YISD - Ysleta ISD Building - Photo Courtesy of YISD
Ysleta ISD Building - Photo Courtesy of YISD

TEA: Ysleta ISD, campuses earn coveted “A” rating

The Ysleta Independent School District earned a coveted “A” rating for overall academic performance from the Texas Education Agency (TEA), with 98 percent of its campuses also earning top ratings of either “A” or “B” for their educational programs, according to state accountability results released Monday.

Of the nearly 1,200 public school districts in Texas that were rated this year, Ysleta ISD was among only 396 to receive an “A” rating for its performance in three domains: Student Achievement, School Progress, and Closing the Gaps. Ysleta ISD is also the only “A”-rated district among the city of El Paso’s largest districts.

Among 8,451 campuses rated this year, only about 28 percent – or 2,356 schools – earned an “A” rating from TEA. In Ysleta ISD, 54 percent of campuses earned an “A” rating, including the following 28 campuses:

  • Ysleta Pre-K Center
  • Alicia R. Chacon IS
  • Desertaire ES
  • Del Norte Heights ES
  • Dolphin Terrace ES
  • Del Valle ES
  • Edgemere IS
  • Eastwood Heights ES
  • Eastwood Knolls IS
  • East Point ES
  • Glen Cove ES
  • Mission Valley ES
  • North Star ES
  • Pebble Hills ES
  • Ramona ES
  • REL Washington IS
  • Sageland ES
  • Scotsdale ES
  • Tierra Del Sol ES
  • Thomas Manor ES
  • Vista Hills ES
  • Rio Bravo MS
  • Del Valle HS
  • Hanks HS
  • Valle Verde Early College HS
  • Young Women’s Leadership Academy
  • Plato Academy
  • Tejas School of Choice

“Congratulations to our leadership, administrators, teachers, staff, and community for pulling together to make it happen,” said Ysleta ISD Superintendent of Schools Dr. Xavier De La Torre. “The fact that we managed to earn an ‘A’ rating in the aftermath of one of the most uncertain and challenging times in modern history is truly phenomenal.

“We challenged ourselves to recover quickly because we couldn’t imagine sitting on our hands for four or five years while an entire generation of children came through our schools,” Dr. De La Torre added. “Our myopic focus on student achievement has paid off! Our students are learning, growing, and succeeding, and we look forward to more accomplishments and milestones in the years to come.”

TEA officials said this year’s ratings are a promising sign in the state’s efforts to combat COVID-related learning loss. Significant gains in student growth last year resulted in 25 percent of districts and 33 percent of campuses improving their ratings from 2019, the last time ratings were issued. In addition, 18 percent of high-poverty campuses in Texas received “A” ratings, proving demographics do not equal destiny, TEA officials said.

“These results show our state’s significant investment in the post-pandemic academic recovery of Texas public school students is bearing fruit,” said Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath. “I’m grateful for the driving force behind this year’s success: our teachers and local school leaders.”

Every year, the state assigns a rating from A-F – similar to report card grades – to districts and campuses to demonstrate how much students are learning, whether they’re ready for the next grade, and postsecondary readiness. This year, however, districts and campuses received ratings of only “A,” “B,” or “C” or a  “Not Rated” label in accordance with Senate Bill 1365.

For a complete list of TEA ratings, visit www.txschools.gov.

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