robert Resendes, Public Health Director. “The health and well-being of our community is our utmost priority, and we ask that parents who receive the Department of Public Health letter participate in the screening process so we can determine whether or not their child is infected, and provide appropriate evaluation and treatment.”

The Department will be sending letters to the parents informing them that their child(ren) may have had close contact with someone with active TB.

As a precaution, the Department of Public Health is recommending that these individuals be screened for TB through a blood draw that will be tested at the Department of Public Health laboratory in El Paso.

Parents who receive a letter from the Department of Public Health who have additional questions may call the City of El Paso Department of Public Health at 915-212-6609.

Tuberculosis is a bacterial illness acquired through breathing in infected droplets from the cough or sneeze of a person with active TB. Tuberculosis is not easily transmitted. The likelihood of transmission increases with length of exposure to the cough/sneeze of someone with active TB.

Additional information about TB can be found at online by clicking TB Control under “Programs”.

Ysleta ISD officials released the following statement:

“The Ysleta Independent School District is cooperating fully with the El Paso City Department of Public Health regarding this case. The district is following all procedures as prescribed by district and city health policies. The district has been directed by the City Department of Public Health to refer all inquiries to them. Please contact them at (915) 212-6609.”

YISD Introduces New App to Report Bullying, Campus Concerns

The Ysleta Independent School District (YISD) announced Thursday the introduction of a new communications system, Anonymous Alerts, which makes it easy for students and parents to quickly and confidentially report bullying and other sensitive incidents to school administrators.

“We believe the best way to address student problems is through personal contact with a teacher, administrator, psychologist, or counselor,” said YISD Superintendent of Schools Dr. Xavier De La Torre. “However, we understand there may be instances where a student or parent would prefer to communicate anonymously. Anonymous Alerts affords our students and parents the opportunity to speak up about harmful behavior without fear of retribution.”

To help launch Anonymous Alerts, YISD is encouraging all stakeholders to participate in “Download Day” on Friday, December 1, which calls for students, staff, and parents to download the free Anonymous Alerts app from the iPhone or Google Play store.

With the app, users will be able to send anonymous and encrypted private messages to school administrators on urgent or sensitive topics, such as bullying, self-harm, family difficulties, weapons, drug/ alcohol abuse, dating violence, depression, or gang-related issues, among others.

Via a news release, YISD officials add “Both the app and online forms are available in English or Spanish and all reports remain completely anonymous, though users have the option to reveal their identity if they prefer to have a person-to-person discussion…the program is monitored from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the school year, and should only be used for serious and urgent matters.”

A parent letter has been sent to all YISD homes with a code and password to activate their Anonymous Alerts mobile app.

Students and parents also have the option to submit confidential online reports by clicking on the “Anonymous Alerts” button on the district’s main webpage.

For more information visit Anonymous Alerts.

YISD’s Young Women’s Leadership Academy Holding Mandatory Info Sessions

Ysleta ISD’s Young Women’s Leadership Academy (YWLA) will hold five mandatory information sessions beginning November 30 for parents interested in enrolling their daughters for the 2018-2019 school year.

WLA Principal Malinda Villalobos will speak in detail about the school, its core values, programs, and course offerings, as well as logistical information including transportation. Parents will have the opportunity to speak with YWLA administrators before receiving an application packet.

The information sessions are free and open to any current fifth-grade girl and their families. In addition, limited spaces are available for current sixth grade girls who are interested in enrolling at YWLA for seventh grade.

All students interested in enrolling in YWLA must be in good academic and behavioral standing at their current school, live in El Paso County, and complete an application packet to be considered for enrollment.

Information sessions schedule:

6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 30, at YWLA
6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 6, at YWLA
8:30 a.m., Tuesday, Dec. 19, at YISD Central Office Theater
6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, at YWLA
8:30 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, at YISD Central Office Theater

To RSVP for an upcoming information session, or for more information, parents should call the YWLA office at 915-434-1300.

REPLAY: Greater El Paso Football Showcase Draft (Parts 1 & 2)

High school football fans will be able to watch the Greater El Paso Football Showcase’s first-ever draft!

From the unveiling of the team names, to the first picks and on through the five rounds, you can catch all the draft action!

The broadcast is available to fans via any web-enabled device. No App Needed. Just Log On and Watch the Fun.

Part 2 of the draft is below:

Soccer728
RHINOS 2018-2019 728
STEP 728
Bordertown Undergroun Show 728
Utep_DEC_728
JustLikeThat728