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Courtesy: UTEP

UT System Board of Regents Approves Tuition Increase for UTEP

On Monday, the University of Texas System Board of Regents approved tuition and fee increase proposals for all of the System academic institutions including The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP).

“We are very appreciative of the Board of Regents approving our tuition and fee increases,” said Gary Edens, Ed.D., vice president of student affairs and chair of the student-majority Tuition and Fees Advisory Committee.

“The committee engaged in a very consultative and collaborate process with all of our stakeholders for the proposal. All students have concerns about the cost of higher education, but UTEP students understand that their competitiveness upon graduation from UTEP relies on our capacity to provide them educational experiences comparable to those available to their peers in more affluent settings. Even with this modest increase, UTEP will still have the lowest net cost of research universities in Texas and in the nation.”

Based on 15 credit hours per semester, for most UTEP in-state students, the increase in tuition and fees will be about $163 per semester in 2016 and $170 in 2017.

For out-of-state students, the increases will be about $430 and $450, respectively, for each fiscal year.

For in-state graduate students the increase will be about $121 for 2016 and $126 for 2017; out-of-state graduate students will see increases of $282 and $295, respectively.

Author: UTEP

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2 comments

  1. Seems to me that the richest of all State supported institutions of higher learning could find a way to provide free or very reasonably priced tuition. The claim is that they underpay their instructional staff, and save money by withholding tenure, and only offering part time positions, so where does the money go?

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